Expecting Rain

Go to main page
It is currently Mon October 23rd, 2017, 17:20 GMT

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 173 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 22:54 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue December 14th, 2010, 14:22 GMT
Posts: 43201
Location: Beneath the Southern X
20yearsofschooling wrote:
Why should parasitic nobodies like royals get a special mention, he acknowledged all the 'distinguished guests'? Sounds like you're just reaching for reasons to have a go and continue your 'Bob is rude' spiel now that he's confounded your expectations by delivering a gracious and warm speech.


Because the King of Sweden is the person from whom the laureates receive the award, and politeness and good form demand this to be acknowledged, no matter your personal opinion about the function of royalty in this country.

Confound my expectations? He didn't show up, but stole the other honorees's thunder in absence. He still gave no explanation of his reasons not to attend the ceremony. He knocked out and mailed in some sort of speech to be read by somebody completely unrelated to him or his work. Not unexpected, but certainly not gracious.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 22:55 GMT 
Mercury Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed September 14th, 2011, 13:25 GMT
Posts: 12324
Location: Wherever I am welcome
michael curtius wrote:
"Good evening, everyone. I extend my warmest greetings to the members of the Swedish Academy and to all of the other distinguished guests in attendance tonight.

I'm sorry I can't be with you in person, but please know that I am most definitely with you in spirit and honored to be receiving such a prestigious prize. Being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature is something I never could have imagined or seen coming. From an early age, I've been familiar with and reading and absorbing the works of those who were deemed worthy of such a distinction: Kipling, Shaw, Thomas Mann, Pearl Buck, Albert Camus, Hemingway. These giants of literature whose works are taught in the schoolroom, housed in libraries around the world and spoken of in reverent tones have always made a deep impression. That I now join the names on such a list is truly beyond words.

I don't know if these men and women ever thought of the Nobel honor for themselves, but I suppose that anyone writing a book, or a poem, or a play anywhere in the world might harbor that secret dream deep down inside. It's probably buried so deep that they don't even know it's there.

If someone had ever told me that I had the slightest chance of winning the Nobel Prize, I would have to think that I'd have about the same odds as standing on the moon. In fact, during the year I was born and for a few years after, there wasn't anyone in the world who was considered good enough to win this Nobel Prize. So, I recognize that I am in very rare company, to say the least.

I was out on the road when I received this surprising news, and it took me more than a few minutes to properly process it. I began to think about William Shakespeare, the great literary figure. I would reckon he thought of himself as a dramatist. The thought that he was writing literature couldn't have entered his head. His words were written for the stage. Meant to be spoken not read. When he was writing Hamlet, I'm sure he was thinking about a lot of different things: "Who're the right actors for these roles?" "How should this be staged?" "Do I really want to set this in Denmark?" His creative vision and ambitions were no doubt at the forefront of his mind, but there were also more mundane matters to consider and deal with. "Is the financing in place?" "Are there enough good seats for my patrons?" "Where am I going to get a human skull?" I would bet that the farthest thing from Shakespeare's mind was the question "Is this literature?"

When I started writing songs as a teenager, and even as I started to achieve some renown for my abilities, my aspirations for these songs only went so far. I thought they could be heard in coffee houses or bars, maybe later in places like Carnegie Hall, the London Palladium. If I was really dreaming big, maybe I could imagine getting to make a record and then hearing my songs on the radio. That was really the big prize in my mind. Making records and hearing your songs on the radio meant that you were reaching a big audience and that you might get to keep doing what you had set out to do.

Well, I've been doing what I set out to do for a long time, now. I've made dozens of records and played thousands of concerts all around the world. But it's my songs that are at the vital center of almost everything I do. They seemed to have found a place in the lives of many people throughout many different cultures and I'm grateful for that.

But there's one thing I must say. As a performer I've played for 50,000 people and I've played for 50 people and I can tell you that it is harder to play for 50 people. 50,000 people have a singular persona, not so with 50. Each person has an individual, separate identity, a world unto themselves. They can perceive things more clearly. Your honesty and how it relates to the depth of your talent is tried. The fact that the Nobel committee is so small is not lost on me.

But, like Shakespeare, I too am often occupied with the pursuit of my creative endeavors and dealing with all aspects of life's mundane matters. "Who are the best musicians for these songs?" "Am I recording in the right studio?" "Is this song in the right key?" Some things never change, even in 400 years.

Not once have I ever had the time to ask myself, "Are my songs literature?"

So, I do thank the Swedish Academy, both for taking the time to consider that very question, and, ultimately, for providing such a wonderful answer.

