Expecting Rain
http://www.expectingrain.com/discussions/

A Questions Thread
http://www.expectingrain.com/discussions/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=74503
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Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 22:23 GMT ]
Post subject:  A Questions Thread

Since I guess we all know and don't know different kinds of things, and you all probably know more than I do, I thought it would be good to have a thread for just questions and answers regarding Bob's literary sources and works he mentions.... and anyway I just have a question.

What is the title of the book Bob is referring to here?
Bob in Chronicles wrote:
Endless rows of books -- Sophocles' book on the nature and function of the gods -- why there were only two sexes.

:?:

Author:  jcastro [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 23:04 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

the most famous sophocles book is Antigona, I think ...

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 23:12 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

jcastro wrote:
the most famous sophocles book is Antigona, I think ...


Thanks. I looked at some websites, but I wanted to make sure it is the right one.

Author:  erikdw123 [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 23:39 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Sophocles was a play writer and only seven of his plays have survived the ages

The three Theban plays (The beautiful ‘Antigone’, ‘Oedipus the King’ and ‘Oedipus at Colonus’)
and four others: ‘Ajax’, ‘The Women of Trachis’, ‘Electra’, and ‘Philoctetes’.

I’ve read them once upon a time, but to the best of my recollection, none of them dealt with “the nature and function of the gods -- why there were only two sexes.”.
So unless some major themes went by me completely unnoticed (certainly a possibility), Bob was either confused or talking out of his a**.

(Then again, Bob might have done an amazing discovery in some ancient Greek bookstore.
Sophocles supposedly wrote over a hundred 100 plays :))

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 23:43 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Quote:
Bob was either confused or talking out of his a**.


Yes.... after all, he saw the book on the shelf of someone who probably didn't even exist. :lol:

Could it be he just meant a different author writing on those subjects?

Author:  scottw [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 23:52 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Johanna Parker wrote:
What is the title of the book Bob is referring to here?
Bob in Chronicles wrote:
Endless rows of books -- Sophocles' book on the nature and function of the gods -- why there were only two sexes.

:?:

Richard Thomas suggests that the book does not exist:
Other classical works encountered in the “library” of Ray Gooch include The Twelve Caesars (presumably the work of Suetonius), “Tacitus’ lectures and letters to Brutus,” “Pericles’ Ideal State of Democracy,” Ovid’s Metamorphoses, “the scary horror tale,” and “Sophocles’ book on the nature and function of the gods.” It is curious that three of these are non-existent books, but in subtle ways: Tacitus wrote a dialogue about orators (including the long-dead Brutus, to whom Cicero wrote actual, surviving letters); Pericles, who was an Athenian general, wrote nothing that survives but looms large in Thucydides, whose work includes the general’s famous funeral oration, which does treat the ideal state of Athenian democracy; Sophocles only wrote tragedies, but they are often about the nature and function of the gods.

http://journal.oraltradition.org/files/ ... Thomas.pdf

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sun February 17th, 2013, 23:56 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Wow. :o Well, other than those existant works of Ovid, at least you can't copy nonexistant book. Not bad though - I'll think about it in the morning.

Thanks.

Author:  Giada [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 00:37 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

"why there were only two sexes"
Definitely not Sophocles, but it might be a reference to Plato's Symposium, Aristophanes's speech in particular.

Author:  goombay [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 00:51 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

LOL

Maybe bob took something from the book that he analyzed in his mind as the reason for the two sexes. where somebody dont see it bob may have. :shock:

Everybodys mind works differently. Bob is not a schoolteacher. :shock:

Author:  raging_glory [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 01:06 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Thanks for the Thompson PDF. Fascinating.

Author:  charlesdarwin [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 11:55 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Just a thought, but Cicero wrote a very famous and influential work called On the Nature of the Gods and is regarded by some as the true author the dialogue on orators attributed to Tacitus.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 11:59 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

charlesdarwin wrote:
Just a thought, but Cicero wrote a very famous and influential work called On the Nature of the Gods and is regarded by some as the true author the dialogue on orators attributed to Tacitus.


Thanks charles, I'll make a note of that.

Which probably leads straight to the question of
Quote:
How to best develope a thread for annotating Chronicles?

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 19:41 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Excuse if it's a monumentally silly question, but do the houses in the photos Bob painted from survive? The postcard photos are from the 1930s or earlier, so....
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.491701507535053&type=1

Author:  erikdw123 [ Mon February 18th, 2013, 23:57 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

scottw wrote:
Richard Thomas suggests that the book does not exist:
Other classical works encountered in the “library” of Ray Gooch include The Twelve Caesars (presumably the work of Suetonius), “Tacitus’ lectures and letters to Brutus,” “Pericles’ Ideal State of Democracy,” Ovid’s Metamorphoses, “the scary horror tale,” and “Sophocles’ book on the nature and function of the gods.” It is curious that three of these are non-existent books, but in subtle ways: Tacitus wrote a dialogue about orators (including the long-dead Brutus, to whom Cicero wrote actual, surviving letters); Pericles, who was an Athenian general, wrote nothing that survives but looms large in Thucydides, whose work includes the general’s famous funeral oration, which does treat the ideal state of Athenian democracy; Sophocles only wrote tragedies, but they are often about the nature and function of the gods.

http://journal.oraltradition.org/files/ ... Thomas.pdf

Thanks! Fascinating.
Bob sure is a fan of Ovid.

