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PostPosted: Mon April 13th, 2015, 00:19 GMT 
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Richmond, Virginia Altria Theater

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does this resemble the current demographic of the bob tourbase?

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red red wine tonight


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PostPosted: Mon April 13th, 2015, 00:21 GMT 
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A Merry Llama wrote:
Richmond, Virginia Altria Theater

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does this resemble the current demographic of the bob tourbase?


No. Too young...


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PostPosted: Tue April 14th, 2015, 15:23 GMT 
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Not many pics of the venue in Savannah, or SCADtown as I like to call it.
But here an example of how they get into it for Derek Trucks, so that's cool.


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PostPosted: Wed April 15th, 2015, 19:25 GMT 
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Montgomery's Performing Arts Center looks really sweet actually

certainly small enough to allow good sound to hit nearly every seat.

and a nice angle to the row ramp.
i could only pick out maybe a row and a half where i wouldn't enjoy sitting.
i suppose those would be good ones for dancing!



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plus, an easy commute to your room!

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The Montgomery Performing Arts Centre, a spectacular multi-million-dollar facility, is part of the luxurious new Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center. With its state of the art design, elegant architecture, and cutting edge technology it will offer the perfect setting for performances. We will provide the ultimate theatrical experience for enthusiasts and tourists from around the south and the nation. The Performing Arts Centre has the amenities and capabilities of some of the most prestigious theaters in the southeast; in addition to the 1,800 seat capacity the centre includes 4,000 square feet of pre-function space for special events. As a Level 1 theater, it can accommodate first run Broadway touring shows, which normally involve six to ten trucks and four to five buses of equipment, props, cast and crew. The theater has one green room, three star dressing rooms, three large dressing rooms, one wardroom, one rehearsal room, and one crew room. The audio system is comparable to that of elite performing theaters around the nation. The system is engineered and designed so that every seat has front row quality. Please download information on upcoming shows in the “document gallery.”

Located in Downtown historic Montgomery and connected to the Convention Center, the hotel design is inspired by New York’s Plaza Hotel and is the vibrant heart of Montgomery’s new city center. More than 70,000 square feet of meeting space is under renovation and will be available February 2008.
Holding thousands of people, this space is perfect for larger conferences and has plenty of exhibition space. A 14,000 square foot ballroom on the hotel’s main level will be one of Alabama’s largest and was designed with the meeting planner in mind. The ballroom can hold more than 1,500 in theatre seating and 1,160 for banquets.

it's near a park and a river, what more does a person need?


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PostPosted: Wed April 15th, 2015, 19:33 GMT 
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Teatro de La Axerquía - Córdoba - Spain

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next summer

Don't you dare miss it.. ;)


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PostPosted: Thu April 16th, 2015, 17:34 GMT 
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Jesus - Jesus, that's beautiful

I do hope more people will capture the European venues this summer.
use of space certainly make the place.


Here's what's Coming Up in Charleston:

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be sure to cross this bridge when you get to it. One of the most wonderful moments in my bridging life.
go out of your way to do it if you need to. F* the Golden Gate and its crossing fee.

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Ravenel said that he had run for the state Senate in 1996 specifically to seek funding for a new bridge between Charleston and Mount Pleasant to replace the John P. Grace Memorial Bridge and Silas N. Pearman Bridge. Both bridges were nearing the end of their useful lives, and had been criticized as safety hazards. Due to his efforts on passing laws for the new bridge's funding, fellow lawmakers voted to name the cable-stayed bridge in Charleston the Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge. Some felt that the bridge should not be named after Ravenel, with the head of the South Carolina infrastructure bank saying in 1999, "Certainly, Arthur Ravenel is a fine, decent person, but that bridge is bigger than any one individual and it should reflect all the qualities of the state and not some state senator who happens to be in the Legislature the time the structure is being built."[1]
Ravenel is a member of Moultrie Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans, and is a supporter of the Confederate flag being flown at the South Carolina statehouse. He provoked controversy at a rally for the flag in 2000 when he referred to the NAACP as the “National Association for Retarded People”.[2] Ravenel upset even more people after he apologized to mentally handicapped people for comparing them to the NAACP. Many called for the Charleston bridge to be renamed.[1]
Ravenel once said that his fellow white congressional committee members operated on "black time", which he characterized as meaning "fashionably late".[3]



http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/imag ... rry_44.jpg


The Flaming Lips elevated the joy
A review of the Lips' theatrical, confetti-filled concert at the PAC

By T. Ballard Lesemann


JOSHUA CURRY

Wayne Coyne and the Flaming Lips at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center, 2011



The Flaming Lips
North Charleston Performing Arts Center
Oct. 28

The Flaming Lips concert at the Performing Arts Center might be remembered as one of Charleston's most visually stimulating and joy-filled musical events of the year. The Oklahoma-based band's demented, polished, and love-themed variety show was more than politely received. Kudos to the venue for bravely hosting such a wild rock 'n' roll circus.

A typical Lips show is more of a theatrical piece of performance art (on great acid) than it is a standard rock show. Frontman Wayne Coyne, the group's main guitarist back in its early days, conducted the whole affair like a cheerful ringleader with a sermon of love in his mind.

A loud but cheerful mix of local hippies, punks, weirdos, and old-school Lips fans carried on in full party mode in the PAC lobby shortly after doors opened. The unannounced openers Talkdemonic — an electronic violinist/drummer duo from Portland, Oregon — played a rhythmic, hypnotic, and mostly instrumental set as folks milled around in the theater seats. Nearly half of the attendees showed up in extravagant Halloween costumes, which enhanced the carnivalesque atmosphere.

