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Chronicles Volume One revisited
http://www.expectingrain.com/discussions/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=74281
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Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri March 20th, 2015, 16:40 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Thought that couldn't have got past you. Odd indeed.

Author:  bobschool [ Sun March 22nd, 2015, 07:30 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

scottw wrote:
Isn't that odd? I posted about this on Twitter last year.
https://twitter.com/scottwarmuth1/statu ... 7542393856

Dylan has peppered this passage with bits from Jack London.

Chronicles: Volume One, p. 96:
"It was like a great tree had fallen. Hearing about Hank's death caught me squarely on the shoulder. The silence of outer space never seemed so loud."

"The White Silence" by Jack London:
"The stillness was weird; not a breath rustled the frost-encrusted forest; the cold and silence of outer space had chilled the heart and smote the trembling lips of nature. A sigh pulsed through the air, - they did not seem to actually hear it, but rather felt it, like the premonition of movement in a motionless void. Then the great tree, burdened with its weight of years and snow, played its last part in the tragedy of life. He heard the warning crash and attempted to spring up, but almost erect, caught the blow squarely on the shoulder."

Chronicles: Volume One, p. 96:
"When I hear Hank sing, all movement ceases. The slightest whisper seems sacrilege."

"The White Silence" by Jack London:
"Nature has many tricks wherewith she convinces man of his finity--the ceaseless flow of the tides, the fury of the storm, the shock of the earthquake, the long roll of heaven's artillery--but the most tremendous, the most stupefying of all, is the passive phase of the White Silence. All movement ceases, the sky clears, the heavens are as brass; the slightest whisper seems sacrilege, and man becomes timid, affrighted at the sound of his own voice."



SCORREE Scott. that is wild. i mean a call of the wild. :lol:

so was Stephen Miller's Kristofferson bio published in 2010? maybe Miller saw your Bob/Chronicles research in 2008-2009, and wanted to allude to, or put this 'Easter Egg' in, to reference how Hank-Kris-Bob were tied together as the most poetic and revolutionary of the country music outlaws?

And to think it comes back 'round to a progenitor of the lyrical American West vernacular drama - Jack London!

All four mythmakers of the 'stolid independent American Man' - and all four outsider-leaning rascals - amazing.

thanks Scott, you're the best Easter Egg hunter.

Author:  oldmanemu [ Sun March 22nd, 2015, 11:34 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

yes

Author:  michael curtius [ Sun March 29th, 2015, 08:36 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

"He steals what he loves and loves what he steals."

Sean Wilentz - Bob Dylan in America

Author:  oldmanemu [ Sun March 29th, 2015, 22:44 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

michael curtius wrote:
"He steals what he loves and loves what he steals."

Sean Wilentz - Bob Dylan in America

He is not unique , I do the same

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Tue February 2nd, 2016, 13:52 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Chronicles:
"a musician and songwriter who had even written a couple of songs that Elvis recorded. "

Wikipedia:
"In later years Bob Johnston claimed that songs still credited to his wife Joy Byers were actually co-written, or solely written by himself. He has cited old "contractual reasons" for this situation. The songs in question include Timi Yuro's 1962 hit "What's A Matter Baby", plus at least 16 songs for Elvis Presley's films between 1964 and 1968"

Nice bit of reverse irony...

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sun February 7th, 2016, 12:39 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

...in which Bob Dylan in 1970 reads a magazine that ceased publication in 1954, and then re-read it in the early 2000s.

Image

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Mon February 15th, 2016, 11:31 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Between Rohmer, Shakespeare and Dostoyevsky, I think Dylan's 'freak accident' (if there was one) was he was bit by a dog.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Wed February 17th, 2016, 16:38 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Is Bob's "aunt Etta" in Chronicles a real person?

Author:  goodnitesteve [ Wed February 17th, 2016, 16:56 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Johanna Parker wrote:
...in which Bob Dylan in 1970 reads a magazine that ceased publication in 1954, and then re-read it in the early 2000s.

Image


When does this happen?

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Wed February 17th, 2016, 17:03 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

p.139 of the paperback. Dylan says a copy of Collier's magazine was in the studio as he recorded New Morning. However, the magazine had ceased publication years before. It's interesting, however, that the magazine serialized some of the Fu Manchu stories, from which Dylan generously quotes throughout Chronicles.

