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PostPosted: Fri September 3rd, 2010, 21:38 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
The Great Wandu wrote:
Hey Victor--I have to pull out the "Flowers" episode from some large stack of CD's to answer your question from awhile back, but as for the opening music in "The Bible" episode: Miles Davis, "It Ain't Necessarily So" from Porgy and Bess.


Thanks again Wandu! You seem to be really great jazz expert! I love Miles Davis too, but basically only listening to a couple of his records over and over - they're like inexhaustible for me, you know?)
I'd really appreciate if you'll go through your stack of CD's for "Flower"'s song - no rush for this, just when't you'll get a spare time.



Fred and Karl, if you can help with the rest of my questions, I'm still waiting;)


By the way, making these translations of TTRH and putting them online... - more ppl here in Ukraine are thinking that this is my own show, and that it's a real radio-show - not just a podcast. One Ukrainian-Canadian emigrant DJ even suggested me to contact Canadian or US' producers and broadcast the show out there for Ukr emigrants:)) Well it's flattering. Too bad that Sirius/XM don't have some Ukrainian channel:) Anyways, I'm saying all this cause it seems like we're doing a professional job here - and I'm grateful you're helping me with it. Unfortunately, there's no money in it - if there were, I'd share with you and XM and Mr. Dylan:)


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PostPosted: Sat September 4th, 2010, 03:23 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
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Location: Ukraine
Heh, it's only now I realized - question about this episode's intro song was answered not so long ago on these forums, and I even posted something in that thread).. well, sorry.. it's just - usually I don't do a lot of research while transcribing, I start when I'm translating...

Still, the music behind "Samson and Delilah" story is so familiar - I even thought it was something form Beethoven...


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PostPosted: Sat September 4th, 2010, 10:06 GMT 
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Location: Oslo, Norway
So many things you hear every day...
“Seek and you shall find,” ...
" Reap what you sowed,"...
“The love of money is the root of all kinds of evil.”
... where cats are mow 'n' hathe with a rubber hose ???


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PostPosted: Sat September 4th, 2010, 19:30 GMT 
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where cats are mow 'n' hathe with a rubber hose ???

lol
I'm enjoying this thread
just listened to streets yesterday


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PostPosted: Sun September 5th, 2010, 06:21 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
ocgypsy wrote:
where cats are mow 'n' hathe with a rubber hose ???

lol
I'm enjoying this thread
just listened to streets yesterday


Well you better help if you enjoy it so much)



Thanks very much, Karl, as always!


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PostPosted: Mon September 6th, 2010, 15:53 GMT 
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Joined: Sat February 17th, 2007, 00:50 GMT
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Location: Southern California
I often don't know which theme time you're referring to and
the stabs in the dark are hilarious but give me little clue.
I thought I knew them pretty well but they are slip sliding away --


"the people" who are helping you deserve some kind of reward,
they really are doing a great job.

My best friends mom was Ukrainian & at Easter her eggs blew
everybody else's out of the water.


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PostPosted: Thu September 9th, 2010, 21:04 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 28th, 2008, 19:54 GMT
Posts: 140
Victor--finally got around to it. The song that starts the "Flowers" episode is "Passion Flower" which Billy Strayhorn wrote and Duke Ellington recorded numerous times--as well as 100 other guys. Not sure which version this is (I'm not a jazz expert by any means), but I'd wager it's likely one of Duke's with Johnny Hodges playing sax--Duke recorded it many times and in different ways (like with a vocal by Ella). Great song, it really sets a late nite mood.


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 04:41 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
@ocgypsy Of course, they deserve all kinds of rewards.
Hehe, yeah, Ukrainians are good at preparing Easter eggs)... Though, guys like Eddie G. are obviously good at hiding Easter eggs).


@Wandu, thanks a lot once more!! That's really magnificent song - no wonder there's so many versions of it.



Meanwhile - I'm ready to put put out "Musical Map." As always, not without help requests.

1. Again rather familiar song in the very beginning of the episode - while Ellen Barkin intro.

2. Rather not familiar song in the background while Mr. Dylan's outro - in the very end, right before "Top Cat"...

3.... And right after story of vandalized statue of Bob Wills - which was told over some sort of a march song - I don't know, but why if there's a chance someone know what that 'march' exactly is.

4. Right before The Louvin Brothers' devastating song - finishing with an email - there is some unknown song as well - possibly Herbie Hancock's sample from some gangsta rap song. It's not very important question, but in case someoneknows the name of the song - why not share it?)

Ok, now traditional questons:

1. Right in the intro Mr. Dylan says: "And today, take your map out of the glove compartment, ‘cause we’re going from East to West, North to South, travel the highways and the (???)ways of the great forty-eight and may even stop of in the fiftieth state."

2. Right after hank Snow's song: .” Hank was playing at the Grand Ole Opry, in 19 and 54, and persuaded everyone along with(?) new singer by the name of Elvis Presley to appear on the stage

3. While presenting a song by Sol. K. Bright's Hollywayiians: Here’s that Hawaiian cowboy, and he’s find a horse who’s ride as smooth like a (moonfish), and who’s crouch, forget about...

4. While presenting Tom Wait's song: Here’s (the keep take-up a song?). Another favorite, on Theme Time Radio Hour, the love song,...

5. While presenting ZZ Top's song: This Dusty Hill on base guitar, Frank Beard playing the drums, and Billy Gibbons (???safety)[/u] in Mississippi.

And this question I hope Fred particularly could help me with:
Right before Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood gonna sing about Jackson, Mr. Dylan gives the list of famous Jackson's people: Otis Span comes from there, so does Papa Charlie McCoy, Leanne Rimes, Eudora Welty, Cassandra Wilson, professional football player Walter Payton, [u]and unit of measure
, Fred Smoot. - I understand, it was another "Smoot" after whom unit of measure was named, Fred Smoot appears to a football player. Is there some joke I'm not getting, research team screwed up, or I mixed everything?



20 Musical Map



[unknown music playing in the back ground]

The Lady in Red (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. A cab driver curses under his breath. Roasted chickens hang in the window of a Chinese restaurant.

The Lady in Red: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Welcome once again to Theme Time Radio Hour. And today, take your map out of the glove compartment, ‘cause we’re going from East to West, North to South, travel the highways and the (???)ways of the great forty-eight and may even stop of in the fiftieth state. Because this week we’re gonna present you [unknown music stops playing in the back ground] – the listener – with a musical map.

Bob Dylan: Let’s start things off with the singing ranger – Hank Snow, and like Little Jimmy Dickens, he little but he’s loud. He’s been everywhere ‘cross the desert bare, and he’s proud to tell us all about it. You’ll hear about Reno and Chicago and Fargo, and Buffalo. Winslow and Wichita, among many other cities. Tulsa and Ottawa too. This is one o f those songs that starts off with a prelude; so don't be concerned, the body of the song will start in just a moment.

[Hank Snow – “I've Been Everywhere”]

Bob Dylan: That was Hank Snow with one of his signature songs, “I’ve Been Everywhere.” Hank was playing at the Grand Ole Opry, in 19 and 54, and persuaded everyone along with(?) new singer by the name of Elvis Presley to appear on the stage. He used Elvis as his opening act and introduced him to Colonel Tom Parker – a man who would put live chickens on a hot plate and tell people there were dancing. True to form, the Colonel squeezed Hank out of the manager position and tool over Elvis’ career himself. Fortunately Hank had a lot of talent, he did fine as a performer himself. He didn’t meant to be Elvis Presley’s manger. Colonel Tom Parker – a man as hard as his arteries or, as Cleopatra would have said, ‘I'd like two sons by that man.’