With the stage lights on neutral white, all four members of the Flaming Lips — Coyne, bassist Mike Ivins, keyboardist/guitarist Steven Drozd, and drummer Kliph Scurlock — helped their roadies assemble gear and props during the intermission. Coyne returned to the stage with house lights up to welcome the audience. He chuckled as he warned fans in the first few rows about the strobe-lights and lasers. Then the lights went down, and the video screen lit up.

The rhythm section walked on stage via a ramp from the middle of the screen. Coyne literally got the ball rolling during the first song (a zany rendition of Black Sabbath's "Sweet Leaf") as he performed his trademark crowd surfing from inside an oversized hamster ball. The Lips team dropped and blasted ribbons of confetti, fog, and huge balloons into the audience while an orange-tinged video clip of a nude pixie danced across the semicircular screen. It was a dramatic, interactive, and exhilarating opening.

Coyne had his own mini camera mounted on his mic stand, which allowed for some great close-ups on the big screen. Two gangs of dancing ladies dressed as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz assembled on both sides of the stage. from For all of the theatrics, the backing members of the band stood in place and confidently took care of their instrumental duties. Drozd had his hands and arms full of various guitars as he switched from strumming to pressing keys and buttons on his battery of synths and samplers. Ivins stood and sat stoically at stage left through the show. Scurlock bashed a basic four-piece kit with Bonham-like power and grace.

Coyne, however, delivered the genuine feeling and passion at the heart of the performance. He repeatedly urged fans to "receive and push back the love," often beckoning them with a smiling "Come on, motherfuckers!"

Highlights in the main set included a lengthy version of the 1994 single "She Don't Use Jelly" (fans shouted the line "She uses Vaseline!" with Coyne during each chorus), a mellowed-out "Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots Pt. 1," and a string of acoustic numbers. On the spooky, set-closing "The Observer," a rapid-flash series of irises, pupils, and vaginas strobed behind the band on the screen while Coyne plucked a sitar-like melody.

The first encore drew from the band's recent tribute album The Flaming Lips and Stardeath and White Dwarfs with Henry Rollins and Peaches Doing The Dark Side of the Moon. They respectfully twisted "Brain Damage" and "Eclipse" into a double-shot of weirdness that Roger Waters would have approved. "Do You Realize??" — the anthemic single from their 2002 album Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots — closed the show on an uplifting note.



F * the Flaming Lips too.


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PostPosted: Thu April 16th, 2015, 17:52 GMT 
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Location: Orlando, FL
Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts/Walt Disney Theater Orlando, FL


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Last edited by judgeholdinggrudge on Thu April 16th, 2015, 18:09 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu April 16th, 2015, 18:08 GMT 
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Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts/Walt Disney Theater outside


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PostPosted: Sun April 19th, 2015, 12:55 GMT 
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Thank you JudgeGrudge! those are really beautiful.
so is the facility. Love the Parisian Colors.

Orlando to Paris to Orlando full circle, full tilt. I like it.

a bit more about Dr. Philips.

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http://www.florida-backroads-travel.com ... 30401.html
Florida Heritage Travel is the companion monthly e-zine of
FLORIDA BACKROADS TRAVEL.

DOCTOR PHILLIPS: CITRUS CAPITAL OF OLD FLORIDA


State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/138624


Doctor Phillips is an unincorporated area about 10 miles southwest of downtown Orlando. The area is named for Doctor Phillip Phillips, a medical doctor with huge holdings in citrus in Orange County. His house in downtown Orlando is still a tourist attraction and a popular bed and breakfast inn. But the sprawling grove area named for him was in the quiet country way back then. You can learn more about the history of Doctor Phillips the man and the place on our website at Doctor Phillips, Florida.

I worked on the construction of Walt Disney World and drove to work many days on Apopka-Vineland Road from 1968 to 1971 when the theme park officially opened. The view in the vintage aerial photo is looking generally northeast along that road. Sand Lake Road can be seen heading off to the east at the top of the photo. My commute took me by one of the remaining Doctor Phillips warehouses on the west side of the road alongside the railroad track. It was being used by Disney in those days to make the vinyl leaves that would be later attached to the Swiss Family Robinson Treehouse in the Magic Kingdom.


There wasn't much of anything else in that neighborhood back then except for orange groves and the Bay Hill Golf and Country Club to the north. Bay Hill was pretty new, having been built in 1961 on land that for some reason wouldn't grow citrus. Other than Bay Hill, the area was still largely in citrus groves. Golfing great Arnold Palmer bought the country club in 1975. The old packing houses were torn down years ago to make room for residential subdivisions. The Doctor Phillips community has expanded in recent years into a small city-sized settlement of about 10,000 people. Take a look at the Google photo below to see what has happened in the years since the vintage aerial above was taken.





In the early days, the railroad connected Doctor Phillips to Vineland 5 miles south, a tiny village on the edge of what is now Lake Buena Vista and all of its hotels and restaurants. Vineland is now a ghost town, all but swallowed up by the massive development that came with the opening of Walt Disney World. All that remains is a little cemetery, closed to the public, and a schoolhouse that was built in 1950. Most of the old roads in Vineland have deteriorated and the land is owned by hotel companies and other developers that will eventually expand onto the land.

The legacy of Vineland lives on in the many roads in the area that carry its name. Among them are Apopka-Vineland Road, Winter Garden-Vineland Road, Ocoee-Vineland Road, Kissimmee-Vineland Road and Taft-Vineland Road. Years ago there was also Orlando-Vineland Road, but now it's known only as Vineland Road and is on the north boundary of Universal Studios. These roads all began or terminated in the former townsite of Vineland.

http://www.florida-backroads-travel.com ... gleMap.jpg

The Swiss Family Robinson Tree and Tom Sawyer's Fort are still the too best places for a good time in Florida, IMO.