Unfortunately, that last statement about Sophocles is complete nonsense and any scholar of ancient Greek literature would rip Mr Thomas to pieces for it.

The human character is the main focus of all of Sophocles surviving plays.
It’s basically what he’s known for, so even I know this :)

People here will probably be familiar with Antigone and Oedipus, but the other four that have survived are no different in theme.
Here are four short synopsis taken from Wiki:

Ajax focuses on the proud hero of the Trojan War, Telamonian Ajax, who is driven to treachery and eventually suicide. Ajax becomes gravely upset when Achilles’ armor is presented to Odysseus instead of himself. Despite their enmity toward him, Odysseus persuades the kings Menelaus and Agamemnon to grant Ajax a proper burial.

The Women of Trachis (named for the Trachinian women who make up the chorus) dramatizes Deianeira's accidentally killing Heracles after he had completed his famous twelve labors. Tricked into thinking it is a love charm, Deianeira applies poison to an article of Heracles' clothing; this poisoned robe causes Heracles to die an excruciating death. Upon learning the truth, Deianeira commits suicide.

Electra corresponds roughly to the plot of Aeschylus' Libation Bearers. It details how Electra and Orestes' avenge their father Agamemnon's murder by Clytemnestra and Aegisthus.

Philoctetes retells the story of Philoctetes, an archer who had been abandoned on Lemnos by the rest of the Greek fleet while on the way to Troy. After learning that they cannot win the Trojan War without Philoctetes' bow, the Greeks send Odysseus and Neoptolemus to retrieve him; due to the Greeks' earlier treachery, however, Philoctetes refuses to rejoin the army. It is only Heracles' deus ex machina appearance that persuades Philoctetes to go to Troy.

Nothing about the nature and function of the gods.

Author:  Giada [ Tue February 19th, 2013, 00:21 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

^
Yeah, 'nature and function of the gods' is more accurate for Aeschylus, especially with regards to the Oresteia and Prometheus Bound.

Author:  erikdw123 [ Tue February 19th, 2013, 00:29 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

I have a question too.

It stems from this thread:
http://www.expectingrain.com/discussions/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=68276&hilit=question+mr+tambourine+man+i%27m+not+there

At the end of I’m Not There (the movie) there is footage of a fabulous 1966 live performance of Mr. Tambourine Man.
The same footage can be found in Eat The Document.

When and where was this footage recorded?

Manchester, Dublin, Leicester, Edingburgh and Sheffield have all been ruled out already.
Bristol and the two Royal Albert Hall shows seem very doubtful.

Does anybody know?

Author:  erikdw123 [ Tue February 19th, 2013, 03:49 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Johanna Parker wrote:
Excuse if it's a monumentally silly question, but do the houses in the photos Bob painted from survive? The postcard photos are from the 1930s or earlier, so....
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.491701507535053&type=1

Never been to New Orleans :(
but when I clicked on this one

Image

a new window opened with the name and street number.
628-630 Toulouse Street, New Orleans, LA, USA.

I copied and pasted the address into Google maps and this is where Google Street View took me

Image

There's no view of the back of the building so decide for yourself :)

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Tue February 19th, 2013, 10:37 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

That's great, Erik, thanks.
I've not been to New Orleans either, but one day I'll go. :)
Maybe somebody knows for sure about these places (clarx?)

Unfortunately, I don't have a clue about the '66 footage.

Author:  rolling_thunder [ Tue February 19th, 2013, 20:01 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Would you believe I've lived in Louisiana for 13 years and I've never been to New Orleans either :shock:

Author:  jimb727 [ Sat February 23rd, 2013, 02:01 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

This is a "Questions" thread and I'm not seeing many of these. ????

Why is that??

Author:  MMD [ Sat February 23rd, 2013, 05:49 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

scottw wrote:
Sophocles only wrote tragedies, but they are often about the nature and function of the gods.

http://journal.oraltradition.org/files/ ... Thomas.pdf



Antigone is about the nature and conflict between human and divine law. I think Scott and Richard have this one worked out.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sat February 23rd, 2013, 09:42 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

jimb727 wrote:
This is a "Questions" thread and I'm not seeing many of these. ????

Why is that??


Ask away.
:?:

Author:  jimb727 [ Sat February 23rd, 2013, 15:59 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Johanna Parker wrote:
jimb727 wrote:
This is a "Questions" thread and I'm not seeing many of these. ????

Why is that??


Ask away.
:?:



Why wasn't the naming of this forum given to the people??

Per se a vote. A democratic vote.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sat February 23rd, 2013, 17:29 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Are there painter's easels that you can automatically move the canvas up and down to reach all areas if it's very large? Because these paintings are huge and Bob isn't that tall really. I'm trying to imagine how he works on them.

Author:  the_revelator [ Mon February 25th, 2013, 05:06 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: A Questions Thread

Johanna Parker wrote:
Are there painter's easels that you can automatically move the canvas up and down to reach all areas if it's very large? Because these paintings are huge and Bob isn't that tall really. I'm trying to imagine how he works on them.



Yes, but more than likely his studio assistants have built a 'pulley system,' which is commonly used to easily access every area of very large canvases.

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