Bob Dylan: Sometimes when you’re in the basement, looking at a box of records to buy, you come across a name on a label and you just have to own it. That's the way I felt when I first saw this one – Professor Longhair and the Shuffling Hungarians – on Star Talent Records. One of the best records that ever came out of New Orleans. Henry Roeland Byrd, better known as Professor Longhair, grew up on the streets of New Orleans, he tap danced on the Bourbon street for tips. And he hung around with people like Sullivan Rock, Kid Stormy Weather, and Toots Washington, and soaked up a little bit of their piano style, and made sure to include plenty of what Jelly Roll Morton called the Spanish tinge.

[Professor Longhair and the Shuffling Hungarians – “Mardi Gras in New Orleans” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here's a song that should be the state song for Louisiana, “Mardi Gras in New Orleans,” Professor Longhair and the Shuffling Hungarians oughta see the Zulu King.

[Professor Longhair and the Shuffling Hungarians – “Mardi Gras in New Orleans”]

[sound of a plane]

Bob Dylan: That was the enigmatic Professor Longhair,

Bob Dylan: Excuse me, plane just passed by. I wonder where they’re heading. Maybe they’re going to El Paso, well if they are, I know what they’ll be listening to on the radio – this song “El Paso” by Marty Robbins. A song he wrote in a car while he was driving his family through Texas, on a way to Arizona. It’s a vivid western saga laden with drama, violence, and romance. Mitch Miller turned down the song, because he thought it was too long. And (at) 4 and a half minutes it was longer than most songs being played on country radio. But no one could deny the quality, the sound of Marty Robbins voice and the beautiful guitar figure of Grady Martin, make this a song of rare beauty and elegance. From 19 and 59, the number one smash hit – no matter what Mitch Miller thought – here’s “El Paso.” Talking about a woman who is as different from other women as cognac is from corn liquor. But as Marty Robbins would know you get the same kind of headache from either one.

[Marty Robbins – “El Paso”]

Bob Dylan: That was the song about important port of entry to the United States from Mexico, “El Paso,” the birth place of Vikki Carr, Sam Donaldson, Sandra Day O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, and Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies, Irene Ryan.

[“Hi there! This is Granny speaking!”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s chart-topping smash by Mr. Wilbert Harrison, recorded for Bobby Robinson, in 19 and 59, and features the barbed wire guitar of Wild Jimmy Spruill. You all know this song, and it always sounds good. Wilber Harrison, “Kansas City.”

[Wilbert Harrison – “Kansas City”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Kansas City” by Wilbert Harrison.

[“Blue Hawaii” excerpt:
“I've got to get a job.”
“And I (gather) not in your father's pineapple plant?”
“No, ma'am. That's not for me. Hawaii has a big future. I-I-I wanna become a part of it. This place is growing by leaps and bounds There are more tourists come here than any other state in the Union. I know every (angle of) this island, I make a good tourist guide. I'm young, healthy, I’m not too stupid!”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s wild record by Sol K. Bright’s Hollywaiians. By the way, the “K.” stands for “Kekipi.” He was born in Honolulu and he beace famous as a composer, musician, comic dancer, producer, director, and actor. He joined Sol Hoopii's orchestra in 19 and 28, and then formed his own band, he wrote the "Polynesian Love Song," and this number, all about Hawaiian cowboys. This record’s from 19 and 36, and you could bet Don Helm(s), who played steel guitar with Hank Williams was listening.

[Sol K. Bright and his Hollywaiians – “Hawaiian Cowboy” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s that Hawaiian cowboy, and he’s find a horse who’s ride as smooth like a (moonfish), and who’s crouch, forget about. There’s a good name for a horse in here too – Roselani.

[Sol K. Bright and his Hollywaiians – “Hawaiian Cowboy”]

Bob Dylan: That was Sol K. Bright and his Hollywaiians, all about the Hawaiian cowboy, here on Theme Time Radio Hour, as we go from state to state. You know, Hawaii was the last state to join the Union in 19 and 59, and the 50th star was added to the flag on 4th of July 19 and 60. Hawaii’s major industries are sugarcane, pineapples and relaxation. They have their own time zone there, and they don’t believe in daylight savings time.

[excerpt from Jack Teagarden – “Stars Fell on Alabama”]

Bob Dylan: We have Alabama to thank for great baseball players like Hank Aaron, (who) was born in Mobile, and “Willie” Howard Mays, who was born in Westfield. A lot of great stuff comes from Alabama – Huntsville is known as the rocket capital of the world, and Alabama workers built furst rocket to put humans on the Moon. But what goes up, must come down, and here’s a man with a voice as comfortable as a pair of old shoes.

[Jack Teagarden – “Stars Fell on Alabama” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: This is Jack Teagarden, living his little drama, kissing in field of white, while stars fell on Alabama.

[Jack Teagarden – “Stars Fell on Alabama”]

Bob Dylan: “Stars Fell on Alabama.” That was Jack Teagarden, whom everybody used to call “Big T.” One of the top pre-(be)bop trombonists or as the English folks call it “the sackbut.” He was also a great singer between 1947 and 19 and 51 he played along with Louis Armstrong and the All-Stars – I recommend you search out those records.

[Tom Waits – “Jersey Girl” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s (the keep take-up a song?). Another favorite, on Theme Time Radio Hour, the love song, written about the quintessential Jersey girl, her name is Kathleen Brennan, and she is a playwright. New Jersey has the highest population density in the United States, and the most car thefts. But on the plus side, it has the most diners, and I'm not sure if this is good or bad, but it has the most shopping malls in one area. The lightbulb, the phonograph, the motion picture projector were all invented by Thomas Alva Edison is his Menlo Park laboratory. But all the great things that came out of New Jersey don’t hold the candle to Kathleen Brennan, at least not in Tom’s eye.

[Tom Waits – “Jersey Girl”]

Bob Dylan: Tom Waits, “Jersey Girl.” A lot of famous people came out of New Jersey. But none more famous than (???) Jack Nicholson – he does more acting with one eyebrow than anybody else does with their entire body. Jack has been in over 69 films, and he’s a splendid didnner companion.

[AS GOOD AS IT GETS excerpt
MELVIN: Three eggs over easy. Two sausages, six strips of bacon, with fries, short stack, coffee with cream and sweetener.
CAROL: You're gonna die soon with that diet, you know that?
MELVIN: Ah we're all gonna die soon.]

Bob Dylan: We got an email from (Mag Melampus) from Skokie, Illinois. She writes: “Dear Bob, My mom keeps trying to tell me that hillbilly music was the original gangster rap. I think she’s screwy. What do you think?” Well, Mag, first of all, it’s not nice to talk about your mother like that, and she’s not totally wrong. Hillbilly music had no shortage of lust, murder, and mayhem. Of course they didn’t have as many samples from Herbie Hancock records.

[an excerpt from the unknown song]

Bob Dylan: But I think if you’ll listen to this, you’ll be surprised, just [an excerpt from the unknown song stops playing] how violent it is.

[The Louvin Brothers – “Knoxville Girl” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: The Louvin Brothers, Charlie and Ira, with the tale of the Knoxville Girl.

[The Louvin Brothers – “Knoxville Girl”]

Bob Dylan: The Louvin Brothers, and the tale of the Knoxville Girl. We’re looking at the great cities of the United States of America. Right now we’re gonna go to one that was founded in 18 and 21, it was originally known as LeFleur's Bluff; Otis Span comes from there, so does Papa Charlie McCoy, Leanne Rimes, Eudora Welty, Cassandra Wilson, professional football player Walter Payton, and unit of measure, Fred Smoot.

[Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood – “Jackson” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: You might know it by Johnny Cash and June Carter, but here it is by Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood, they’re going to Jackson, and it’s hotter than a pepper sprout.

[Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood – “Jackson”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Jackson,” here on Theme Time Radio Hour. Jackson became the focal point while the Civil Rights struggle in the 60’s. Martin Lither King Jr., Stokely Carmichael, and Medgar Evers forked diligently to organise demonstrations and to protest activities in local churches, restaurants, and homes. Evers was shot outside his home on Jackson’s northwest side, on June 12 19 and 63. Byron De La Beckwith was tried twice for the murder, but the trials, which were both held before all-white juries, failed to bring in the conviction. The dramatic story of this prologue pursuit of justice is played out in a book, and movie “Ghosts of Mississippi,” which features some fine acting by Alec Baldwin in a role of Bobby DeLaughter.

[Ghosts of Mississippi excerpt:
DeLaughter: I`m asking you twelve ladies and gentlemen to act boldly; to hold this defendant accountable and find him guilty... simply because it is right, it is just, and Lord knows, it is time. Is it ever too late to do the right thing?]

Bob Dylan: Percy Mayfield had one of the most distinctive voices in R&B, and he was shockingly handsome. His record “Please Send Me Someone to Love” was number one in 1950. He held the world by the tail. Percy was in a terrible car accident in 19 and 52, which left him facially disfigured, he didn’t stop writing though. He became one of Ray Charles’ favorite songwriters, and Ray recorded a lot of his songs, such as, “Two Years of Torture,” “At the Club,” and perhaps the one he’s best known for, “Hit the Road Jack.” Percy’s records have never been equaled.

[Percy Mayfield – “Louisiana” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s the man himself Percy Mayfield singing a song all anout his home state – “Louisiana.”

[Percy Mayfield – “Louisiana”]

Bob Dylan: That was Percy Mayfield and “Louisiana.” Louisiana is the only state that still refers to the Napoleonic code, and it’s state law. If you don’t know what the Napoleonic code is, here’s Marlon Brando to explain it to you.

[A Streetcar Named Desire excerpt:
Stanley Kowalski: Now we got here in the state of Louisiana what's known as the Napoleonic code. You see, now according to that, what belongs to the wife belongs to the husband also, and vice versa... ]

[Tommy-gun sound]

Bob Dylan: Maybe a few innocent men did get killed, but it got things done, – that’s the kinda phrase you hear around Chicago. Somebody else who knew about Chicago was Carl Sandburg, he called Chicago
“The Hog Butcher for the World,
Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat,
Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler...”
There’s a lot of jobs (that we have) in Chicago. Tin Ear Tanner has a problem holding on to any of them. Give a listen.

[Tin Ear Tanner – “I Used to Work in Chicago”]

Bob Dylan: That was Tin Ear Tanner, “I Used to work in Chicago.” I know what you’re wandering, who was Tin Ear Tanner? Well that was a band that was put together by Tex Atchison, who was a popular fiddler and singer, who worked with Gene Autry and his playing there with Cliffy Stone, accordion player Art Wenzel, and the great Merle Travis on guitar. On Beltone record label, a song about that Big Shoulder town, and the work opportunities there. The first regulation baseballs were made in Chicago, by Albert G. Spaulding. And Hugh Hefner started Playboy magazine right there in Chicago.

Bob Dylan: Next up, is a song all about one of big ship building centers of our country. A lot of oil refineries and biotechnology there. The hometown of Ella Fitzgerald, Thurgood Marshall, Johhny Unitas, and the great Edgar Allan Poe. Of course, I’m talking about Baltimore. A lot of dramas happens in Baltimore, you can see it on Homicide or The Wire. But there’s also a drama that happened much earlier. For example, the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904, it raged from 10:48 am on February 7th to 5 pm on February 8th. Over 12 hundred firefighters were required to bring the blaze under control. The great Charlie Poole recorded a song all about this fire, he reported the news. This is Charlie Poole hearing the cry from every breeze that passes by, “Baltimore Fire.”

[Charlie Poole – “Baltimore Fire”]

Bob Dylan: That was Charlie Poole, telling us all about the Baltimore Fire. Immediately after the fire Mayor Robert McLane was quoted in the Baltimore News, he said: “To suppose that the spirit of our people could not rise to the occasion is to suppose that our people are not genuine Americans.” He then refused assistance, saying: “As head of this municipality, I cannot help but feel gratified by the sympathy and the offers of practical assistance. To them I have in general terms replied, 'Baltimore will take care of its own, thank you.'" Baltimore rose from the ashes. A fine example of the “can do” spirit that makes America great! Kudos, Baltimore!

[“Mississippi takes its name from the great winding big river that forms at western boundary of the state.” ]

[train horn sound]

Bob Dylan: Let’s head down the Mighty Mississip’ and step off in Mississippi, with a little old band from Texas “ZZ Top,” or as they call them in Russia “Zed-Zed Top.”

[ZZ Top – “My Head's in Mississippi” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: This Dusty Hill on base guitar, Frank Beard playing the drums, and Billy Gibbons (...safety) in Mississippi.

[ZZ Top – “My Head's in Mississippi”]

Bob Dylan: I'm all outta breath just listening to that! That was ZZ Top, talking about Mississippi – the cradle of the blues. I ran into Billy Gibbons at a taco wagon, we got a-talkin’, a he told me why his Head’s in Mississippi. Billy?

[Billy Gibbons: Now we’re talking serious stuff here, My Head's in Mississippi. Not being born (by ...) to a cottonfield, but appreciating and, and paying careful attention to that artform we called blues. My Head's in Mississippi— it’s the Salvador Dali of the Delta. My Head's in Mississippi... I guess it’s contemporary, it is bluesy, and it is blues, when you listen to it, think about it. And naked cowgirl floating across the ceiling – yeah – if we didn’t have that we’d all have the blues.]

Bob Dylan: Thank you, Billy. All this traveling is tiring me out. I got time for maybe one more song. Here on Theme time Radio Hour we believe, you can never play too much Bob Wills, we’re gonna prove it by playing another one of his records. This one is about second largest city in Oklahoma, it’s located in the northeast part of the state, on the Arkansas River, it was settled in the 1830’s by Creek Indians from Alabama, who were forcefully sent to the area under the Indian Removal Act of 18 and 30. Creek medicine man planted ashes form their old home at the new site, and the Creeks named the new village “(Tallasi),” meaning “Old Town,” in memory of their former home in Alabama. In time that village became known as Tulsa, and among famous people who were born there: Garth Brooks, Blake Edwards, Paul Harvey, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Leon Russell. And here’s the song that Leon probably heard going up, Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys – Take Me Back to Tulsa, I’m too young to— what?

[Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys – “Take Me Back to Tulsa”]

Bob Dylan: That was Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys. In Gruene, Texas, there’s an 8-foot-statue of Bob Wills.

[unknown march starts playing]

Bob Dylan: On Saturday, May 2nd, 200 and 6 vandals knocked it over, and knocked its arm off. Local radio stations offered a reward for information leading to an arrest, I don’t know if anyone was arrested, but if you’re listening – stop vandalizing that statue! Bob Wills is a national treasure, and must be respected.

[unknown march stops playing]

[unknown song starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Well, we got to go again, here on Theme Time Radio Hour. I’m gonna gas up the car, throw my bags in the trunk, get my trip-tick from AAA, and head out, and visit a few more of these fine cities. We’ll be bacj again next week, with more Theme Time Radio Hour. I’ll see you in the highway!