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PostPosted: Mon April 20th, 2015, 18:56 GMT 
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Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Broward Center for the Performing Arts
Au-Rene Theater
21 April 2015, Tuesday

My kind of Fort:
http://beritapost.info/au/au-rene-theat ... arts-.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broward_Ce ... rming_Arts

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PostPosted: Thu April 23rd, 2015, 12:33 GMT 
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Oops, I missed you, Clearwater - here's Ruth Eckhard's Hall:
Shining in Florida colors.

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This outstanding venue ranked number 1 in the world in venues having 2,500 seats or less and ninth in the world in venues having 5,000 seats or less in Billboard Magazine’s 2009 year-end issue. Ruth Eckerd Hall has maintained a top ten recognition for venues with 5,000 seats or less for the past decade based on reviews by the industry’s technicians, artists and their management. This outstanding Tampa Bay Destination attracts audiences from around the world.
Ruth Eckerd Hall is the main performing arts center of a multi-venue facility known as the Richard B. Baumgardner Center for the Performing Arts campus. The Baumgardner Center is named in honor of the founder of Kapok Tree Corporation whose generous gift of land made the project possible.


This Christmas, be sure to give the gift of Land.


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PostPosted: Fri April 24th, 2015, 12:56 GMT 
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Pulled over from Arabia's post in the livesetlist threads.

arabia wrote:
Not a mosque but rather the Moorish opulence of Atlanta's Fabulous Fox Theater

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THE FOX STORY

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https://foxtheatre.org/the-fox-story/

The Fox Theatre, world-renowned as a concert and event venue like no other, began its story in a most unusual way.

In 1928, the Fox was originally conceived as a home for Atlanta’s Shriners organization. To create a headquarters befitting the group’s prominent social status, the Shriners looked to the ancient temples of the Far East to inspire a mosque-style structure befitting their stature. Storied architectural gems like the Alhambra in Spain and Egypt’s Temple of Kharnak heavily influenced the building’s elaborate and intensely ornate design. Bursting with soaring domes, minarets and sweeping archways, the exterior of the building gave way to stunning gold leaf details, sumptuous textiles and exquisite trompe l’oeil art (an art technique that uses realistic imagery to create optical illusions) inside.

Ultimately, the design was so fantastical, it became more of a financial burden than the Shriners could bear. Shortly before its completion, the Shriners leased their beautiful auditorium to William Fox, a movie mogul who had launched his empire by building theatres across the country to meet America’s insatiable affection for the new moving pictures that were sweeping the nation. By the end of the 1920s, these aptly-named “movie palaces” were an integral part of nearly every community in the country, each one more gilded and exquisite than the next. Developers like Fox spared no expense, understanding all too well that these movie palaces were the gateway to a brave new world, transporting eager audiences to exotic, elegant settings they could only imagine.

With Fox’s financial backing (the project cost more than $3 million, the equivalent of nearly $40 million today), the 250,000 square foot Fox Theatre was completed, with the crowning addition of “Mighty Mo”, the 3,622-pipe Möller organ that remains the largest Möller theatre organ in the world even today. The Fox opened on Christmas Day in 1929 to a sold-out crowd, premiering Steamboat Willie, Disney’s first cartoon starring Mickey Mouse.

Word about the magnificent new Fox Theatre quickly spread. Its striking red-carpet entryway and ornate gilt work, soaring turreted ceilings and stained glass windows, all leading to a vast cobalt “sky” with a sea of twinkling stars, were the perfect accent for the glamorous productions audiences lined up to see. Despite its popularity, the Fox’s grandeur couldn’t save it from the far-reaching effects of the Great Depression. In 1932, William Fox and the theatre were forced to declare bankruptcy, and Fox lost his namesake movie palace. The Fox was auctioned on courthouse steps and sold to a private company for a paltry $75,000 during Mr. Fox’s bankruptcy proceedings, but remained a beloved destination for Atlanta’s moviegoers. For the next three decades, the Fox remained in high demand, showing hundreds of acclaimed films, hosting live performances ranging from the Metropolitan Opera Company to pop legends like Nelson Eddy, and reigning as the favorite dance hall in Atlanta as the craze for live Big Band and Swing music swept the nation.

But the rocky fate of the Fox was still in flux. By the late 1960s, beautiful landmark movie palaces like the Fox were falling out of favor, replaced by suburban movieplexes built for efficiency and multiple-screen showings. As customers began migrating to the suburbs, the Fox fell into disrepair, and in 1974, Mosque Inc. closed the Fox’s doors, seemingly forever. This stunning landmark, beloved for generations, was suddenly facing demolition. Confronted with the possibility of losing their beloved landmark, the residents of Atlanta sprang into action. They created a non-profit called Atlanta Landmarks and launched the now-legendary “Save The Fox” campaign, which raised funds through every possible means – collecting donations from both public and private organizations, organizing benefit concerts featuring everyone from Lynyrd Skynyrd to Liberace, even collecting pennies at local businesses, all to save the Fox from what seemed a certain fate.

Saving the Fox truly was a community achievement, a journey of a thousand small steps. Of the $3 million raised, no single donation was over $400,000; the vast majority of the fund was made up of small personal donations from Atlanta residents intent on rescuing this stunning structure. In 1975, after months of painstaking restoration efforts, the Fox opened its doors once again, to the joy and celebration of the patrons and employees who had pulled it from the brink of disaster.

Atlanta Landmarks (now called Fox Theatre, Inc.) continues to run the theatre today, making it one of an elite group of not-for-profit theatres in the country, committed to making performance art accessible to everyone. Continuing their efforts to give back to the community they love, in 2008, the Fox launched the Fox Theatre Institute (FTI), a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and restoration of historic theatres. The FTI provides essential technical, historical and organizational support and education to theatres across the country. The successful program recently spawned Georgia Presenters, a booking consortium project that helps small communities band together to attract high-grade talent and performance art in their area for an affordable price.

