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PostPosted: Thu May 7th, 2015, 14:04 GMT 
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The Majestic:
It lives up to its name!

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Alice Cooper is about to enter his late-career renaissance, btw.


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Bob's spot under the stars

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The Majestic remains one of the finest atmospheric theatres ever built. Inspired by Spanish Mission, Baroque, and Mediterranean architectural traditions, theatre patrons are transported to a fantasy villa. Walls become towers with windows of colorful glass. A rare white peacock perches on a balcony railing as doves are caught in mid-flight. Grape vines creep along the walls and luscious foliage flourishes. The vaulted "sky" comes to life as stars twinkle while drifting clouds pass by overhead. Balconies, tile roofs, arches, and columns, railings, elaborate ornamentation, statues, and a bell tower all aid in the transformation of the theatre into a mystical village.


http://www.majesticempire.com/docs/defa ... f?sfvrsn=0

The land on which the office building-theatre complex now stands was leased to Karl Hoblitzelle from J. M. Nix, who had purchased it in 1920 from the Enterprise Company of Dallas. The land came with the curious deed restriction that, until April 5, 1928, "'neither aforesaid land nor any building or improvement or any part thereon shall be used or occupied for theatrical, motion picture, or amusement purposes at any time...'"[2]

Sufficiently exceeding the listed time restriction, the theatre's opening on June 14, 1929, in many ways symbolized a progressiveness with which San Antonio wished to identify. The city actually deemed the month of the opening "Prosperity Month," celebrating the recent era of development Texas was experiencing. In size, the Greater Majestic was second in the nation only to Atlanta, Georgia's Fox Theatre, and it was the first theatre in Texas to be fully air-conditioned, something that alone was a major attraction in the 1920s South. Advertisements heralding "'an acre of cool, comfortable seats'" were "further emphasized by the snow which topped the letters of the theatre's name,"[3] prompting society women to wear fur coats to the June opening.[4] The 4,000-seat theatre was filled to capacity for opening day entertainment, which consisted of the musical film, Follies of 1929 and live performances by Mexican Troubador Don Galvan, "The Banjo Boy," the "Seven Nelsons" acrobatic troupe, Eddie Sauer and his "Syncopaters," and the Father of Country Music, Jimmie Rodgers, who himself received 18 curtain calls.[5] Each week, the program offered included a new film and a new lineup of star performers. In 1930, the Great Depression caused the Majestic to close for several weeks, until it was able to reopen "because Americans were turning to movies for escape." The Majestic provided that escape with a schedule of films and live entertainment through the 1940s and 50s.[6]

Theatre features included a huge cast-iron canopy covering the sidewalk, a vertical sign 76-feet tall topped with "a strutting peacock ... walking as a huge ball rotated under his feet," and a cave-like single-story lobby that included copper lanterns, ceiling murals, and an aquarium filled with tropical fish.[7] Inside the theatre's auditorium were stuffed birds perched on balconies or frozen mid-flight via ceiling wire, replicas of well-known Greek, Roman, and Renaissance sculptures, and specially treated cypress trees brought from Spain and placed on upper-level niches. The Baroque tendency to decorate with mask-like faces is exemplified by carvings alongside the stage and under the mezzanine balcony, and in direct translation of atmospheric theater design, the Majestic's blue ceiling "cloud scape" disguises the interior dome as an evening sky in conjunction with a cloud projector and small bulbs simulating stars. The bulbs are actually positioned according to consultations with experts at the National Geographic Society, who instructed the designer as to the positioning of the real stars on the night of the theater's opening.



in case you were wondering about Atmospheric Theatres

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An atmospheric theatre is a type of movie palace that was popular in the 1920s in America. "Rather than seating the theatre patrons in a boxlike, formal setting as passive observers of stage entertainment, the atmospheric design transported them to an exotic European courtyard or garden. A plain cerulean sky replaced the ornate dome of traditional theatre design. Wispy floating clouds produced by a projector replaced crystal chandeliers and gilt. Trees, plants, vines and taxidermy birds replaced gold leaf. Arches, trellises, balconies and plaster statuary replaced marble, painted wood panels and crystal chandeliers. As the entertainment was about to begin, lighting effects created the illusion of a setting sun, as colors changed from yellow to red to mauve. Small lights, arranged in the ceiling in constellation patterns, twinkled to create a sense of infinite space. The atmospheric theatre design made the theatre patron an active, comfortable resident of an imaginary time and place, not a passive, aloof occupant of an oppressive formal space."[1]

The extravagantly designed theaters of the early twentieth century were expensive to build. These classically designed theaters required an elaborate auditorium ceiling, usually with one or more grand chandeliers. An atmospheric theater only required a simple, smooth dome with low-wattage lights to simulate twinkling stars. This is not to say atmospheric theaters were always simple in design. The side walls of the theaters often featured very complex elements that created a fantasy outdoor setting like being in a village, garden, or on the grounds of a grand palace.

The most successful promoter of the style was John Eberson. He credited the Hoblitzelle Majestic Theatre (Houston, 1923) as the first.[2] Before the end of the 1920s he designed around 100 atmospheric theatres in the U.S. and a few other countries, personally selecting the furnishings and art objects.


Atmospheric theatres in the United States :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_theatre


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PostPosted: Sat May 9th, 2015, 14:04 GMT 
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Many of the theaters on this tour have the pretty open sky effect, it seems?