[“Top Cat (underscore)”]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “School.”


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 04:57 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 28th, 2008, 19:54 GMT
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Victor--can help in some minor ways. The first song introducing "Musical Map" is the Nelson Riddle Orch. playing the Theme from "Route 66". The final song is "America the Beautiful"--I haven't been able to track down the player yet.


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 15:11 GMT 
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Location: Oslo, Norway
the highways and the byways

and persuaded (everyone?) to let a new singer

going to see the Zulu King

And I gather not in your father's pineapple plant?

I know every inch of this island

Here's that Hawaiian cowboy, and his finer horse, whose ride is smooth like a (boonfish?), and whose crouch - forget about!

Here's a keepsake of a song. Another favorite here,

This Dusty Hill on bass guitar, Frank Beard playing the drums, and Billy Gibbons, hoping they'll find safety in Mississippi.

Not being born adjacent to a cottonfield,

paying careful attention to that artform we call the blues.

A naked cowgirl floating across the ceiling

This one is about the second largest city in Oklahoma

Creek Indians from Alabama, who were forcibly sent to the area

Creek medicine man planted ashes from their old home at the new site


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 18:38 GMT 

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The Herbie Hancock cut--played before "Knoxville Girl"--is "Hang Up Your Hang Ups"


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 19:18 GMT 
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The Great Wandu wrote:
The Herbie Hancock cut--played before "Knoxville Girl"--is "Hang Up Your Hang Ups"


And fwiw, Mr. D's cryptic comment about hillibillies "didn’t have as many samples from Herbie Hancock records" before playing the snippet from "Hang Up Your Hang Ups" is probably an oblique reference to NWA's "100 Miles and Runnin'" a gangsta rap song that did indeed sample "Hang Up Your Hang Ups."


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 19:31 GMT 
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Quote:
Fred Smoot. - I understand, it was another "Smoot" after whom unit of measure was named, Fred Smoot appears to a football player. Is there some joke I'm not getting, research team screwed up, or I mixed everything?


I think it's probably another example of Eddie G.'s off-the-wall humor. Football player Fred Smoot is indeed from Jackson, while the "unit of measurement" is one Oliver Smoot.

Given that Gorodetsky probably crossed the Harvard Bridge more than once while he lived in Boston and saw the Smoot markings, it likely amused him when he was researching people from Jackson for the script to find the other Smoot's name.


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 20:02 GMT 
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And finally, the march music used as the underscore for the story of the vandalism of the Bob Wills statue sounds as if it's a variation of the "Dragnet" theme, probably incidental music used on the TV show or in one of the two movies.


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PostPosted: Tue September 14th, 2010, 21:17 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
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Location: Ukraine
Thank you all guys very much!
Sounds like "America the Beautiful" is performed by Herb Ellis.
Not so sure yet which version of "Dragnet" is used.. But anyways - information you gave me should be more than enough) Thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed September 15th, 2010, 00:46 GMT 
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take me back to Tulsa, I'm too young to marry ---

(Tommy Duncan/Bob Wills)



The big bee sucks the blossom
And the little bee makes the honey
Poor man throws the cotton
And the rich man makes the money

Take me back to Tulsa, I'm too young to marry
Take me back to Tulsa, I'm too young to marry

We travel all over this country wide
Playing music by the hour
Always wear this great big smile
We never do look sour

Take me back to Tulsa, I'm too young to marry
Take me back to Tulsa, I'm too young to marry


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PostPosted: Wed September 15th, 2010, 03:55 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
thanks ocgypsy:)

...talking about "Dragnet" again - as I can hear, it's version by Bobby Morganstein - http://www.amazon.com/Dragnet/dp/B001F6 ... 487&sr=1-4 - hard to tell for certain though.

I overlooked to ask about one little but still pretty interesting detail - Mr. Dylan's characteristic of Jack Nicholson: "But none more famous than (???) Jack Nicholson – he does more acting with one eyebrow than anybody else does with their entire body."


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PostPosted: Fri September 17th, 2010, 00:45 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Hey guys, that spot about Jack Nicholson still unsettled...


Meanwhile, here's the School.
First of all, there are two kinds of marching songs playing: First after Graham Parker's “Back to Schooldays” - more accurately, after a message from Carla Thomas, while Mr. Dylan is talking about cheerleaders.
Second - after Babs Gonzales' song, while talking about college mascots.

And there is some kind of organ music playing while Mr. Dylan taling about what valedictorian is.

I'm guessing at least two of these tunes should be familiar to all former American high school students.

Plus: After the last song, Mr. Dylan is saying: "That was Guillotine and golf aficionado – Alice Cooper, (???) us to the end of school year." Need a help with those question marks.
Do you think Bob Dylan played golf with Alice Cooper?




21 School



“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. A writer stares at a blank sheet of paper. A pet poodle scratches at a window.

“The Lady in Red”: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

[Nat 'King' Cole Trio – “You Don't Learn That In School” plays in the background]

Bob Dylan: Welcome to Theme Time Radio Hour. School’s now in session. Please, take your seats – take that gum out of your mouth! – and pay attention, there’s plenty of lessons to learn. Today we’re gonna talk about school. The school of thought, and the school of hard knocks.

[Nat 'King' Cole Trio – “You Don't Learn That In School” stops to play in the background]

[Fast Times at Ridgemont High excerpt:
“Wait. Did you hear the bell ring?”)]

Bob Dylan: Let’s take the roll and start out with the guy who was part of the whole pub-rock scene, over in England. The pub rock scene was the roots based musical movement in the mid-70’s that was kind of a reaction to the overproduced popular music of the day. The punk rockers were the big fans of the pub rock music scene, and there was a certain amount of overlap. Some people thought this guy was a bit of a punk, but I just thought he make good records.

[Graham Parker – “Back to School Days” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: This is Graham Parker, “Back to School Days.”

[Graham Parker – “Back to Schooldays”]

Bob Dylan: That was Graham Parker playing along with Brinsley Schwarz, and Martin Belmont, “Back to Schooldays,” from the 19 and 76 album “Howlin’ Wing.”

[Carla Thomas: Hi, Carla Thomas Speaking. Listen, there’s no harm in staying in school – you gain so much, and you have so much more to offer to your country, yourself, and to other young people who will follow in your footsteps. There’s a key to the door of your future – in the classroom – go and get it, and do something with it. ]

Bob Dylan: This is Theme Time Radio Hour, and it ain’t all about reading, writing, and arithmetic, sometimes it’s about sports.

[famous school march playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: And wherever there’s sports, there’s gonna be cheerleaders. And you won’t believe some of the people who started out of school cheerleaders. I’m sure you wouldn’t be surprised to hear that Ann-Margaret, Paula Abdul, and Halle Berry were cheerleaders, but what about Katie Couric, and two of our Presidents? George W. Bush, and Dwight David Eisenhower were both cheerleaders. As was Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Steve Martin, Trent Lott, Samuel L. Jackson, and Madonna – well I could believe Madonna.

[Cheerleaders]

Bob Dylan: This next record is by Tommy Facenda, he was one of Gene Vincent’s Blue Caps, and this is a crazy record. This song is called “High School USA,” and Tommy recorded like 40 versions of it. The first version mention all of the local high schools around Norfolk, Virginia. He recorded 40 different versions, each version about the different city mentioning the local high schools of that area. We don’t have time to play all 40 version, so I’m just gonna play my favorite. Here’s “High School USA (The Minneapolis/St. Paul Version)” by Tommy Facenda.