Since the “Save The Fox” campaign, the Fox has become a destination for audiences, historians and tourists alike, all of whom flock to the renowned theatre to see its grandeur firsthand. Now primarily a venue for a huge variety of headlining events, the “Fabulous Fox” (as it is affectionately known) has truly become a legend in its own right, showcasing unforgettable performances by everyone from Elvis Presley to Madonna, and playing host to countless Broadway shows, including the world premiere of The Phantom of the Opera’s touring production. In addition, the theatre’s lavish ballrooms, lounges and outdoor terraces are perpetually in high demand for fashionable weddings and special events taking place in Atlanta.

Each year, the award-winning theatre hosts more than 250 shows and half a million visitors for its legendary offerings. In the past decade, the Fox has been widely recognized by leading industry influencers for excellence in arts and entertainment, preservation and arts education. It was nominated for Theatre of the Year by Billboard and Pollstar Magazines, and awarded the Outstanding Historic Theatre of the Year award in 2011 by the League of Historic American Theatres. The Fabulous Fox was most recently given the distinction by Rolling Stone Magazine as one of “The Best Big Rooms in America”. For the past decade, The Fox Theatre has been consistently ranked in the top three theatres in North America for gross ticket sales, making it clear that this time, the Fox is here to stay.

For visitors curious about the colorful history of the unforgettable Fox, or just itching for a close-up look at the beautiful building, the Fox is pleased to offer tours of the theatre. These 60-minute tours are guided by dedicated Fox employees who relish the opportunity to provide intimate firsthand details about the theatre’s remarkable story, and give guests an unprecedented look at Atlanta’s favorite theatre.

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Seems like a hurricane-esque eye on the ceiling that could swallow up Dylan's Eye if it needed too.


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PostPosted: Sat April 25th, 2015, 14:51 GMT 
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Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC)


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The Durham Performing Arts Center opened November 30, 2008 as the largest performing arts center in the Carolinas at a cost of $48 million.[1] DPAC hosts over 200 performances a year including touring Broadway productions, high-profile concert and comedy events, family shows and the American Dance Festival. Operated under the direction of Nederlander and Professional Facilities Managaement (PFM), DPAC has twice been listed as the #1 performing arts organization in the Triangle region by the Triangle Business Journal. Construction of the DPAC was part of a larger plan to redevelop downtown Durham by the Capitol Broadcasting Company, and includes other nearby properties such as the American Tobacco Historic District, the Durham Bulls Athletic Park, and the studios of the CBC-owned Fox 50 TV station.

Listed three times in the top 50 in Pollstar magazine's worldwide theater attendance ranking, in 2011 DPAC was the #1 U.S. Theater in the listing with a capacity under 4,000 and #4 ranked Theater among all U.S. Theaters.


The theater was developed by the American Center for the Performing Arts Associates, a joint venture between Philip Szostak Associates and Garfield Traub Development of Dallas, Texas. The architect was Szostak Design Inc. of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The theater holds 2,712.[1] The first event on opening night was a concert given by B.B. King.[1] The theater is owned by the city of Durham.[2] After talks with ClearChannel fell through,[3] the City negotiated a theater operating agreement with Nederlander Organization and Professional Facilities Management. The operator guarantees a minimum of 100 event performances per year on a rolling three-year average and absorbs any losses for the first five years of operation, at which time the operator could return the management back to the City or negotiate the terms of continued third party management of the theater with the City.

The City borrowed $33.7 million for the center's construction through Certificates of Participation ("COPs"), instruments commonly used to finance municipal facilities. Debt service payments on COPs are subject annual appropriation the City, and as such are considered an annual operating expense rather than a long-term capital obligation. Accordingly, a voter referendum was not required for the issuance of the COPs.[2] Additional sources of funds for the project include facility naming rights, a Duke University contribution, an operator loan, and several other sources. The Duke University contribution equaled $7.5 million.[4] The theater hosts, on favorable rental terms, the seven-week American Dance Festival summer series, which had previously been presented in the 1,232-seat Page Auditorium at Duke University[5] The cost to the city for the $33.7 million in bonds will be almost $70 million over 28 years.[2]

Naming rights were budgeted to bring in $800,000 annually, but in 2007 when the project was $400,000 under that estimate, the city agreed to draw up to $200,000 a year from its general fund to partially make up the difference.[2] The Durham city council agreed to an additional $200,000 request in April 2009 for video and trash facility installation.[3] While the City has had some success with naming rights, securing major naming rights sponsorships has been challenging due to current economic conditions.

However, the theater has far exceeded projections for attendance, activity, gross revenue, net income after operating expenses. Both the City's 40% share of theater net income and income to the City from ticket facility fee surcharges have far exceeded projections. At more than $1.2 million, the City's 40% share of theater net income in fiscal year 2009-2010 was over five times more than originally projected.


Spectators Entering Durham Performing Arts Center
Further, the theater has had far greater fiscal and economic impacts than the $7 million to $11 million original annual projections of the City's independent consultant and the Durham Convention and Visitor's Bureau ("DCVB"). The DCVB estimates that the theater had a $10.9 million economic impact to the City in just the first seven months of operation. In the 2009-2010 fiscal year, the City of Durham reported that the theater had a citywide economic impact of over $24 million.

The Durham Performing Arts Center has been credited with benefiting the restaurant business in downtown Durham, in spite of the 2008 - 2010 recession. Five downtown restaurants opened in downtown Durham in proximity to the theater since its opening, significantly supported by pre- and post-show seatings generated by the theater. The theater was cited in a CNN Money and Fortune Magazine article ranking the City of Durham as number one in its list of "25 Best Places to Retire."

In spite of the sharpest decline in the travel and leisure sector in a generation due to the recent recession, the State of North Carolina ranked as the third highest state in hospitality job growth according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Durham Performing Arts Center was cited as contributing "to the growth of leisure and hospitality jobs in North Carolina over the past five years" by the Triangle Business Journal.