One of the reasons they're so nice is that, for instance, in Atlanta- though you're in a busy neighborhood in a not huge setting, you get that lovely spacious feeling. Someone said the stars twinkle too, but I was so happy watching them on the stage I didn't see it. The effect reminds me of the moving sky in the mall at Caesar's Palace, but I think that one changes often, and day becomes night etc.

Though they're fascinating I like best the timeless look and feel of ones that have been restored to look like they originally did, like the Memphis Orpheum.


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PostPosted: Sat May 9th, 2015, 16:12 GMT 
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Orpheum was a perfect size and a thing of beauty. as are those skys.

this sound system seems to be another thing of beauty

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When The Joint, a 2,700-seat showroom at Tulsa, Okla.'s Hard Rock Hotel and Casino opened in 2010, it was equipped with a house audio system based around Meyer Sound's MICA line array loudspeakers. These arrays were judiciously hoisted on chain motors, as management wanted to offer the top-of-the-line touring acts who carry their own production the option of flying their own systems. In The Joint's first six months of operation, however, the MICAs have never budged.

"Everybody has used the MICAs," states Jason Jackson, entertainment and production manager at Hard Rock Tulsa. "The Doobie Brothers, Bad Company with Paul Rodgers, Vince Gill, Hall and Oates, Michael Bolton—if they had their own production, they left it on the truck."

The all-Meyer Sound installation finds the lion's share of its power in dual arrays of eight MICA line array loudspeakers per side, bolstered in the lows by eight 700-HP subwoofers. Six M'elodie line array loudspeakers serve as front fills and nine M1D line array loudspeakers are set up as VIP booth delays. Wedges are comprised of 16 UM-1P stage monitors, with two UPQ-2P narrow coverage loudspeakers and two JM-1P arrayable loudspeakers, plus 600-HP subwoofers available as drum and side fills. Drive and EQ is provided by Galileo loudspeaker management systems, with two Galileo 616 processors for the house and one Galileo 408 for the stage.

Design and integration for audio systems at The Joint and most other AV systems at the Hard Rock was performed by Las Vegas-based R2W, Inc. The company's David Starck, principal designer for The Joint's audio, notes that the Meyer Sound solution was a good fit for the budget as well as touring artists. "We looked at alternatives from other manufacturers," he recalls. "And like a lot of people, the management at first thought it might be too expensive. It wasn't. We looked at the bottom line costs, they were all within a few thousand dollars of each other."

Starck also notes that Meyer Sound's MAPP Online Pro acoustical prediction program also helped tilt the final decision. "It was a powerful tool that we could use to show the client exactly what sound they could expect in the room, rather than just, 'Here's an equipment list.'"

Jackson recently discovered that a complete Meyer Sound package even makes converts out of some former skeptics. "Vince Gill wanted to pull our M'elodie front fills and use his own," he recounts. "His tour management was adamant on that when advancing the show. But after they rolled in and took a listen, they left those boxes on the truck, too. It was the first time in years they'd done that."

The Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa is owned by the Cherokee Nation and operated under license from Hard Rock International. In addition to The Joint, the resort complex includes five restaurants, four nightclubs, more than 125,000 square feet of gaming, 350 luxury hotel rooms and suites, a golf course, and 35,000 square feet of convention space.



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if you think the Mad-Men esque colors on the outside are cool,
be sure to book your Tempest-themed room now!


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have a good sundown out West everyone.


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PostPosted: Tue May 12th, 2015, 09:02 GMT 
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Music Hall, Kansas City, State Unknown.

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Ever see a Ghost?

http://www.hauntedhouses.com/states/mo/music_hall.htm

Described as being one of Kansas City's "shining jewels," the Kansas City Music Hall is a first class theatre with an auditorium and balconies which provide seating for 2,400 patrons. The theatre has an impressive "orchestra pit, chorus dressing rooms, star dressing rooms, green room, and high-quality lighting and sound systems."

The '30s era ambiance" decor inside is beautiful and impressive to behold. The walls and floors are made of Italian marble, which go along beautifully with the "magnificent floor-to-ceiling murals and elaborate art deco chandeliers."


The Music Hall has a glorious, antique, 1927 pipe organ, originally used to provide background music for silent movies. The organ has an ivory and gold console, with more than 2,000 pipes, and has the ability to create a variety of special effects. This organ was built by the Robert-Morton Organ Company of Van Nuys, CA, during the time when theatres were built like palaces.

Though it was first installed in 1935, during the high point of the "Great Depression," it wasn't operational until the KCTPO agreed with the Kansas City government to allow a mutual use of the hall for "the Robert-Morton's rebirth."

Throughout the years, The Kansas City Music Hall has always been kept up it to look its best, to remain relevant as a performing stage location and never suffered a "long in the tooth" moment. Currently this grand theatre's stage and "fly" grid are being renovated in a massive overhaul effort, so the organ will be silent until May, 2007 or possibly later.

HISTORY OF MANIFESTATIONS:

The Kansas Music City Hall was created to be a glorious place to go to where one could escape the pain and troubles of this world and enjoy the performing arts in a first rate theatre with all the bells and whistles of the time. As there are no recorded deaths or suicides or murders committed in this building, one can assume from deduction or studying other theatre hauntings, the entities who come to enjoy the musical/dramatic/dance performances here loved coming to this theatre while alive and wish to continue to come and enjoy this piece of heaven found in this world.