My best wishes to you all,

Bob Dylan"

source: Rolling Stone


Thank you michael curtius. It is a very heartwarming and humble speech. I've also caught up on reading the introductory speech for the Nobel and listened to Patti. Other than the nervous flubs, it was a touching tribute and the perfect song choice. (She should have had lyrics in front of her!!! But I still loved it.)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 22:56 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 19th, 2011, 12:06 GMT
Posts: 1149
Location: Wirral , UK sometimes canada sometimes spain
Has he already fulfilled his obligation to ' deliver a speech' or is something more required??

He didn't read it in person , but he certainly wrote and it's a ' proper speech' , not just a brief ' thankyou'


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 22:57 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue December 14th, 2010, 14:22 GMT
Posts: 43201
Location: Beneath the Southern X
As of this morning, they were expecting him to do something (and not just play a show) in spring.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 22:59 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun April 19th, 2015, 10:53 GMT
Posts: 1415
Finally, Dylan chose the best company:
two women as his spokespersons, Shakespeare as his colleague and a touch of ironic humor & paradox as excipient.

"Truly beyond words", dear Literature Laureate. Thanks for providing such a wonderful absence.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:07 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri June 29th, 2012, 14:26 GMT
Posts: 628
aberhwy61 wrote:
totally agree it took *something* to stop the performance and "recover" (only to butcher the succeeding verse more comically); but that was a bad, bad song choice. when they announced it 5 days ago, my literal first thought was "oh god, that's a long song with seemingly interchangeable lines and verses that are hard to remember, that's ripe for being screwed up". i've definitely personally witnessed bob flub that particular song a few times in 2000/2001. my gripe isn't with the fact that someone made a mistake but rather the decision making to pick that song. bob isn't performing one song a night when he flubs lyrics, so the comparison to his own missteps isn't apt. if he was picking one song a night to perform at concerts and he forgot the lyrics multiple times, then a) the comparison would be apt and b) i'm guessing people here would criticize him (justifiably so).

you don't pick hard rain unless you're beyond confident in your abilities to deliver it. per her own admission in an article i read this week, she was spending the week working on memorizing it. you can't be working on memorizing something and simultaneously have mastered it such that it would serve as an appropriate choice. she went out on the high wire (recklessly and needlessly in my opinion), the wire snapped and she fell right on her face.

"patti smith forgets bob's precious nobel worthy song lyrics, asks to restart as if in an elementary school recital, forgets lyrics again" is as fitting and ironic an ending to this entire nobel ruckus as one could have hoped for.


Completely agree. She fuct it up spectacularly but it makes the whole thing more interesting and seems oddly appropriate. Does make you realise how artfully Bob deals with his lyrical flubs.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:08 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 19th, 2011, 12:06 GMT
Posts: 1149
Location: Wirral , UK sometimes canada sometimes spain
cabanascaravan wrote:
Finally, Dylan chose the best company:
two women as his spokespersons, Shakespeare as his colleague and a touch of ironic humor & paradox as excipient.

"Truly beyond words", dear Literature Laureate. Thanks for providing such a wonderful absence.


Yes the US ambassador delivering a great speech from a great american gives you Americans, and the rest of us , something to celebrate before the potentially dark days ahead.


Last edited by cohenadmirer on Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:17 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:12 GMT 

Joined: Sat October 11th, 2008, 07:24 GMT
Posts: 35
Johanna Parker wrote:
A greeting addressed to the royal family would have been in order.


Are you for real? I´m living in a parallel universe and I like it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:13 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 19th, 2011, 12:06 GMT
Posts: 1149
Location: Wirral , UK sometimes canada sometimes spain
man in the moon wrote:
aberhwy61 wrote:
totally agree it took *something* to stop the performance and "recover" (only to butcher the succeeding verse more comically); but that was a bad, bad song choice. when they announced it 5 days ago, my literal first thought was "oh god, that's a long song with seemingly interchangeable lines and verses that are hard to remember, that's ripe for being screwed up". i've definitely personally witnessed bob flub that particular song a few times in 2000/2001. my gripe isn't with the fact that someone made a mistake but rather the decision making to pick that song. bob isn't performing one song a night when he flubs lyrics, so the comparison to his own missteps isn't apt. if he was picking one song a night to perform at concerts and he forgot the lyrics multiple times, then a) the comparison would be apt and b) i'm guessing people here would criticize him (justifiably so).

you don't pick hard rain unless you're beyond confident in your abilities to deliver it. per her own admission in an article i read this week, she was spending the week working on memorizing it. you can't be working on memorizing something and simultaneously have mastered it such that it would serve as an appropriate choice. she went out on the high wire (recklessly and needlessly in my opinion), the wire snapped and she fell right on her face.

"patti smith forgets bob's precious nobel worthy song lyrics, asks to restart as if in an elementary school recital, forgets lyrics again" is as fitting and ironic an ending to this entire nobel ruckus as one could have hoped for.


Completely agree. She fuct it up spectacularly but it makes the whole thing more interesting and seems oddly appropriate. Does make you realise how artfully Bob deals with his lyrical flubs.