In 2004, the chairman of the board of what was to be DPAC's primary local booking, the American Dance Festival, said that the goals of DPAC and the goals of the festival were at odds.[3] Although the supporters of DPAC's construction mentioned the dance festival as a primary reason for building the theatre, the festival's request for a small black box theatre was not granted.[3] However, in 2009, the festival said that the larger theatre had solved many complaints about the festival's previous space at Duke University.[3]

Controversies[edit]
Concerns have consistently been raised by Triangle arts supporters[5] that the Durham theatre could hurt the nearby Carolina Theatre (also owned by the city of Durham) or the Progress Energy Center for the Performing Arts in Raleigh.[2]

However, contrary to these concerns, the DPAC has actually benefited the Carolina Theatre through co-promotion opportunities and other policies and activities. On July 16, 2012, less than three years after the grand opening of DPAC, it was announced that the Carolina Theatre was ranked among the top 100 theaters in the world in attendance for the first time in its history.[6]

Former Durham City Council member Thomas Stith objected when city employee Mark Greenspan lobbied the city council on behalf of the theatre's eventual contractor, Skanska, and then went to work for Skanska four months after the contract was awarded.[2] Stith called for a "cooling-off period" for city employees, similar to those enacted by state and federal governments.[2] The Durham City Council rejected the measure in April 2007.[2]



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PostPosted: Sun April 26th, 2015, 00:26 GMT 
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A Merry Llama wrote:

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In 1988, the Minneapolis Community Development Agency purchased the Orpheum from singer Bob Dylan and his brother, *David Zimmerman, who owned the theatre. .[/i]

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*Has he ever been a musician as his work too? I read on one of the threads that he also plays piano.


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PostPosted: Sun April 26th, 2015, 14:03 GMT 
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The beautiful Peace Center, Greenville, South Carolina.

I imagine it would benefit the world if all music venues were called Peace Centers.
Better to raise such consciousnesses than building another Bank of America Pavilion.

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note the lack of center aisle space/division. make peace with your seat neighbors.
one sad note in these beautiful venues, is that it seems the sitters are out-positioning the standers,
as they are outnumbered 7-1

http://www.peacecenter.org/about-us/mission-history

Back in the mid 1980s, as part of a focused effort to revitalize downtown Greenville, a unique public-private partnership was formed to create a performing arts center. Springing from an initial $10 Million pledge by members of the Peace family, the campaign to build the Peace Center for the Performing Arts began.

The vision—building a cultural and architectural gem at the heart of the city as a focal point for revitalization—captivated the entire community. With donations from leading families and individuals, corporations…even school children, the initial effort quickly raised the $42 Million needed to bring the idea to life.

The initial design and site selection were strategic in the overall development of the cultural landscape of downtown Greenville. On the site—six acres at the corner of Main and Broad Streets—stood four deteriorating nineteenth century structures. A coach factory, a textile plant, a mayonnaise factory, and a turn-of-the-century retail store. Conscious of the connection of these buildings to the community’s heritage, the development team decided to restore the buildings and incorporate them into the master plan, which featured the newly-constructed Peace Concert Hall and Gunter Theatre.

In November of 1990, the community celebrated the completion of construction with a weekend Gala. And the inaugural season took the stage.

To ensure the long-term financial health of the Peace Center, a $6.5-million endowment campaign was launched in 1992. The goal was met in less than two years, establishing a firm financial foundation for generations to come.

In the ensuing years, the Peace Center continued to grow and evolve, with program innovations, facilities improvements, and numerous successful annual campaigns.

In 2010, twenty years after the original ground breaking, the Peace Center raised the bar again with plans for a $23 million renovation. The renovation included expanding the concert hall lobby, adding Genevieve’s, a magnificent new restaurant and patron lounge, and reconceiving exterior spaces including the TD Stage amphitheatre and Graham Plaza. Also, extensive renovations to the Huguenot Mill included updating the Peace Center administrative offices, adding Ramsaur Studio (a brand new education facility), and building a unique meeting and event space, the Certus Loft.

The Peace Center Today

More than 360,000 people a year, from around the region and across the country, come to the Peace Center for some 600 events. Shows include some of the best of Broadway and dance, the world’s finest musicians and funniest comedians, and Greenville’s premier performing arts groups—the Carolina Ballet Theatre, Greenville Chorale, Greenville County Youth Orchestras, Greenville Symphony Orchestra, International Ballet, and South Carolina Children’s Theater. With its regional draw, the Peace Center generates economic activity exceeding $25 million a year.

More than a place for performances, the Peace Center enriches our community, engaging students, teachers, parents and others throughout the community through the education initiatives of the Peace Outreach Program. Every year, this nationally-recognized program brings literature, history, science, and the arts to life for nearly 55,000 attendees.

Through the Peace Voices program, students learn to express their views and feelings through the art of poetry, working with acclaimed poet, Glenis Redmond. Master classes, lectures, workshops, and specially developed performances give kids a whole new way to learn and help teachers grow in their profession.

In the past several years, the Peace Center campus has evolved along with its South Main Street neighborhood. In 2012, The Gullick Building was purchased in order to round out the Peace Center’s street presence. The newly developed Graham Plaza, with its plant scapes, water features, and granite walkways and stairways, provides a sense of arrival. The Plaza also serves as an architectural hub, pulling together the various campus venues, and as a gather place for informal, outdoor events.

With it’s mixture of the old and the new, it’s variety of performance and event spaces—the Peace Concert Hall, Gunter Theatre, TD Stage, Graham Plaza, Genevieve’s (just off the Peace Concert Hall lobby), Ramsaur Studio, Certus Loft—the Peace Center continues to create a space for cultural activity and energy for Greenville’s downtown and economic development.