Even if some of these entities may have lost their life in the area or neighborhood of this building, they still come to enjoy the performances perhaps to forget their issues for awhile which are keeping them from going to the other side.

MANIFESTATIONS:

There have been reports of many entities appearing in front of the patrons of this theatre.

These well-dressed entities discretely appear during performances probably wearing a variety of clothes styles from the 20th century. These performing arts spectral enthusiasts are probably well-mannered, not wanting attention by the living, but have come to enjoy the performances.

STILL HAUNTED?

Probably yes.

While there is no hard factual evidence, there are a lot of eye witness accounts coming from patrons. These alive and breathing theatre enthusiasts have noticed fellow theatre lovers who at first appeared to be real, live people, who suddenly disappear as it takes a lot of energy to appear in a solid, acceptable form which blends in with the living.


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PostPosted: Tue May 12th, 2015, 09:14 GMT 
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The Fox is marvelous, and there's lots of photos on the web to prove it.

http://www.fabulousfox.com/history.aspx


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PostPosted: Tue May 12th, 2015, 09:25 GMT 
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Cozy on up to the Riverside.

don't go to the Pabst by accident, but if you do, you're close.

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Milwaukee really doesn't care which is which when posting images of the venue,
so I don't really either.

DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY:

The Riverside Theater is one of 6 grand vaudeville/movie theaters designed and constructed during the 1920s by Classic theater specialists, Kirchoff and Thomas Rose, in the city of Milwaukee. They were picked to create this theater because of their marvelous work done on the Palace Theater in New York City. As of 2008, the Riverside Theater is the only classic theater which they designed that is still standing in Milwaukee, and still being used for theatrical and musical performances.

The Riverside Theater was built to be a fancy, grand-looking "presentation house" with 2,558 seats, which are located on the orchestra level, in a huge balcony via the elevator, and in three box seats on each wall below the organ screens. It originally was envisioned to be a vaudeville stage by RKO vaudeville promoters, but by the time it was built, vaudeville was "on its last legs," so a movie screen was added as well. It opened on April 29th, 1928, offering a mixture of vaudeville/theatrical presentations and movies as well.

The French baroque style, showcased in the theater's decorum, truly offered a wonderful place to escape the worries and troubles of life, while enjoying the entertainment offered. The theater's auditorium had 5 chandeliers, a 3 manual, 13 rank Wurlitzer theater pipe organ, and a glorious, giant central dome, with tri-color cove lighting, hidden by an ornate rim of cabochon-faced crests, to top it all off. The Grand Drapery used around the theater stage's proscenium arch had "20 swags of teal velour with its galloons in ochre, and tassels in henna red, laid upon a lambrequin of Austrian folds, with highlights in beige and fringed in henna. The beige teaser curtain hung in swags and jabots while the tormentors were in beige, framed in teal galloons." ( Cinema Treasures.org )

When Warner took over the theater, it's entertainment venue turned completely to film to pay the bills. United Artists Company was the next occupant of the theater, who did the same.

In the following years The Riverside Theater dodged two near fatal bullets.

In 1966, The Riverside Theater suffered a fire which destroyed the fancy draperies, swag and elaborate decor around the stage, but the theater was saved by automatic sprinklers, which retarded the fire until help could come. As the price tag to replace the original materials would be $590,000, a simple panel of dark red duvetyn with "30% fullness" was substituted for the destroyed swag and draperies.

United Artists were the next tenants, who, it is reported, "ran the theater into the ground." However it was the owners of this building, Towne Realty, who committed the sin of not wanting to work on building upkeep, letting this old dame sink into a run-down condition. Uh Oh! This isn't good. In 1982, United Artists didn't renew their lease, and the owner, Towne Realty had plans to tear the entire Empire Office building down, and build a shopping mall or a large parking structure. The Riverside was to suffer the fate of the other 6 Milwaukee theaters; a date with the wrecking ball. Horrified enthusiasts of building preservation quickly banded together to try to "Save The Riverside."

After hearing the pleas of preservationists to save The Riverside Theater, on a local radio station, the owner of Towne Realty, millionaire Joseph Zilber had a change of heart, regained his senses and threw the new construction plans into the trash can. Mr. Zilber contributed 1 and 1/2 million dollars to restore Milwaukee's old dame, The Riverside Theater.

The Riverside reopened with much celebration in 1984, as a full-fledged, theatrical stage theater, becoming a hot spot for touring Broadway shows and other touring groups, like Riverdance, and many well-known singers and musicians. While it wasn't quite as fancy and elaborate as the original theater decorum, it still was a beautiful theater with its newly lighted, gilded and re-draped auditorium, done in golds, and reds, offering a glorious slash of color and sparkle.

As of 2008, The Riverside Theater mainly offers musical groups, and comedians, with an occasional touring play or musical, but still is going strong as an entertainment venue.

HISTORY OF MANIFESTATIONS:

Like many old theaters, The Riverside Theater has its own spectral musical and dramatic arts fans who reside in the theater building, letting staff know that they are there, when the theater is empty of audiences. There are a variety of reasons why entities haunt theaters. Some of those reasons are listed below.