Author:  goodnitesteve [ Wed February 17th, 2016, 18:36 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Johanna Parker wrote:
p.139 of the paperback. Dylan says a copy of Collier's magazine was in the studio as he recorded New Morning. However, the magazine had ceased publication years before. It's interesting, however, that the magazine serialized some of the Fu Manchu stories, from which Dylan generously quotes throughout Chronicles.


That's great.

Author:  Fred@Dreamtime [ Fri February 19th, 2016, 13:16 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

goodnitesteve wrote:
Johanna Parker wrote:
p.139 of the paperback. Dylan says a copy of Collier's magazine was in the studio as he recorded New Morning. However, the magazine had ceased publication years before. It's interesting, however, that the magazine serialized some of the Fu Manchu stories, from which Dylan generously quotes throughout Chronicles.


That's great.


That's a very interesting passage in Chronicles that I discuss in my blog: http://www.dreamtimepodcast.com/2009/08 ... g-bob.html

Author:  Fred@Dreamtime [ Fri February 19th, 2016, 13:22 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

and re Dylan's remarks on his hand injury in Chronicles. I've mentioned this before in ER, Johanna, but if you haven't seen it you might find it of interest...

Quote:
Taking a page from my pal Scott Warmuth, I'll note that Dylan's passage on the hand injury...

"Then it hit me….. Returning from the emergency room with my arm entombed in plaster I fell into a chair – something heavy had come against me. It was like a black leopard had torn at my tattered flesh. It was plenty sore…. I was on the threshold of nothing, ruined. This could be the last turn of the screw. The trail had come to a halt." (Chronicles page 156)

... is ah, strangely reminiscent of a passage from a pulp novel...

"... A black leopard, having its fore-paws upon the dead man's breast, turned ... dead--whilst the creature's gleaming fangs were buried in the tattered flesh..."

And that pulp novel? Why, it's by Sax Rohmer. And it's title?

"The Hand of Fu-Manchu"

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri February 19th, 2016, 13:43 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Yes, I've seen it. Thank you.
I believe though that Dylan specifies what happened, if you read between the lines and look deeper into some of the quotes in that section.

Author:  goodnitesteve [ Fri February 19th, 2016, 17:33 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Johanna Parker wrote:
p.139 of the paperback. Dylan says a copy of Collier's magazine was in the studio as he recorded New Morning. However, the magazine had ceased publication years before. It's interesting, however, that the magazine serialized some of the Fu Manchu stories, from which Dylan generously quotes throughout Chronicles.
That's great.

That's a very interesting passage in Chronicles that I discuss in my blog: http://www.dreamtimepodcast.com/2009/08 ... g-bob.html


This is very interesting, but it's not surprising. So, Dylan got his start rewriting old songs, which new words. Usually every song of his is lifted from somewhere. His artwork is basically a reinterpretation of photographs and such alike. And Chronicles is in the middle somewhere. He basically took an article and repurposed it for his own life. That's perverse, misleading, and brilliant. I myself, have had trouble painting and drawing, but using photographs and such as a guide has opened a new world for me and I can create something halfway decent. I and anyone can repurpose this tool for writing songs. It's kind of like putting a puzzle together. It's also sort of like magic, but yet so simple. I guess the best magic is the kind that was in front of you all the time and that's what the career of Bob Dylan has been, simply magic.

Author:  oldmanemu [ Tue February 23rd, 2016, 12:17 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

goodnitesteve wrote:
Johanna Parker wrote:
p.139 of the paperback. Dylan says a copy of Collier's magazine was in the studio as he recorded New Morning. However, the magazine had ceased publication years before. It's interesting, however, that the magazine serialized some of the Fu Manchu stories, from which Dylan generously quotes throughout Chronicles.
That's great.