The Peace Center vision is to evolve, as the city itself and the nature of performing arts change. With additions such as the comfort and light of the new lobby, the face of the campus has changed since the 1990 opening. But the heart remains the same—to be the cultural center of a vibrant and exciting region.


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PostPosted: Mon April 27th, 2015, 03:40 GMT 
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Peace brings change!


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PostPosted: Mon April 27th, 2015, 04:14 GMT 
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All we are saying is
give Bob a chance


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PostPosted: Mon April 27th, 2015, 04:17 GMT 
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Setism


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PostPosted: Mon April 27th, 2015, 12:05 GMT 
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Nashville is Waiting for You:

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The Tennessee Performing Arts Center, or TPAC, is located in the James K. Polk Cultural Center at 505 Deaderick Street in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, occupying an entire city block between 5th and 6th Avenues North and Deaderick and Union Streets. Also housing the Tennessee State Museum, the cultural center adjoins the 18 story James K. Polk State Office Building.

The idea for a large-scale performing arts facility developed in 1972 when Martha Rivers Ingram was appointed to the advisory board of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC. She proposed a similar center for her home city of Nashville. Ingram's proposal involved a public-private partnership that would operate within a state-owned facility. Her idea met with considerable resistance, but she persevered—for eight years and during the terms of three governors. The result was the Tennessee Performing Arts Center, or TPAC, a three-theater facility located beneath a state office building across the street from the Tennessee State Capitol. [1] In 1980, TPAC opened as the state's premier theater venue.

Among its many operations, TPAC presents a series of touring Broadway shows and special engagements, and administers a comprehensive education program. Martha Rivers Ingram and her supporters also raised an endowment to defray operating losses and to fund a program that grooms future audiences for TPAC performances. The endowment goal was $3.5 million, and they surpassed it, raising $5 million. Today, the endowment has grown to $20 million. Each year, more than 100,000 students, from kindergarten through 12th grade, are brought to Nashville for performances by Nashville Ballet, the Nashville Opera, and the Tennessee Repertory Theatre, which are all resident performing arts groups of TPAC and provide year-round programming. Other companies also use TPAC's facilities for plays, dance performances, concerts and other cultural programs.

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Good thing Bob's not a dinosaur act.

Quote:
Anyone who has seen a show in TPAC’s Andrew Jackson Hall knows that you can see the stage from all angles, but it can be easy to forget just how big the stage needs to be for there not to be a bad seat in the house.

The actual dimensions of the Jackson stage are 130’10’’ wide by 53’1’’ deep. To give a better idea of what is might take to cover the stage, here are a few examples to keep things in perspective:

•About 110,876 tennis balls would be needed to cover the stage.
•Roughly 140 Smart Cars could park on the stage.
•About three school buses end to end would cover just the length of the stage.
• And one Argentinosaurus could stand on the stage.

Next time you sit in the audience, remember that in Andrew Jackson Hall the stage itself is a testament to how those larger-than-life productions come together.


http://www.tpac.org/spotlight/one-argentinosaurus/

(includes a flash zoom of stageview)


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PostPosted: Wed April 29th, 2015, 15:30 GMT 
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Thanks to Queen Ann Lace for posting these in the livesetlistthread

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"The South's Grandest Theatre"

Designed by Emile Weil, the Saenger Theatre was built by Julian Saenger in 1927 for the theretofore unheard of price of $2.5 million dollars. Advertisements of the day described it as “an acre of seats in a garden of Florentine splendor”. Today, the interior atmospheric design creates a magnificent 15th century Italian courtyard and gardens, with arched surroundings, columns and decorative moldings. The suspension of disbelief is completed by a blue domed “sky” ceiling complete with twinkling stars. Greek and Roman statuary line the walls and statues of Venus stand on pedestals along the upper rim of the auditorium.


In 2005, the Saenger Theatre was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. Yet within months of the storm, a groundswell of interest in the renovation and reopening of the theatre began to grow, and, in December 2011; the agreements to restore the theatre were finalized.

The $53 million project serves to anchor the revitalization of Canal Street and the New Orleans Central Business District and act as an economic generator attracting visitors from New Orleans and the Gulf South region to enjoy the very finest live entertainment available.


The Saenger Theatre reopened its doors in September 2013.

The Saenger Theatre restoration was a National Rehabilitation Tax Credit project, whose scope of construction served to authentically restore this historic 1927 movie palace, and transform it into a first class state-of-the-art performing arts theatre.

The restored Saenger Theatre features beautifully restored lobbies and auditorium seating area with carpeting and lighting fixtures recreated from the originals. Expanded restrooms and concessions facilities ensure the greatest comfort for our patrons.

The expanded theatre stage house will be equipped with state-of-the-art theatrical systems ensuring the Saenger will be the most technically advanced theatre in the South.

more:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saenger_Th ... _Louisiana)


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PostPosted: Tue May 5th, 2015, 14:01 GMT 
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The Grand Opera House originally stood where The Orpheum is located today. “The Grand,” as it was called, was built in 1890. During the last decade of the 19th century and until 1923 the “bill of fare” was Vaudeville and silent movies. During the peak years of Vaudeville, The Grand Opera House hosted such luminaries as John Philip Sousa, Madame Sarah Bernhardt, Harry Houdini, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Eddie Cantor and Helen Keller. In 1907 The Grand’s name changed to The Orpheum as it became part of The Orpheum Circuit.

In 1923, The Orpheum burned to the ground.

In 1928, the current building was constructed and continued to operate as a movie palace rather than Vaudeville, since Vaudeville was fading as an entertainment option.

In 1940, M.A. Lightman bought the theatre to become the flagship of the Malco movie theatre chain, which is still a forceful corporation today. 1975 saw the end of the “Movie Palace” era as the theatre closed again.
In 1976, The Memphis Development Foundation was incorporated to purchase and ”save” the old movie palace and to serve as a cornerstone to other development projects in the downtown area. Broadway touring production and local ballet and opera companies became the impetus of the new Orpheum Theatre’s undergoing another change in entertainment offerings.