[Tommy Facenda – “High School USA (Minneapolis/St Paul version)”]

Bob Dylan: That was Tommy Facenda, kicking it old school with “High School USA – the Minneapolis/St Paul version.” Like I said, he did like 40 versions of it, recorded them all in like two days. Imagine what the last version must have sounded like! (laughs) I get tired just doing this radio show! (laughts). As older teachers retire, school districts have stepped up their hiring, especially in rural and inner city areas. I wonder what Tommy Facenda would have had to say about that.

Bob Dylan: I remember when I was back in school, the teacher said: “If you have to go to the bathroom, just raise your hand.” I asked: “How’s that gonna stop it?”

[James Brown – “Don't Be a Dropout” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s one of the great teachers, the father of gunk, the great hit-maker, has never lost sight of his place, as a conscious to his community. James Brown in the middle of all his hit-making, he still found time to record this important message – “Don't Be a Dropout.”

[James Brown – “Don't Be a Dropout”]

Bob Dylan: That was James Brown, without an education you might as well be dead, “Don’t Be a Dropout.” On Theme Time Radio Hour, your school for themes, dreams, and schemes. Your university of perversity. James Brown, a Barnwell, South Carolina native, he ran afoul of the law the law by the late 40’s with an armed robbery conviction, and got much of his education at the Alto Reform School, but he learned from his mistakes, and tried to spread the gospel of education.

[Les Paul and Mary Ford ad:
“Hi, this is Les Paul.”
“And Mary Ford”
School bells ring and children sing
It's back to Robert Hall again.
Mother knows for better clothes
It's back to Robert Hall again.
You'll save more on clothes for school
Shop at Robert Hall!]

Bob Dylan: Here’s the man who brought rock ‘n’ roll into America’s living room, week after week. You got to remember, there was no MTV, there were no channels showing rock ‘n’ roll around the clock. You had to figure out where you could find it, and sometimes it was only three minutes a week talked away on some show, like The Ed Sullivan Show. But Ricky Nelson changed lot of that as one of the stars of his parent’s TV-show – Ozzie and Harriet – he was given central stage to perform a song just about every week. Alongside Ricky was the magical guitarist James Burton. Ricky gets kind of a bad wrap, and isn’t considered as high (the rocker), as people like Elvis, Gene Vincent, and Carl Perkins. But for my money, he’s right up there, in the stratosphere.

[Ricky Nelson – “Waiting in School”]

Bob Dylan: That was Ricky Nelson, a man who agreed with Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who once said: “The school is the last expenditure upon which America should be willing to economize.” By the way, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was also a cheerleader, as well as being our 32nd President.

[Fast Times At Ridgemont High excerpt:
“I have one question for you – can you attend my class? It is for your own good, and you can’t make it, I can make you.”]

Bob Dylan: You’re listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, get your nose out of the book, you get an “E” for effort just for attendance.

[Fast Times At Ridgemont High excerpt:
“Sorry I’m late, it’s just like this new schedules totally confusing”]

Bob Dylan: Let’s go to our next class, it’s being taught by Otis Rush, the left-handed guitarist, who came to fame with a wondrous strick of records for the Cobra label. Songs like: “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” “My Love Will Never Die,” “Three Times a Fool,” and “All Your Love.” Some of the most atmospheric blues records ever made. In the early 60’s he moved over to Duke Records, with Don Robey, ad recorded this track, all about why he’s having difficulty doing his homework. I’d just like to point out, at the time of recording this song Otis Rush was 28-years-old. What kind of homework was he doing?

[Otis Rush – “Homework”]

Bob Dylan: Otis Rush, “Homework.”

Bob Dylan: Well any visit to the university would not be complete without checking in on the coeds, Harry Reser loves the coeds, and he’s gonna sing about them here, along with His Six Jumping Jacks. During the 20’s and 30’s Harry Reser played in a number of bands, including, The Jazz Pilots, The Campus Boys, The Rounders, The Park Lane Orchestra, The Clicquot Club and Bill Ridges and His Orchestra. Harry was an influential banjo player, showing amazing clarity and technique, he loved performing novelty songs, like this one, “I Love the College Girls.” Like Bob Wills, he enjoyed throwing it spoken interjections, which give the songs a sense of immediacy, and fun.

[Harry Reser and his 6 Jumping Jacks – “I Love the College Girls”]

Bob Dylan: That was Harry Reser and his Six Jumping Jacks, professing his love for the girls who matriculate, “I Love the College Girls.” I certainly do! If he likes the college girls so much, he should hang around at some of the women’s colleges, perhaps he should go to Barnard, or Smith, Mount Holyoke is nice, so is the college of St. Benedict, and Wellesley college of course, in Wellesley, Massachusetts. Women now make up 56% of the college population, and that number continues to rise – way to go, ladies!

[Violent Is the Word for Curly (1938) excerpt:
“You'll just love it. Mildew has a lovely student body.”
"Yours wouldn't be too bad, either, if you took off about 20 pounds!"
“What?!”
“Come on (sister) let’s go”]

Bob Dylan: Horace Man once said: “A teacher who is attempting to teach without inspiring the pupil with a desire to learn is hammering on cold iron.” Here are The Marquees, on Okeh Records. They were a group that was only together a short time, matter of fact, I only think they made one record, they recorded it in Bo Diddley’s basement studio, and in the band was the young man named Marvin, Marvin Gaye, who later went on the great fame when he moved up north to Michigan, and was one of the biggest artists, on the home of the hit, Motown Records. But for now, give a listen to Marvin along with Chester Simmons, Reese Palmer and James Nolan – The Marquees.

[The Marquees – “Hey, Little School Girl”]

Bob Dylan: That was The Marquees, “Hey, Little School Girl.”

Bob Dylan: Mark Twain, was no ding gong, he once said: “I never let my schooling interfere with my education.” On the other hand, Victor Hugo once said: “He who opens a school door, closes a prison.”

Bob Dylan: Brenda Holloway was one of the sexiest singers on the Motown label, The Beatles certainly thought so, they gave her an opening slot on their 1965 American tour, it’s a dead sin she’s pretty much forgotten nowadays. Except for the fact that she wrote and recorded the original version of "You've Made Me So Very Happy." A song that was later (became) a big hit by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears. Here’s Brenda Holloway with a little bit of help from The Supremes, with an important message – “Play it Cool, Stay in School.”

[Brenda Holloway with The Supremes – Play it Cool, Stay in School]

Bob Dylan: That was Breanda Holloway, cranking it out with “Stay in School.” While we’re on that subject, here’s a poem by Gwendolyn Brooks, called We Real Cool:
We real cool. We
Left school. We

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

Long(Sing) sin.
Sing thin. We

Thin gin. We
Jazz June. We
Die soon.
Right on, Gwendolyn.

Bob Dylan: There are many kinds of teachers: the shop teachers, Latin teachers, there’s professors of law, professors of medicine. (And) one of my favorites, Babs Gonzales – he’s professor Bop. Babs was the pioneering scat singer, and a great talent scout. On this record he presents Sonny Rollins, in one of his first appearances, along with J.J. Johnson on a trombone, Wynton Kelly on a piano, and Roy Haynes on drums.

[Babs Gonzales – “Professor Bop”]

Bob Dylan: That was Babs Gonzales and His Orchestra, from the college of musical knowledge, “Professor Bob.” Check out Babs’ autobiographies, he wrote two of them, and they’re more colorful than they are accurate. Imagine that!