Performers or wanna-be performers in the arts who yearn for the stage:

( Pantages Theatre * Rialto Theatre * The Palace Theatre
Washington Opera House * Woodstock Opera House * Fitzgerald Theatre )

Conscientious Employees or Owners:

( Pantages Theatre * Harvard Exit Theatre
The Egyptian Theatre * The KiMo Theater * Tampa Theatre )

MANIFESTATIONS:

At least one known male and one female entity make The Riverside Theater their home.

A strong scent of floral perfume and the unmistakable aroma of cigar smoke have been noticed by staff, performers and patrons alike.

When the theatre is quiet and empty, these entities have made themselves plainly known in front of the staff.

The solid form of a male entity has been seen lying on the auditorium chairs, and standing in/walking down the aisles.

The feeling of being watched is strong at times.

The custodial staff which cleans the theatre during the wee hours of the morning have told the entities that they have work to do, and don't even react to paper mysteriously floating down from the ceiling, or turning their back on their cleaning supplies, and finding them moved from where they were last left.

STILL HAUNTED?

Yes indeed!

These theater enthusiasts continue to appear, tease and watch the living.


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PostPosted: Thu May 14th, 2015, 16:39 GMT 
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The current Tour locations are just somewhere beyond beautiful. You can almost feel the ghosts -kind of like going to the Carnton Plantation near Nashville.

Going to the shows at them presents a conundrum though-To buy shoes in order to have pretty shoes at a concert at a pretty venue, or to use the money to buy a seat!

Not that shoes would be noticed by anyone but the wearer, but prob every female knows that it makes her feel fancier to have on pretty shoes! However, in the Bob fan world, how could you run after the bus wearing heels?

Maybe I could shadow box and bob would think it was so funny he'd leave me a ticket and then I could buy the shoes, only, what if I bought the shoes, went to all the trouble of shadow boxing, and ended up with no ticket, And not being able to run after the Bus because of having on high heels? These are hard decisions.


Last edited by Belle Laugh on Thu May 14th, 2015, 16:49 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 14th, 2015, 16:44 GMT 
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and so the new perfume is out of the question. :)


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PostPosted: Fri May 15th, 2015, 09:12 GMT 
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Belle Laugh - great observations on both counts .
that's a lower blow than the mirrors from Bob's department: forcing his fans into such a mindf*ck of forced choice scenarios. they say in psychology that's the way to get to the meat of a person.


Another Fox on the Run:
Detroit, Michigan, May 15, 15

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Fox Theatre Detroit is a beautiful theatre in downtown Detroit, Michigan. Opened in 1928 as the flagship movie palace for the Fox Theatre Chain, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1988 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. The Fox has a capacity of 5,048 seats and plays host to many top shows and events.




The Detroit Fox was built by film pioneer William Fox and is now the largest surviving movie palace of the 1920s and the largest of the Fox Theatres that were originally built. When The Fox opened it was the second largest theatre in the world and it took 18 months to build. It was the first theatre in the world to be made with built-in equipment for talking movies using "Movietone" which was The Fox Film Corporation's patented sound-on-film system that allowed the theatre to show sound films from it's opening onwards.

The gala opening on September 21, 1928 started with a performance of "The Star Spangled Banner" by the Fox Theatre Grand Orchestra, followed by "The Evolution of Transportation" which was a live show depicting the history of Detroit from the 1700's to 1928. Then to showcase the built-in sound equipment for talking movies Fox Movietone news reel with sound was played, and lastly was the feature length silent film called ’’Street Angel’’ starring Janet Gaynor.

The Fox was designed by architect Charles Howard Crane, a Detroiter who designed 250 theatres in North America, 62 of those in the Detroit area. The theatre has a lavish interior with a blend of eastern motifs. The exterior has a 10-story marquee that overlooks Woodward Avenue. The stunning lobby covers half a block. The Fox was bought in 1987 by Olympia Entertainment, owned by Mike and Marion Ilitch and the building was fully restored to it's former glory in 1988 at a cost of $12 million. Ray Shepardson who oversaw the restoration stated that "The Detroit Fox is the most spectacular, over-the-top movie palace ever built".

The interior of the theatre is something to be experience just for its own sake. You enter into the outer foyer through the brass doors and make your way into the colossal grand lobby which covers 3,600 squre feet and rises six stories high. The main auditorium was designed by Eve Leo, the wife of William Fox (the movie mogul who owned hundreds of movie houses in the country of which the Fox Theatre in Detroit was the grandest) and features Egyptian, Indian and Oriental motifs, such as the elephant's head in the center of the proscenium. The auditorium is 104 ft high and 175 ft wide and has 2,898 orchestra-level seats, with more on the upper level seating area.

As well as serving as Detroit's premier movie house until the 1980's, The Fox has a rich history of top class live productions and performances. In the 1930's Shirley Temple made many appearences when the theatre featured her films. In May 1956 The Fox hosted three performances by Elvis Presley to a total audience of 12,500 screaming fans.

Many Motown artists performed on stage in the 1960's, and from the early 60's onwards Berry Gordy's Motown Revue was an annual Christmas Tradtion lasting over the Christmas to New Year's period with four or five performances every day featuring Detroit talent such as The Temptations, The Supremes and Smokey Robinson. The theatre showed many blaxploitation and martial arts films during this decade.