I saw Mcartney in liverpool a few years ago .He fluffed some lines in ' Blackbird' . He stopped the song , acknowledged the mistake and restarted . At the end he said ' at least it shows it's live'. It's a good way of dealing with that situation.
When he loses his way , Dylan tends to mumble until he finds his way back . Occasionally he'll improvise some new lyrics to replace the ones he has temporarily forgotten.That's another way to do it .
Both ways are ok.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:16 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun April 19th, 2015, 10:53 GMT
Posts: 1415
cohenadmirer wrote:
cabanascaravan wrote:
Finally, Dylan chose the best company:
two women as his spokespersons, Shakespeare as his colleague and a touch of ironic humor & paradox as excipient.

"Truly beyond words", dear Literature Laureate. Thanks for providing such a wonderful absence.


Yes the US ambassador delivering a great speech from a great american gives you Americans something to celebrate before the potentially dark days ahead.


"You Americans"?! Shakespeare included? :o


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:22 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun June 19th, 2011, 12:06 GMT
Posts: 1149
Location: Wirral , UK sometimes canada sometimes spain
Well i'm British and also happy to celebrate Dylan's celebration of the bard.
As for potentially dark days ahead - i think you know what i mean.

All the essential stuff from this special day in one place
http://alldylan.com/bob-dylan-nobel-pri ... mance-etc/


Last edited by cohenadmirer on Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:33 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:31 GMT 

Joined: Fri July 18th, 2008, 16:22 GMT
Posts: 3999
Excellent speech in fairness. Not that it matters but I expect a lot of good will to be clawed back on foot of it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:39 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue December 14th, 2010, 14:22 GMT
Posts: 43201
Location: Beneath the Southern X
FWIW, the Dylan Archive is getting in on the action. Just received an email stating:

Quote:
Inside the Bob Dylan Archive with CBS Sunday Morning
Bob Dylan Archive subscribers,
The television show “CBS Sunday Morning” is scheduled to broadcast an extended story on the Bob Dylan Archive on Dec. 11, 2016. We do not have the time at which this particular segment will be aired.
A preview of the story, which is being reported by Jane Pauley, is being promoted at http://www.cbsnews.com/news/this-week-on-sunday-morning-dec-11/.
To determine what time “CBS Sunday Morning” airs in your city, visit http://www.cbsnews.com/news/sunday-morning-show-times/.
Thank you for your interest in all things Bob Dylan!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:40 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri June 29th, 2012, 14:26 GMT
Posts: 628
cohenadmirer wrote:

I saw Mcartney in liverpool a few years ago .He fluffed some lines in ' Blackbird' . He stopped the song , acknowledged the mistake and restarted . At the end he said ' at least it shows it's live'. It's a good way of dealing with that situation.
When he loses his way , Dylan tends to mumble until he finds his way back . Occasionally he'll improvise some new lyrics to replace the ones he has temporarily forgotten.That's another way to do it .
Both ways are ok.


Yes, Macca quite often restarts songs after a mistake, usually with a joke and a smile which puts everyone at ease, sometimes even releasing the results on his live records.

Save for when riding on the Mayflower, has anyone ever heared Bob actually stop and restart a song? Like you say he mumbles his way back in (usually pretty quickly) or invents new (sometimes nonsensical but oddly resonant) lyrics to catch the mistake.

Both ways minimise the impact of the error unlike Patti's excruciating performance tonight. I love her and part of me really admires the audacity of attempting such a difficult lyric when so under rehearsed. It's just if you are going to do that you have to style it out, a la Bob, when it goes wrong.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:46 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sun April 19th, 2015, 10:53 GMT
Posts: 1415
cohenadmirer wrote:
Well i'm British and also happy to celebrate Dylan's celebration of the bard.
As for potentially dark days ahead - i think you know what i mean.

All the essential stuff from this special day in one place
http://alldylan.com/bob-dylan-nobel-pri ... mance-etc/


I'm anything but a voice in a Dylan forum and I do not "celebrate" anything in those terms. Moreover, this is not the right place / not the right time to argue about "dark days". Look at the sun -or at the moon, perhaps- and stay happy.
Thanks for the link.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat December 10th, 2016, 23:57 GMT 

Joined: Tue March 8th, 2005, 12:56 GMT
Posts: 397
It occurs to me more and more how Hard Rain was just the perfect, perfect choice. Perhaps the only choice. It encapsulates everything, his sensitivity, his humanity, his sense of melody, his ability to write lyrics both anthemic and timeless as well as deeply personal. It is a song of journey, Homeric, the tale of the Heroes Journey. Further to that I listen to his performance from Nara in 1994 and I realise that way back in 1962 at the young age of 21 he had already effectively secured his Nobel there and then. At age 21! Before he'd even conceived his other mammoth works. That song alone really could end up being his crowning achievement, spoken of in hushed tones of rapture in 100 to 2000 years time. What a song. What a talent.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 00:06 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed December 4th, 2013, 06:39 GMT
Posts: 5764
Location: in the mystic garden
Love the speech. Very nicely written and he seems honored by the award