[another march starts playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: You know, a lot of college sports teams have mascots, here’s a couple of our favorites: Albert the costumed alligator mascot, for the Florida Gators; Dunker the Inflatable Horse, Murray State University; Sammy the Slug, is a banana slug, and a mascot of the UC Santa Cruz; WuShock, is an anthropomorphic shock of wheat, the mascot of Wichita State University, – and believe me, (he’s) quite a sight to see; and finally – go down to the Z’s – Zippy the Kangaroo – you can see Zippy at the University of Akron, and he's all that he's cracked up to be.

[another march stops playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: You know, here on Theme Time Radio Hour, we have a bunch of favorite artists – they’re kind of our mascots. Sam Cooke is a favorite here, on Theme Time Radio Hour, and he wrote most of his songs himself, but he had a little bit of high-profile help on this number – Lou Adler, and Herp Albert helped him write this song, which reached number two on the R&B charts, and number twelve on the pop charts. “Wonderful World,” Sam Cooke.

[Sam Cooke – “Wonderful World”]

Bob Dylan: That was Sam Cooke, and hearing that song it’s pretty obvious that today’s subject is “School.” And let me help Sam out a little. Sam, you don’t know much about History – well The Battle of Hastings was fought in 1066. You say, you don’t know much about Biology? The Cerebrum is the largest region of the mammalian brain. And if you don’t know much about a Science book, let me hip ya, that the Kinetic and Potential energy of a body is the result of motion, and determined by the product of its mass and the square of velocity. And finally, if you don’t know what Slide Rule is for – it used to be the most commonly used calculation tool in science and engineering; it’s kind of a mechanical analogue computer, consisting of at least two finely divided scales. So now you know a lot, about a lot of things.

[Rock 'n' Roll High School (1979) excerpt:
“I'd just like to say to all students everywhere – that you may think the school is yours for a while, but it's always run by the principal and her administration.”
“What would you have done with the school anyway?”
“Rock the roof of it!”]

[Gene Summers – “School of Rock ‘n' Roll” playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: You know, nowadays seems like the only subject on the school of rock ‘n’ roll is Electric Guitar. But other instruments have always been just as important. Listen to the piano playing on this record, it just pushes the thing along, without that piano the guitarist might as well just drop out. Here’s Gene Summers.

[Gene Summers – “School of Rock ‘n' Roll”]

Bob Dylan: That was Gene Summers, from Dallas, Texas, where they shoot presidents, and shoot people who shoot presidents. Where the school of rock ‘n’ roll in session all year long.

Bob Dylan: I feel obligated to tell you that the school of rock ‘n’ roll is just one type of school. Here’s some alternative schools. The Global School of Private Investigation, The ABC Bartending School, Dave’s Accordion School at Atwater Village, Cook Street School of Fine Cooking, Second Nature School of Taxidermy, The Superior Fashion Institute of Montreal, and The Eastern School of Musical Instrument Repair. Seek out these fine avenues of higher learning.

Bob Dylan: Here’s a quick question for ya – a kind of pop quiz – what does these people have in common? Johnny Bench, Cindy Crawford, W.C. Handy, William Rehnquist, Emmylou Harris, Alicia Keyes, Conan O'Brien, Weird Al Yankovic, and W.E.B Du Bois? If you answered “A – They were all valedictorian of their class,” you’d be correct.

[organ music is playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: Valedictorian is the top graduate of the graduating class of an educational institution. They have the traditional role as the last speaker at the graduation ceremony. I wonder if William Rehnquist gave the same type of speech as Weird Al Yankovic. Somehow I Doubt it.

[organ music stops playing in the background]

[Jingle:
“School bells ringing, (returns the) golden rule
Children singing – (let’s back to) school!
Vacation’s over except to sing
Maybe one last (frame) before the big day.
School bells ringing, children singing
And here’s the best way to start September singing,
Going back to school – the school days are here.”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s a band that’s been around for more than thirty years – NRBQ. It stands for “New Rhythm and Blues Quartet,” or “...Quintet,” depending on how many members they have in a band at any given time.
The piano player Terry Adams somehow manages to sound like Jerry Lee Lewis and Thelonious Monk at the same time. Here they are, from their album “All Hopped Up” with kind of an Everly Brothers sounding song, called “Still in School.”

[NRBQ – “Still in School”]

Bob Dylan: That was NGBQ on Red Rooster Records “Still in School,” here on Theme Time Radio Hour. They probably to be the teacher’s pet – the student, who is especially liked by teachers, and receive special treatment from them. But be careful, if you try to become a teacher’s pet, you might find yourself on the business end of a school bully’s fist.

[Lulu – “To Sir with Love” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: And now a gal fro Glasgow, Scotland, who’s gonna sing about the man, who took her from crayons to perfume. It’s Lulu with “To Sit with Love.”

[Lulu – “To Sir with Love”]

Bob Dylan: That’s Lulu, with the title track to the Sidney Poitier movie from 19 and 67, where he plays a schoolteacher in a tough London high school. Look for Lulu playing one of the students. I love this version of “To Sir With Love.” Perhaps the weirdest version I ever heard was the one Michael Stipe and Natalie Merchant sang during the presidential inauguration of Bill Clinton. Definitely a man who could take you “from crayons to perfume.”

[page turns]

Bob Dylan: One of the greatest movies about schools is “High School Confilential” where a tough kid comes to a new high school and begins muscling his way into a drug scene.

[High School Confidential! (1958) excerpt
“What about maryjane?”
“Oh I- I’d like five pounds.”
“Five pounds, man!? I don’t carry nothing like that. Just stick or two, you know what I mean? (takes up a) couple of the heads at school.”]

Bob Dylan: As he moves his way up the ladder, a schoolteacher tries to reform him, his aunt Gwen played by the curvy Mamie Van Doren tries to seduce him, and the "weedheads" are eager to use his newly found enterprise, but he has his own agenda. To find out more, you gonna have to watch the movie. And there’s a real treat in the opening credits – Jerry Lee Lewis on a flat bed truck singing the title song, here it is – sounds as good, as the day it was recorded, “High School Confidential.” The killer.

[Jerry Lee Lewis – “High School Confidential”]

Bob Dylan: That was Jerry Lee Lewis, “High School Confidentional.” If you see it in a movie theatre, when Jerry singing the title song, take a look at a bass player, that’s J.W. Brown, his daughter Myra Gale married Jerry Lee. That didn’t go over too good, ‘cause she was quite young. Jerry was on tour overseas when news of his marriage came out in a press, “High School Confidential” dropped right off the charts, and Jerry’s career was never the same. I wonder if Myra dropped out of school.

[Otis Redding PSA:
“Hi! This is The Big O. – Otis Redding! I was just standing here, thinking about you, thought I’d write a song about you! And dedicate it you! Take a listen!
If you didn't go back to school this year you're really not groovy
Maybe you think that school is a drag, it just don't move you
But did you ever think about how square you look standing
In an employment line because school didn't interest you
You really oughta think about it
Without an education you can only be a tramp
Brogan shoes, no haircut, just plain old country
Don't worry 'bout the fellows on the corner calling you green
Because you're bettering your future condition
You really oughta think about it
And furthermore tell them that Otis Redding saved you very wisely
‘Cause you'll be at the top
When they get there if they make it
When they get there if they make it
When they get there if they make it
You really ought to think about it”]

Bob Dylan: (While) we’ve got an email, and whoever wrote it must have had some good schooling, ‘cause every word is spelled correctly. Let me look here, who is it from... Ah, here it is! Bob Hilburn from Los Angeles, California. He writes: “Dear Bob! I recently retired and have some extra time on my hands. I’m thinking about going back to school, but I can’t decide what area of education to pursue. Any ideas?” Signed “Bob.” Well, Bob, I don’t really know you that well, so I’d be hesitant to suggest anything. However, I will say that the University of Michigan in Ann Arborn has a good curriculum including Behavioral Neuroscience, perhaps, Experimental Psychology might be more of your bag? They teach that pretty good at Princeton. Harvard University, of course, has a stellar Historical Sociology department, and they don’t care about sex or gender. But whatever you decide, my heads off to you for climbing back on the educational horse.