After the restoration, The Fox reopened in 1988 with Smokie Robinson and the Count Basie Orchestra. A year later Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Liza Minnelli appeared in concert. Live productions have included Sesame Street Live, David Copperfield, Donny Osmond and Riverdance. Musicians and comedians to have graced the stage include Prince, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld, Cher and Kanye West.

At present The Fox, which is also aptly known as the "Temple of Amusement" continues to serves as a premier entertainment venue in Detroit for concerts, comedy acts, musicals and other live productions.

Please note the following when attending the Fox Theatre Detroit:

The theatre opens 60 minutes before the scheduled event and it is recommended to arrive at least 30 minutes before the start as this allows time for security checks and for you to find your seats.
Audio-visual equipment such as cameras are not permitted in the theatre, unless the artist has the preference to allow them. Please contact 313 471 3200 to find out if the event you are attending allows audio-visual equipment.
Courteous security checks are carried out upon arrival which include walk-through metal detector and bag inspection.
Prohibited items include weapons, aerosol cans, outside food and beverages, pocket knives and utility tools, laser light pointers, bottles and cans, large bags and coolers.
For lost and found please contact 313 47 6490.
Fire exits are indicated by the red lighted signs.
Hearing aid devices are available on a first come first serve basis as a complimentary service. Drivers license or Picture I.D. is required.
Please do not use cell phones in the auditorium.
To contact a patron please contact 313 471 6490 with the name and seating location of the person you are trying to contact.
First aid is available at every event.
ATM's are located in the main floor and mezzanine.
Parking is available at the Fox Parking Structure with 1,100 parking spaces, including 32 handicapped parking spaces. The structure is located between Woodward Avenue and Park Street.
Food and beverages are permitted in the auditorium for all events unless explicitly stated.
Elevators to the mezzanine and galleries are located to the right of the grand lobby.
Restrooms are located on lower level lounge areas for main floor patrons and for mezzanine and gallery patrons the left and right side of the theatre.
Smoking is prohibited inside the theatre. There are designated smoking areas outside the building.

Follow @DetroitFox



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[img[img]]http://www.waterwinterwonderland.com/images/moviehouse/597/f1^auditorium.jpg[/img][/img]


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awe screw it, just read/view this page,
http://www.scottymoore.net/detroit56.html
you won't regret it.

and this one
http://www.waterwinterwonderland.com/mo ... spx?id=597


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[img][img]http://www.waterwinterwonderland.com/images/moviehouse/597/a02^Old_shot_from_Wayne_state_library.jpg[/img][/img]


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PostPosted: Fri May 15th, 2015, 11:27 GMT 
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Belle Laugh wrote:
Going to the shows at them presents a conundrum though-To buy shoes in order to have pretty shoes at a concert at a pretty venue, or to use the money to buy a seat!

Not that shoes would be noticed by anyone but the wearer, but prob every female knows that it makes her feel fancier to have on pretty shoes! However, in the Bob fan world, how could you run after the bus wearing heels?

Maybe I could shadow box and bob would think it was so funny he'd leave me a ticket and then I could buy the shoes, only, what if I bought the shoes, went to all the trouble of shadow boxing, and ended up with no ticket, And not being able to run after the Bus because of having on high heels? These are hard decisions.


A Merry Llama wrote:
Belle Laugh - great observations on both counts .
that's a lower blow than the mirrors from Bob's department: forcing his fans into such a mindf*ck of forced choice scenarios. they say in psychology that's the way to get to the meat of a person.


you write just like bobschool sometimes

but anyway ...

for me, it's no contest, and the shoes mean nothing in contrast to driving 80,000 miles for another opportunity to see those Big Black Buses with their windows darkened.

Can you wave at the buses? and Which one do you blow the kiss at? What if you blow the kiss at his manager's bus and he makes sure you sit out the concert in the lobby. What if Bob'll see the waving and hate it so much he'll sic one of those "dogs that can tear you limb to limb". Don't do that Bob...I know there's no force needed!

guess you just have to start and don't know til you're walking if you made the right choice- tennis shoes or sandals. Personally, I'd look better shadow boxing in sandals, but shadow boxing isn't everything.


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PostPosted: Fri May 15th, 2015, 18:13 GMT 
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Belle Laugh wrote:


you write just like bobschool sometimes

but anyway ...



until the ups truck arrived today, I was about to post this comment in the 'things that made my day today' thread.
i still might, we'll see just how good this new My Morning Jacket is.


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PostPosted: Sat May 16th, 2015, 18:07 GMT 
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another Beauty rounding out the tour in Columbus!

(and i'm not talking about Sweet Melinda)

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Palace for the Average Man

When Scottish-born architect, Thomas W. Lamb, designed the Ohio Theatre, he envisioned “a palace for the average man.” The Ohio Theatre opened in 1928—a Loew's movie house that was a 2,779-seat Spanish-Baroque masterpiece—complete with its own orchestra and theatre organ. In addition to the movies, live stage shows touring on the Loews circuit found a home on the Ohio stage. During the heyday of vaudeville, many top performers crossed the Ohio's stage, including Milton Berle, Ray Bolger, Cab Calloway, Buddy Ebsen, Martha Raye, Jean Harlow, Ginger Rogers, Kate Smith, and a young emcee with a violin named Jack Benny.