That's a very interesting passage in Chronicles that I discuss in my blog: http://www.dreamtimepodcast.com/2009/08 ... g-bob.html


This is very interesting, but it's not surprising. So, Dylan got his start rewriting old songs, which new words. Usually every song of his is lifted from somewhere. His artwork is basically a reinterpretation of photographs and such alike. And Chronicles is in the middle somewhere. He basically took an article and repurposed it for his own life. That's perverse, misleading, and brilliant. I myself, have had trouble painting and drawing, but using photographs and such as a guide has opened a new world for me and I can create something halfway decent. I and anyone can repurpose this tool for writing songs. It's kind of like putting a puzzle together. It's also sort of like magic, but yet so simple. I guess the best magic is the kind that was in front of you all the time and that's what the career of Bob Dylan has been, simply magic.

agreed

Author:  Anr Bjotk [ Fri March 11th, 2016, 07:56 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Sphere wrote:
Maybe the Dead really did dose him in '87. They dosed about everybody else.


Wait, what? Bob talks about the Dead in Chronicles? And he was dosed? Maybe I oughta pick this up after all...

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Fri March 11th, 2016, 09:01 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Anr Bjotk wrote:
Sphere wrote:
Maybe the Dead really did dose him in '87. They dosed about everybody else.


Wait, what? Bob talks about the Dead in Chronicles? And he was dosed? Maybe I oughta pick this up after all...


He briefly jokes about maybe they did. He talks about the rehearsals for the '87 tour.

Author:  michael curtius [ Sat March 12th, 2016, 09:54 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Page 149: "The tour with Petty was broken up into parts and during one of the
layoffs, one of the organizers, Elliot Roberts, had set up some shows for me to do with
The Greatful Dead. I needed to go rehearse with the band for these shows, so I went
to San Rafael to meet with The Dead.
...
I could hear the breaks screech. ... I had no feelings for any of those songs
and didn´t know how I could sing them with any intent."

Author:  Anr Bjotk [ Sat March 12th, 2016, 09:57 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

michael curtius wrote:
Page 149: "The tour with Petty was broken up into parts and during one of the
layoffs, one of the organizers, Elliot Roberts, had set up some shows for me to do with
The Greatful Dead. I needed to go rehearse with the band for these shows, so I went
to San Rafael to meet with The Dead.
...
I could hear the breaks screech. ... I had no feelings for any of those songs
and didn´t know how I could sing them with any intent."


Thanks. Guess I really ought to get this book asap.

Author:  michael curtius [ Sat March 12th, 2016, 11:48 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

"Having children changed my life and segregated me from just
about everybody and everything that was going on.
Outside of my family, nothing held any real interest for me and
I was seeing everything through different glasses." p. 114

It´s like an island out of time for him, that period. Living with his family
at that time has been a main experience for his life.

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sat March 12th, 2016, 16:58 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

What's the story about the Chinese coming back? It sounds like something that could have come out of The Late Great Planet Earth, which Dylan must have read around 1979, but "Sun Pie's" 'preordained' story isn't exactly there.

Author:  michael curtius [ Sun March 13th, 2016, 07:27 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

Johanna Parker wrote:
What's the story about the Chinese coming back? It sounds like something that could have come out of The Late Great Planet Earth, which Dylan must have read around 1979, but "Sun Pie's" 'preordained' story isn't exactly there.

It´s just fun, reading that story about Sun Pie ... Reminds me to the style of Hemingway, the way of conversation, the interest for
the singularity of people. All the "preodained stories" end up in violence I think : "I was thinking that if Sun Pie was an active man, I´d go great lenghts to get out of his way." " Chinese, huh?" It ´s a bit unreal for me (now a leap to another topic ... sorry) ,that Bob performed in Bejing shortly - but he did. (Okay they catch some footballers nowadays too ...)
Daily Telegraph "The most extraordinarily intimate biography by a twentieth-century legend ever written". Think that´s ok though the whole thing would be stolen or invented, but it isn´t (only in parts - haha). For me it ´s an interesting thing, that he connects a lot of the stories in that book with the time in which they are located.

"New York City wasn´t New Orleans, though. It wasn´t the
city of astrology . It didn´t have any mysteries lurking in its
vast recesses,mysteries built when and by whom no man
could tell. New York was a city where you could be frozen to
death in the midst of a busy street and nobody would notice.
New Orleans wasn´t like that." p.210

Author:  Johanna Parker [ Sun March 13th, 2016, 10:31 GMT ]
Post subject:  Re: Chronicles Volume One revisited

What I'm asking is: Out of which book did he take it?

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