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 03:34 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Sat September 13th, 2008, 03:43 GMT
Posts: 4823
Nightingale's Code wrote:
Love the speech. Very nicely written and he seems honored by the award
He doesn't shy away from incorporating literary devices into his statement - well measured and thought provoking


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 05:05 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri April 14th, 2006, 18:43 GMT
Posts: 5370
what a tour de force!! i can't believe it!! i had no idea what he could possibly say - what a Grand Slam!!

radical non conformist Nobel laureates he mentions as his particular tribe of fellow laureates, wow, how Bold!

pitch perfect and Devastating gallows humor for the room, how courageous! Lenny Bruce applauds!
poor Yorick, jester :lol: --perfect.


on and on It. Is. Craft. Craft. Craft. that Matters not titles - wow, what chivalry! cuts like a razor!


"The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard," Katha-Upanishad, via W. Somerset Maugham.





the master of Exigency, so young and beautiful.

As the days go by,
Through each word and action,
Through each song and smile

thank you so much for giving us the road.


"As you talk, so is your heart." — Paracelsus


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 08:10 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Mon August 8th, 2011, 09:39 GMT
Posts: 1786
Location: Between Lincoln County Road and Armageddon
A good speech. Showing gratitude, humble, but also a few funny lines in between. I would have loved to hear it from the man himself. He could have delivered it in a great way. "Where do I get a human skull?" :lol:
The part where he talks about his audience is interesting. The difference between 50.000 (just one persona) and 50 (all different individuals). I never thought that he, on stage, might see us (the audience) that way.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 13:03 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue December 14th, 2010, 14:22 GMT
Posts: 43201
Location: Beneath the Southern X
WrittenInMySoul wrote:
The part where he talks about his audience is interesting. The difference between 50.000 (just one persona) and 50 (all different individuals). I never thought that he, on stage, might see us (the audience) that way.


The interesting thing about that, really, is how he connects this with the Nobel Committee.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 13:07 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Fri March 20th, 2009, 22:31 GMT
Posts: 762
Location: Pennsylvania
man in the moon wrote:
Save for when riding on the Mayflower, has anyone ever heared Bob actually stop and restart a song? Like you say he mumbles his way back in (usually pretty quickly) or invents new (sometimes nonsensical but oddly resonant) lyrics to catch the mistake.


There's a version of Standing in the Doorway from 2004 I think where he messes up the timing of the first line of the song. He doesn't stop the song but he goes back and sings the first line again in the correct timing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 13:51 GMT 
Promethium Member
User avatar

Joined: Fri July 15th, 2011, 02:23 GMT
Posts: 20929
Quote:
As a performer I've played for 50,000 people and I've played for 50 people and I can tell you that it is harder to play for 50 people.


(wonder how Patti interpreted this line?)
For a minute I thought Bob might mention that Concert for One from a recent year's (2014?) Philly pre-show...ha ha


The speech is fine. Bob was polite and it has worked out so far.

Will be interesting to see what he does to complete the Nobel obligations.
Also wonder what Bob will do with the proceeds.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 14:06 GMT 
Titanium Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu December 27th, 2012, 20:36 GMT
Posts: 8467
Location: over the shadows & the rain
"But it's my songs that are at the vital center of almost everything I do.
They seemed to have found a place in the lives of many people
throughout many different cultures and I'm grateful for that"

nice speech Jokerman :)
long may you run


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun December 11th, 2016, 14:43 GMT 
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 1st, 2008, 22:24 GMT
Posts: 79
Location: coast of barcelona
raging_glory wrote:
(She should have had lyrics in front of her!!! But I still loved it.)


I thought it was a great performance. Patty was obviously nervous, it was very tense at the beginning. Her hands, which usually sway with the music and lyrics, were motionless. I don't think it was a problem of rehearsing, just nerves. Patti has a pretty good memory but does depend on her specs for poetry readings and songs from time to time. I think she had the lyrics in front of her but opted not to wear her spectacles for the performance so the lyrics would have been a blur. She probably didn't want to read the lyrics to strengthen the presentation but nerves got to her in the end. At min 0:25 you can see she has a lyric stand in front of her. http://alldylan.com/bob-dylan-nobel-pri ... mance-etc/
Great song, great comeback & a great performance under intense pressure in honor of Bob.

edit: so much for the specs theory. at 3:10 you can see her lyric stand is empty.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 173 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: obviouslyonebeliever, train_of_love


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group