A Woman’s Touch

To decorate and furnish the Ohio, Loew's chose Anne Dornan, one of the first women to graduate from the Columbia School of Architecture. Dornan traveled around the world to select art and furnishings, even going on a safari to find appropriate decorations for the "Africa Corner" in the lower lounge of the Ohio. Approximately $1,000,000 was spent on art and furnishings -- more than the cost of the building itself!
Save the Ohio!

The Ohio Theatre thrived as a movie house until the suburban sprawl of the 1960s drew traffic out of downtown. Like many other grand theatres of the past, the Ohio was headed for demolition. In 1969, the citizens of central Ohio mounted a “Save the Ohio” campaign, raising over 2 million dollars in less than a year in an unprecedented effort. The newly formed Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) subsequently purchased and renovated the Ohio Theatre, creating a home for Columbus' performing arts institutions that is the busiest performing arts facility in Ohio.

Ohio’s Theatre

Today, the Ohio Theatre is home to The Columbus Symphony Orchestra, BalletMet, and The Broadway Series, as well as more than 100 CAPA events each year, including music from all genres and corners of the world, dance, theater, comedy, children's entertainment, and the time-honored Summer Movie Series. The Ohio Theatre's lush interior, excellent acoustics, and state-of-the-art stage facilities have made it a favorite of performers and patrons alike, and recent renovations to the backstage and dressing rooms guarantee that the Ohio Theatre will continue its grand tradition as the “Official Theatre for the State of Ohio.”


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PostPosted: Sun May 17th, 2015, 11:31 GMT 
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South Bend baby: it's world class.

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On October 25, the Music and Theater/Dance Departments joined the South Bend Symphony Orchestra at the Morris Performing Arts Center in "A Tribute to Leonard Bernstein."

The concert featured faculty members Jessica McCormack and James Bowyer in a concert version of the Broadway musical Candide. Student soloists Tamra Garrett, Julius Williams, Lawrence Mitchell Matthews, Carmelo Rosario, Mia Foster, and Katie Andrysiak performed in a concert version of West Side Story. The IU South Bend Chorale, Chamber Singers, and The Symphonic Choir of South Bend provided the choral background.

In addition, the IU South Bend Dance Company performed The Symphonic Dances of West Side Story with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra.

"All of the soloists, choir, and dancers were IUSB students or faculty and it was history making," said Marvin Curtis, dean of the Ernestine M. Raclin School of the Arts. "It showed the public that we have the talent and the ability to perform in a variety of settings. I felt like a proud parent that evening as I watched out students take command of the Morris Performing Arts Center working with a professional orchestra in such a glorious setting



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remember the Alamo!


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"feeling better little monkee? Now let's have a good day!"

(from one of Llittle Llama's books)



Historic Timeline
(not the difficulty in figuring out what's historical as the years grow more contemporary)

1922: On November 2nd, The Palace Theatre opens as South Bend’s newest venue on the Orpheum Theatre Circuit featuring Vaudeville and silent movies.

1923-1929: Vaudeville reigns with performances from Harry Houdini, Burns & Allen, Eddie Foy and the Seven Little Foys, “The Little Rascals,” and Amos & Andy. And, the first movie with sound plays the Palace (1929).

1930-1950: The Palace is the place to go for plays and movies from 25 cents every day of the week and newsreels and cartoons on Saturday mornings.

1940: On October 4th, “Knute Rockne All American” starring Ronald Regan as George Gipp (“The Gipper”) and Pat O’Brien as Knute Rockne has its world premier at the Palace. Thousands line the streets for this star-studded event. Hollywood stars in attendance include Ronald Reagan, Bob Hope, Jane Wyman, Kate Smith, Pat O’Brien and Rudy Vallee.

1951-1958: The Palace struggles to stay open and hosts only a few events including The Seven Year Itch and the Gene Autry Show.

1959: Due to the popularity of television and the decline in the number of theatre goers, the Palace Theatre Board votes to demolish the theatre. Unable to part with the grand house, Mrs. Ella Morris, a local philanthropist and patron of the arts, purchases the Palace for an undisclosed sum and resells it to the City of South Bend for the sum of $1.00.

1960: The Palace is renamed the Morris Civic Auditorium. The South Bend Symphony makes the Morris its home.

1961-1965: The Morris Civic Auditorium slowly begins a revival with the new resident users, Broadway Theatre League and South Bend Symphony Orchestra bring in patrons back to the theater.

1963: Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong and Orchestra play the Morris Civic.

1966-1967: A remarkable season at the Morris Civic with performances from the Beach Boys, James Brown, Johnny Cash, Guy Lombardo, Lovin Spoonfuls, Betty Grable in “Hello Dolly,” and Victor Borge.

1968-1969: Marvin Gaye plays the Morris Civic and James Brown returns for the fourth year in a row.

1970: Hank Williams, Will Rogers, Stevie Wonder and Jerry Lee Lewis visit the Morris Civic this year.

1971-1972: The season starts with the Lettermen and ends with Cheech & Chong.

1973: The busiest season since the 1930s, the Morris Civic hosts Van Cliburn, REO Speedwagon and the Glenn Miller Orchestra.

1974: The Eagles, Bachman Turner Overdrive, Mott the Hoople, ZZ Top, Blue Oyster Cult, Kansas, Aerosmith, and Styx rock the Morris.