In 1983, The Orpheum was closed for one year, and a $6 million renovation took place. Thirteen years later, in 1996, it became apparent that the stage and backstage space would not accommodate the new big shows going on tour, such as The Phantom of the Opera, Miss Saigon, and Sunset Boulevard. The decision was made to close the theatre again, knock out the back wall, expand the stage, and rebuild all of the back-of-house areas to suit the larger casts, sets, and new technical requirements. The cost of this major undertaking was almost $10 million. The Orpheum as we see it today has become what it was always intended to be: a quality facility offering quality productions and serving as an anchor for the surrounding area.


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PostPosted: Tue May 5th, 2015, 14:10 GMT 
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It's a small world (in a small town) after all:

The exterior of the Winstar World Casino is a walking tour of architectural history and style. Designed by the creative team at Stromberg, the building's exterior façade begins in London, England and finishes in the far reaches of Asia. There are 11 different sections along the casino's perimeter; each representing a unique contribution to the architectural world. Beginning on the north side of Winstar and moving south, the sections contained include the following:

Big Ben

Big Ben is the nickname for the Palace of Westminster's bell tower. One of London's most famous tourist attractions, it has the largest four-faced chiming clock and is the third tallest free-standing clock tower in the world. With the Westminster Palace, it is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The original 1800s drawings and gothic details by architects Pugin and Barry were used by Stromberg for the Winstar reproduction. The Winstar Big Ben is the largest tower clock in Oklahoma and was erected in 2009 to commemorate the 150th birthday of London's original.

Palace of Westminster

The original Palace of Westminster lies on the north bank of the Thames River in London. The palace began in the Middle Ages but was rebuilt and remodeled frequently due to many devastating fires. The current version, built in the 1800s, took over 30 years to complete. The elegant turrets were actually chimneys, and the statues represent heroes from British history. The Winstar version of the Palace of Westminster was built in 2009. The panels, statues and gothic details were sculpted and cast by Stromberg based on design drawings from the original.

The Rise of Castles in Europe

Castles, perhaps the most romanticized structures ever built, arrived in Europe in the 10th century and were the next step in development from the hill forts of the bronze and iron ages. Castles exploded across the English countryside following the victory of William the Conqueror in the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and at one time there were more than 10,000 of them dotting the landscape across Spain. Stromberg designed the Castle wall at Winstar with inspiration from the concentric castle design which began to emerge in the late 13th century.

Puerta de Alcal�

Puerta de Alcal� is the centerpiece in Madrid's Plaza de Indepencia. It was originally built to mark the beginning of a path from the capital city to the historic nearby city of Alcal� de Henares. The monument was commissioned by King Carlos III and designed by Italian architect Francesco Sabatini. The gateway is built in the style of a Roman triumphal arch. The original monument was completed in 1778, then moved to its current location in the city's center in the 19th century. Stromberg installed Winstar's version of the Puerta de Alcal� in 2009.

The Roman Colosseum

The Colosseum in Rome is one of the greatest architectural marvels of history. It was commissioned by Emperor Vespasian in 72 A.D. and completed by his son Titus in 80 A.D. The work required to build such a structure necessitated the use of upwards of 30,000 laborers. The original venue was most famously the home of gladiator contests, but was also the home to mock naval battles, hunts, reenactments of historical conflicts and dramatic performances. As an entertainment venue, it stayed in use for nearly 500 years.

Doge's Palace

Doge's Palace is one of the most recognizable landmarks in Venice, Italy. Built for the republic's elected ruler, the palace was renovated and reconstructed many times from the 9th century until the current building was finished in 1420. The present incarnation was largely the work of architect and sculptor Filippo Calendario. In addition to being the Doge's residence, it was also the location of courts of law, the Sala del Maggior Consiglio (Hall of the Great Council), offices of bureaucracy and at one time even the city's jail.

The Pantheon

Almost 2,000 years after its construction (126 A.D.) the Pantheon in Rome remains the world's largest unreinforced dome, therefore one of the great marvels of architectural accomplishment. Within the Pantheon are the tombs of artists, composers, architects and even two kings. It was given to Pope Boniface IV in 609 A.D. at which time it became a church, and mass is still celebrated there to this day. Stromberg of Greenville, TX recreated the portico of the Pantheon in recognition of its unending impact on the world of architecture, serving as the inspiration for scores of monumental buildings, including the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

The Triumphal Arch

The Triumphal Arch is a globally recognized architectural statement that traces its origins back to Rome, though no one knows exactly when the first one was built. These arches were often built to commemorate a great victory in battle or in honor of a specific ruler. The first reference to them in literature dates all the way back to the first century. In the centuries since, triumphal arches have been built worldwide. Today, massive Triumphal Arches are available to be visited in more than 35 different countries. Now there is one more, created by Stromberg of Greenville, which stands at Winstar Casino in Oklahoma.

Palazzo Vecchio

Florence's town hall, a Romanesque fortress-palace, overlooks the Piazza della Signoria and is one of the most celebrated public places in Italy. It was originally called the Palazzo della Signoria, after the Republic of Florence's ruling priori. It was built at the turn of the 13th and 14th centuries, though further additions to the building in the 15th and 16th centuries significantly increased its architectural scale. Within the Palazzo is the Salone dei Cinquecento, a massive assembly hall for the General Council of the People. Stromberg of Greenville, TX recreated this Italian masterpiece for Winstar World Casino.