[neigh]

Bob Dylan: Graduation is almost here. But before we put on our gowns, and throw our mortarboard in the air, we got time for one last song. And what could be more appropriate than the national anthem of summer vacation? Courtesy of Mr. Vincent Furnier, who put on demonic make-up and changed his name to Alice Cooper. No more teacher’s dirty looks, school’s out.

[Alice Cooper – “School's Out” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: They ain’t got no class, ain’t got no principle. I can’t even think of the word that rhymes.

[Alice Cooper – “School's Out”]

Bob Dylan: That was Guillotine and golf aficionado – Alice Cooper, (???) us to the end of school year.

[Sonny Boy Williamson – “Good Morning Schoolgirl” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Well, it’s time for me to say goodbye and it seems hardly fair, because to you listeners, the school year’s just beginning. But don’t worry, summer’s around the corner, when it gets here we’ll be here with ya, on Theme Time Radio Hour. Now go do your homework.

[“Top Cat (underscore)”]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. Travel arrangements courtesy Sabudio International Airport. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “The telephone.”

Bob Dylan: I went to a tough high school, even the debating team was on steroids.


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PostPosted: Sun September 19th, 2010, 03:49 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Okay, I've got it - "noted thespian" it was about Nicholson.
But with the rest of questions (about "School") I Really need help. Pliiiz! :)


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PostPosted: Sun September 19th, 2010, 06:30 GMT 
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That was Guillotine and golf aficionado – Alice Cooper, ushering us to the end of school year.


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PostPosted: Sun September 19th, 2010, 09:12 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Karl Erik wrote:
That was Guillotine and golf aficionado – Alice Cooper, ushering us to the end of school year.


Right! Makes perfect sense. Thanks, Karl!


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PostPosted: Wed September 29th, 2010, 02:18 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Only one question, probably not easy one: Right before Blondie's song, there's something can be heard on the background - like coin being dropped on the jukebox, and some music - perhaps an excerpt from some movie starring Debbie Harry? Maybe some extended version of “Hanging on a Telephone”. Maybe something else. If you got any idea, please, don't be shy to share:)

Dylan's voice on this one sounds a little bit off - like he's been recording on his own - with no assistance from Eddie G.(?).. So I couldn't understand some minor moments right away, but none of them seem to be essential in regard of understanding the point.

Mr. Dylan again talking about golf... And at the beginning of the show he kinda often uses the word "which" - which don't seem to sound like him. Am I way off here?


22 Telephone




“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. The air is thick with a chemical. A woman takes a shower before going home to her husband.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan’s voice on the answering machine: Hello, this is Bob Dylan.

[Kraftwerk – “The Telephone Call” in the background]

Bob Dylan: It’s time for Theme Time Radio Hour, dreams, schemes and themes. From blues to boogie, from bop to rap. Tonight we’re gonna rich out and touch someone with the telephone. On the way to the studio I almost hit a telephone operator with my car. It was a close call.

[Kraftwerk – “The Telephone Call” in the background stops to play]

Bob Dylan: Telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell whose wife and mother were deaf. He invented it trying to improve (on a) telegraph, which was way of sending messages, which (...) just closed. He thought when people answered the phone, they should say “Ahoy-hoy.” (Instead of?) I just said “Hello.” He made his first telephone call to his assistant in 18 and 76. The first thing he ever said was: “Mr. Watson? Come here. I want you.” Here we have Elmore James saying almost the same thing with “Talk to Me, Baby.”

[Elmore James – “Talk to Me Baby”]

[Telephone ad:
Add a phone, add a lot to living,
Add convenience to your home!
Add a phone, add a lot to living,
Add an extension telephone! ]

Bob Dylan: They got a new Dial-a-Prayer for atheists, they call it “Nobody Answers.” Gospel always uses the new thing, now they even got the thing called the GodPod – and iPod with scripture in it, so you can listen wherever you go. Me, I’d rather listen to the Spirit of Memphis Quartet singing “Atomic Telephone.”

[Spirit of Memphis Quartet – “Atomic Telephone”]

Bob Dylan: “Atomic Telephone, use it for the good of all mankind; no man knows the power; can’t heal the sick, can’t (raise His hand?). “Atomic Telephone,” Spirit of Memphis Quartet.

[Glenn Miller Orchestra – “Pennsylvania 6-5000” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: “Pennsylvania 6-5000” – this was the phone number of the Hotel Pennsylvania, which at that time was known as the Statler hotel. And, Glenn Miller used to play there, this song was (sort of an) ad, (...) you could call up the Hotel and ask what time you could see him playing.

[Glenn Miller Orchestra – “Pennsylvania 6-5000” continues]

Bob Dylan: He also said that this was the phone number that he called when he proposed to his wife.

[Glenn Miller Orchestra – “Pennsylvania 6-5000”]

Bob Dylan: Glenn Miller was one of most popular entertainers in 30’s and 40’s and disappeared under mysterious circumstances during World War II, while on a flight to entertain US troops in France.

[“Hello?”]

Bob Dylan: Etta James, all you got to do is let me hear your voice. Etta still going strong, in 2000 and 3 she received a star on a Hollywood Walk of Fame. (I had to) call her, and congratulate her.

[Etta James – “842-3089”]

Bob Dylan: That was Etta James, sometimes known as Miss Peaches, discovered by Johnny Otis. “842-3089.” Do you ever wanna write a song with your phone number? Here’s a little tip: “Hero” rhymes with “Zero.”

Bob Dylan: This is Theme Time Radio Drizzle my Schnizzle. And this record is just a mystery, don’t know who it is, (whoever’s done) doesn’t stop me from playing it though. It’s just like phone (ringing) rings: you don’t know who it’s gonna be, but you gotta answer it.

[Eddy Gorman and His Group – “Telephone Blues” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: I feel like talking, been out bowling, phone is busy, I wonder who is on that line. “Telephone Blues,” Eddy Gorman and His Group.

[Eddy(Eddie?) Gorman and His Group – “Telephone Blues”]

Bob Dylan: Eddy Gorman and His Group, “Telephone Blues.”

[“Welcome to the Wurlitzer plant – home of the celebrated Wurlitzer coin-operated phonograph – or jukebox – as it is so fondly known throughout music loving America.”]

Bob Dylan: Originally the jukebox was used in Juke Joints, they’ve actually took the place of live entertainment. Jukebox was a way for people to hear music that was not played on the radio. The first one showed up in 1927, by The Automatic Music Instrument Company. By the 50’s there was a bunch of companies making Jukeboxes. Including, “Wurlitzer,” “Seabird” [The Seaburg], and your favorite–my favorite “Rock-Ola.” Is it hard decision, between the Jukebox and a phone? I think it depends on who’s on the other end of the phone.

[Lattie Moore – “The Jukebox and the Phone”]

Bob Dylan: Lattie Moore, from Scottsville, Kentucky. “I can’t make up my mind, whether to put dime in a Jukebox, or the phone; one dime’s all I’ve left, I wonder how many times I’ve called her on the phone (inhales); maybe I should play another sad song?” Among other sad songs Lattie wrote was “Out of Control” by George Jones. Here’s the man himself, George Jones, nicknamed “The Possum,” was born with a broken arm, grew up to be one of the finest singers in country music.