1975: Classic ‘70s with the Bill Gather Trio, Conway Twitty, Marshall Tucker Band, Average White Band, Loretta Lynn, Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention, Lou Reed, the Carpenters, Fleetwood Mac, Aaerosmith with Rush, Sha-Na-Na and Foghat all appearing.

1976-1977: Crowds flock the Morris to see Ted Nugent, Arlo Guthrie, Rush, the Funkadelics, Heart and Kool and the Gang.

1979: The Morris welcomes Harry Chapin, “Grease,” B.B. King, Robert Palmer, Judas Priest, Freddie Fender, Cameo and Southold Dance Theater performs their first “Nutcracker” ballet that December.

1980: Todd Rungren, Eddie Money and the Mohammed Ali Fight Telecast make up a variety of Morris events.

1985: On June 5th, the Palace Theatre building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and Indiana Register of Historic Sites and Structures.

1981-1986: George Thorogood, REO Speedwagon and Styx return several times to rock the Morris.

1987-1989: Broadway is big in the late ‘80s with Ben Vereen starring in Pippin, the first appearance of the musical Cats and Debbie Reynolds performs.

1990: Chess is the largest musical to date on the Morris Stage – so large that the first night’s show was over two hours late in starting while crews worked feverishly to get ready.

1991: Rock legend, Bob Dylan, plays the Morris.


1992: Tool Man Tim Allen and magician, David Copperfield, play to sold-out audiences.

1993-1996: Bad Company, Kenny G, Harry Connick Jr., and Hootie and the Blowfish all perform.

1997: Smokey Joe’s Café is the last performance before renovations.

1998: The stage house is demolished as workers prepare for extensive $16.7 million renovations.

2000: In February, renovations are completed after having been closed for over 26 months. On March 3rd, the newly renamed Morris Performing Arts Center hosts a ribbon cutting ceremony and “Chicago” musical for renovation donors to recognize their contributions to the fundraising. On March 19th, the Morris opens to rave reviews with a grand reopening community celebration featuring actor Ben Vereen. For the first time in the history of the theater, the Morris was listed on Pollstar Magazine's Top 100 Theaters Worldwide (based on ticket sales.)

2001: Sold-out shows include country star, Jo Dee Messina who opens her first headline tour and comedians Jerry Seinfeld, George Carlin, and Carrot Top; also Blues Clues, Hoosier Lottery, “Can a Woman Make a Man Lose His Mind?”

2002: Blue Collar Comedy Tour with Jeff Foxworthy sold out. On December 31st, The Palais Royale (ballroom of the Morris Center) reopens with a grand New Year’s Eve dinner/dance celebration following an extensive $6.9 million renovation after being closed and unused since 1968.

2003: Sold-out shows include band Chicago, Anne Murray; comedian Jerry Seinfeld; and motivational speaker Zig Ziglar. And, the Morris Bistro Restaurant opened in the lower level as “the Place to Go Before the Show” offering dinner before most evening performances and private events for up to 100 people.

2004: Sold-out shows include rock band Godsmack and jazz singer Harry Connick, Jr.; and the Broadway show Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding.

2005: On November 2nd, the unveiling ceremony held for the new $689,021 state-of-the art electronic marquee funded completely by donations from the community to Morris Entertainment, Inc. The new marquee replaces the original one that was removed from the building sometime in the late 1950s by previous owners and was temporarily replaced by a flat reader board. The new 57’ wide marquee, designed by Wagner Electric Sign Company of Elyria, Ohio, includes chaser lights, search lights, and a full color Daktronics ProStar display. Sold-out shows this year include: rock bands Styx and Alice Cooper; comedians Bill Engvall, Jerry Seinfeld and Larry the Cable Guy; Gospel band Gaither Vocal Band; and teen heartthrob Jesse McCartney.

2006: On February 15th, pop/rock band The Moody Blues holds rehearsals for its new spring world tour and performs their first concert of the tour at the Morris. And on November 24th, Country artist Kenny Rogers rehearses and performs his first concert of his new “Christmas & Hits” show at the Morris. And, sold-out shows include: pop/rock artists Moody Blues, Chicago, Lynyrd Skynyrd, REO Speedwagon with Blue Oyster Cult, Staind, James Taylor; country artist Trace Adkins and Loretta Lynn; Christian bands Casting Crowns; comedians Friends of Bob & Tom; and Blue Man Group show.

2007: On May 10th, Economic Impact Study completed by Saint Mary’s College Department of Business Administration and Economics and Mathematics shows that the Morris has a $5.9 million economic impact on the City of South Bend. Sold-out shows include rock bands Goo Goo Dolls, Godsmack, ZZ Top; comedians Carlos Mencia, Ron White, Friends of Bob & Tom; and the show Celtic Woman.

2008: Sold-out shows include musical groups Crosby, Stills & Nash, Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons, and Mannheim Steamroller; and comedians Jeff Dunham and Bob & Tom Comedy All-Stars.

2009: On February 27th, Blues artist Bonnie Raitt rehearses and performs her first concert of her new spring tour at the Morris. And, Sold-out shows this year include: rock bands Styx with Kansas and comedians Robin Williams and Jerry Seinfeld.

2010: On February 20th, all free tickets given out for the Morris Live! Presents “10th Year Celebration – Thank You South Bend” to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Morris renovations. A crowd of more than 1,500 people attends the event featuring a wide variety of area artists who donats their time and talent for the event. And, sold-out shows this year include: jazz singer Harry Connick, Jr.; rocker John Mellencamp; musical groups Straight No Chaser and Mannheim Steamroller; and comedians Ron White and Cheech & Chong.