The streetscapes of Europe

Quaint and charming, the simplicity of Europe's city streets makes them architectural artworks in and of themselves. Many a traveler has indulged in the fluctuating frontages that create a distinguishing look to the common, more residential quarters of Europe's cities both large and small. The patchwork of different constructions, built or replaced at different times over centuries, blend together to create a singular composition of timeless, yet humble elegance. Stromberg Architectural Products drew the inspiration for this section of the Winstar World Casino from the smaller residential avenues found across the European continent.

Foundations of the Far East

The Asian façade at Winstar draws its inspiration from traditional Chinese and Japanese hallmarks of architectural accomplishment, reproduced by Stromberg. The Great Wall of China, completed during the Ming dynasty, is visible as the centerpiece of this section of Winstar. Also present are a gate and fortified walls from the design of medieval Samurai Castles. The cornerstone of the Asian façade at Winstar is the Pagoda, which originally came from India and meshed with Chinese design to create one of the most recognizable icons of architecture worldwide.
The Interior of Winstar

While the exterior façade of Winstar World Casino is, without a doubt, a monumental accomplishment; Stromberg's work was not done. From there, Stromberg's team moved to the interior of the project to help establish the casino as a truly world class facility, both inside and out.
New York

You enter the Winstar World Casino through New York's Grand Central Terminal, faithfully recreated by the Stromberg design team. Immediately you will set your eyes on Lady Liberty as she watches over the entertainment floor. The Brooklyn Bridge compliments the skyline of the Big Apple. The elements that make up the streetscapes are presented to the Winstar visitor, complete with fire, police and post office facilities inspired by the actual buildings in the big city. There's even a chance to wander by Central Park. And what trip to New York would be complete without an excursion to the city's famous subway system? It's all there, courtesy of Stromberg Architectural Products.
Egypt

From New York, you can wander through the streets of a bustling bazaar directly into the heart of Egypt. Two powerful Sphinxes stand guard in the area, and from the moment you pass through the ancient Egyptian gate, hieroglyphics speak tales of the distant past in a land far away. Horus, Anubis, Isis, Osiris; all of the familiar characters of Egyptian lore are present. In the canopy over the Black Jack tables, the walls and the columns throughout; you will find the intricate recreations of artwork that is the hallmark of Egypt's past culture and Stromberg's current commitment to excellence in design and production. In need of some cash at this point? Look for the Obelisks which house the ATM stations conveniently located in this section.
Vienna

Otto Wagner achieved worldwide recognition when he built Karlsplatz Plaza in what was one of the most modern cities of the time. At Winstar World Casino, we celebrated that spirit with the creation the Vienna section of the casino's interior. Wagner's Jugendstil architecture is apparent in the high limits pavilion and adjacent Black Jack gaming area. In the 1980s the original Karlsplatz Plaza was scheduled for demolition before a public outcry saved the buildings for posterity's sake. Stromberg took this architectural acknowledgement one step further by recreating Karlsplatz within the walls of the Winstar World Casino in Thackerville, Oklahoma.


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PostPosted: Tue May 5th, 2015, 14:19 GMT 
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In downtown Oklahoma City, the WPA constructed a building first known as the Municipal Auditorium <in 1937>. With a blend of neoclassical and Art Deco architecture, it became the city’s primary performing arts venue. Later renamed Civic Center Music Hall, it became the cornerstone of the city’s landmark MAPS program in 1999 with extensive renovations and a new public/private partnership between the city and the Civic Center Foundation. Now, the stately hall has stood for three-quarters of a century as testament to what America and Oklahoma can do.


“Before the erection of this auditorium, Oklahoma City had no place which could seat more than 2,000 people where public meetings could be held."


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PostPosted: Tue May 5th, 2015, 14:27 GMT 
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Bayou Place is a 130,000 square foot[1] entertainment complex that houses multiple theaters, bars, and restaurants located in Downtown Houston, Texas, United States. The complex was the former Albert Thomas convention center located in the Houston Theater District at 500 Texas Street (originally built in the late 1960s).

The convention center was made obsolete with the opening in 1987 of the much larger George R. Brown Convention Center on the eastern edge of downtown. After years of discussion (which included possibly turning the building into offices, or demolishing it altogether), Maryland-based developer David Cordish entered into an agreement with the city of Houston in 1991 to redevelop the site. After a few more years of discussions, delays, and construction, it was reopened to the public as an entertainment complex December 31 (New Year's Eve), 1997.[2] At one time the complex had a scheduled completion date in the year 1996.[3]


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Room for me and room for you
fifty miles of elbow room.
(in Houston)


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PostPosted: Wed May 6th, 2015, 18:05 GMT 
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Bass Concert Hall, Austin Texas

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The University of Texas Performing Arts Center (PAC) is a collective of six theatres operated by The University of Texas at Austin, College of Fine Arts. The theaters are the Bass Concert Hall, McCullough Theater, Bates Recital Hall, Hogg Memorial Auditorium, B. Iden Payne Theater and Oscar Brockett Theater. Theaters range in size from the Oscar G. Brockett Theatre, which has 200 seats, to the Bass Concert Hall, which seats 3,000. In addition to the theaters, the PAC also has offices and meeting rooms, rehearsal spaces and shops which are located in the central PAC building and across the campus. PAC provides students an opportunity to interact with professionals in staging events and performing arts and extends an opportunity to the surrounding community to participate in all-age programs.


The Center was first opened in 1981. Between 1982 and January, 2008, the Center was directed by Pebbles Wadsworth, who was declared an Honorary Texan in 1987 for her contributions through PAC.[1] Under Wadsworth's supervision, in 2002 PAC launched its multicultural ArtesAméricas program in conjunction with the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies.[2] Wadsworth conceived of the program in response to a 1998 request by former University of Texas president Larry Faulkner to "strengthen ties between the United States and Latin America."[2] Among other activities, the program facilitates performances by Latin American artists across the United States, at the PAC and at the 52 institutions that partner it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University ... rts_Center


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