2011: Sold-out shows include musical artists James Taylor, Darius Rucker, Straight No Chaser, and The Avett Brothers. And, renovations totaling $717,000 were completed on grand lobby front entrance doors, grand lobby windows, and lower level restrooms and restoration of original 1921 exterior north brick wall was completed.

2012: Sold-out shows include: country artist Trace Adkins and two sold out performances by comedian Daniel Tosh.

2013: In June, Economic Impact Study completed by Saint Mary’s College Department of Business Administration and Economics shows that the Morris Performing Arts Center (theater and ballroom) had a $10.5 million economic impact on the City of South Bend in 2012. This figure includes a total direct spending inside and outside the Morris and the Palais Royale. It was determined that the Morris (theater) alone had a $6.7 million impact in 2012. And, a record-breaking 16 performances each were held of Broadway blockbuster shows Wicked May 8-19 and Jersey Boys November 26-December 8. Sold-out shows include: Harry Connick, Jr.; Earth, Wind and Fire; and the acappella sensation Straight No Chaser. And, filming for the new Celtic Woman “Emerald: Musical Gems” DVD to be released and aired on PBS stations in 2014 films at the Morris during the Celtic Woman “Believe” show on April 9. Dramatic lighting is used in the theater which showcases the beautiful architectural highlights of the historic venue. Audience members are treated to some delightful encore music and dance performances as the producers film “retakes” for the new DVD.

2014: Sold-out shows to date include: Aziz Ansari, Disney Live! “Mickey’s Music Festival," Move Live On Tour and Theresa Caputo.

2015: On January 21st, Rock & Roll Hall of Famer John Mellencamp rehearses and opens his 2015 North American “Plain Spoken Tour” with a sold-out concert at the Morris. Another sold-out show to date includes Disney Live.

http://www.morriscenter.org/history.php
there's a 360 tour in there, but i don't think there's a live feed. too bad.


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PostPosted: Fri July 10th, 2015, 11:46 GMT 
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Bumping this as Europe generally offers some pretty incredible scapes.

That Red Rocks Rome scene looked pretty enticing among many others!


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PostPosted: Sat July 16th, 2016, 18:49 GMT 
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Location: Merry Christmas & missin' The Mirror Girl
Depending on Autumn this may make a comeback :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon July 18th, 2016, 00:27 GMT 
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Fingers crossed (or Daumen drücken)!


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PostPosted: Mon July 18th, 2016, 15:44 GMT 
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Lisa wrote:
Fingers crossed (or Daumen drücken)!


And auf Holz klopfen, too.


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PostPosted: Mon July 18th, 2016, 16:56 GMT 
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on my head klopfen


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PostPosted: Tue July 19th, 2016, 03:47 GMT 
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Lisa wrote:
on my head klopfen


:lol: :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Mon July 25th, 2016, 11:04 GMT 
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Location: over the shadows & the rain
July 2 - Tanglewood Lenox, MA
the shed


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PostPosted: Mon June 26th, 2017, 20:15 GMT 
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Location: Merry Christmas & missin' The Mirror Girl
We will have to bring this back :)

I liked all the photos :)


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PostPosted: Mon June 26th, 2017, 20:26 GMT 
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I'll go next. Best Bob venue in Ages!
Can't say enough good about how hassle-free, simple, genuine, family-oriented and FUN this venue is!
Makes me never want to bother with another urban concert.
No bullshit. Park free. Easy access. Do what you want as long as you respect others.
VT gets it.
Shelburne Museum on the Green is highly recommended!

http://www.benjerry.com/whats-new/2017/06/bob-dylan


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PostPosted: Tue June 27th, 2017, 03:26 GMT 
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shooting_star_night wrote:
We will have to bring this back :)

I liked all the photos :)

Beautiful day at Hudson river in Kingston, NY
those are fragments of old bricks from Hutton brickyards on the beach at Kingston Point Beach :)

"EPILOGUE FOR A DEPARTED INDUSTRY
The Hudson River brick industry went down before an array of overwhelming forces, including large demographic changes, competition by new technologies, and by brickmakers in distant locations that had achieved access to the New York market, as well as new environmental standards. During its lifetime, nothing can gainsay that industry’s indispensable contribution to the very existence of New York City, where the record of that accomplishment is everywhere to be seen. With the exception of IBM, there is nothing comparable to that industry in the Hudson Valley today in terms of size and consequence of its production ...."
http://brickcollecting.com/hutton.htm
http://brickcollecting.com/hutton_book.htm


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PostPosted: Wed August 9th, 2017, 16:41 GMT 
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Location: over the shadows & the rain
http://www.colonywoodstock.com/
wishful thinking Dylan venue - Colony in Woodstock, NY
reopened a couple of months ago

https://hudsonvalleyone.com/2017/05/01/ ... woodstock/
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PostPosted: Fri September 1st, 2017, 22:32 GMT 
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Location: Manchester England
Some truly stunning venues posted.
Sadly, my hometown, Manchester England, Dylan's been playing
the Arena (making headlines this year with the disgraceful bombing that took place there)
It's large, so fits a lot of his fans in there, but i always preferred it when he
played Manchester's Apollo Theatre


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