[George Jones – “Wrong Number”]

Bob Dylan: “My fingers tremble as they try to touch the phone; a sweet ‘Hello’ from you, my heart beats loudly; I bite my lip until the blood begins to flow; I keep the words ‘I love you’ deep inside of me.” George Jones.

[Don't Use the Phone!: Art Linkletter [1953]
This is Art Linkletter. In event of atomic bombing or some other catastrophe, here's something important to remember. It will help save lives including your own. Do not use the telephone! Leave the line open for official rescue and relief! This is your part in Civil Defense. Remember, don't use the phone! Leave the line clear for safety of your own life, and the lives of others!]

Bob Dylan: Party Lines became people’s everyday soap-opera. A bunch of people would share one phone line, and you could hear what other people were talking about. It was like listening to the radio, but it was people next door.

[The Kinks – “Party Line” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: So of course, it was fascinating. Here’s The Kinks.

[The Kinks – “Party Line”]

Bob Dylan: The Kinks. Here’s another song about Party Lines, courtesy of Mr. Cleanhead himself – Eddie Vinson. (And) he was called “Cleanhead,” because he burned all his hair off with hair-straightener. First time I heard this song it knocked my socks off.

[Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – “The People On My Party Line”]

Bob Dylan: That was Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson talking about a Party Line. “Mrs. Jackson, your dad is coming home, (inhales) People on my party line, I didn’t mean to listen (inhales); I need some lovin’, I need some money too.”

Bob Dylan: This is Theme Time Radio Hour, and we’re on the Telephone. Peter Wolf told me about a record he loves, by Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn. Pete?

[Peter Wolf: Well, speaking about telephones, there’s one song that just does it for me, this is song that, well, so unique because there’s two great country singers, you just pour a couple of glasses of bourbon and it don’t get any better than this.

[Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn – “As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone” starts playing]

Peter Wolf: Loretta Lynn, Conway Twitty, “As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone.”]

[Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn – “As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone”]

Bob Dylan: Jumping Jehoshaphat! You don't hear records like that anymore! We’re talking about the telephone today. Here’s Muddy Waters making a long distance call. Some long distance blues on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Muddy Waters – “Long Distance Operator”]

[“Long distance!”
“Operator, I’m calling Chicago. 8-1-2 4-6-8-2.”
“Thank you!”]

Bob Dylan: Pigmeat Markham. He was born Dewey Markham in 1904, in Durham, North Carolina. He got his nickname from a song he used to sing, called “Sweet Poppa Pigmeat." You might recognize him (when he) appeared on TV, on Rowan & Martin show, doing “Here Come the Judge.” This is from backside of the fifties, [Pigmeat Markham – “Your Wire's Been Tapped” starts playing] when he was doing a romantic song about wiretapping.

[Pigmeat Markham – Your Wire's Been Tapped]

Bob Dylan: “Alright. Wiretapping. Don’t answer it! Leave it alone! Things have changed, (there’s) nothing like it was. They say the coast is clear; she wants to go to beach. Watch it–skip it! Your Wire's Been Tapped. Your artificial romance has been scrapped.” Pigmeat Markham. The wirs wiretapping occurred during American Civil War, when government officials under the President Lincoln easedropped on telegraph conversations. Wiretapping has been carried up by most presidents, but it’s bad when they [some “strange music” starts to sound in the background] get caught doing it.

Bob Dylan: Blondie was a part of that CBGB’s crowd down the Bowery (...) early punk scene. [Blondie – “Hanging on a Telephone” starts playing] Here’s Debbie Harry and Blondie. They got me hanging on the telephone.

[Blondie – “Hanging on a Telephone”]

Bob Dylan: Debbie Harry, lead singer of Blondie, has been in over 55 movies and TV shows, perhaps she stole your head away in a movie called “Copland”? Which Sylvester Stallone gained 55 pounds for. And took it all the way to the bank.

[sound of an airplane]

Bob Dylan: It get awful hot here in the summertime, thank goodness, we can open the windows in the Abernathy Building. The only problem is, you can hear the planes taking off from Sabudio International Airport. I apologize for the noise. But it is awful convenient when I wanna get out of town in a hurry.

Bob Dylan: Next up: Little Milton with Oliver Sain's Orchestra. He was a blues guy, who have later had a bunch of solo hits also. He started out on the “Sun” label with Sam Phillips, moved to (...) St. Louis, and was on the “Bobbin” record label. He was kind of talent scout too: he was the first guy that signed Albert King and Fontella Bass. Couple of his big hits were “We're Gonna Make It,” “If Walls Could Talk,” and the unforgettable “Grits Ain't Groceries.” “I know the line is busy, but could you please try to reach her, one more time?” Little Milton, “Long Distance Operator.”

[Little Milton with Oliver Sain's Orchestra – “Long Distance Operator”]

Bob Dylan: He was called Little Milton, but he was 6 foot 2. I met him once on road, he was hearing them thick-and-thin silk socks. Inside one on them was a roll of hundred dollar bills, and on his other ankle was a holster. The man obviously knew how to live on the road.

Bob Dylan: Now we turn to the email part of our show. Tonight’s email is from Don Foster(?), from Silver Lake, California. And he wants to know about western swing legend Hank Penny. Thanks for asking, Don! Hank Penny never achieved the type of success, (as) his fellow bandleaders Bob Wills and Spade Cooley achieved. But then again, he never killed his wife, like Spade Cooley did. Hank was born in 19 and 18, in Birmingham, Alabama. His father was a coalminer, who inspired Hank with his skills as a guitarist, a poet, and a magician. By the age of 15 Hank Penny was performing at local radio, and we’re still playing him, on Theme Time Radio [Hank Penny – “Hold the Phone” starts playing] Hour.

[Hank Penny – “Hold the Phone”]

Bob Dylan: “Hold the phone, I’ll tell you my story, a bungalow for two? Oh, lucky me!” Hank Penny.

Bob Dylan: I was over Home Depot, had to get some wood. Who’d I ran into? That’s right, Gina Gershon! Turns out, she listens to the radio show. I told her about this week’s subject, and we talked about the whole lot of things. Some of them I can share with you.

[Gina Gershon: I don’t know if this counts as a telephone song, but I remember hearing this mambo song with this telephone call right in the middle of it. I think it was by this woman named Graciela. I don’t remember what they were talking about, but I remember I really liked the way it sounded. And I would really love it if you could play it for me, Bob.]

Bob Dylan: Well thanks, Gina. Salute!

[Graciela with Machito Orchestra – “La Bochinchera”]

[David Hidalgo: Soy David Hidalgo de Los Lobos estan escuchando Theme Time Radio Hour con Bob Dylan.]

[Aaron Neville – “Wrong Number Again” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Nobody sings a sad song like Aaron Neville. “Every time the telephone rings I hold my breath; I’m hoping it’s you, I’m scared to death; Let it be you. A voice says ‘Hello, wrong number, I’m sorry, goodbye’; I pity the fool, who loves you so; If you found someone new, don’t let me know. ‘Can I speak to Ben?’ a voice says on the other end. ‘Sorry, wrong number again.”

[Aaron Neville – “Wrong Number Again”]

Bob Dylan: The distinctive voice of Aaron Neville. A lot of people think we sing the same.

[Hellzapoppin’ (1941) excerpt:
“Telephone for Mr. Olsen”
“Hello? Who? The chamber mate?
Olsen: “Yeah.”
Johnson: “That’s bad, that’s good, that’s good, that’s bad, that’s good.”
Olsen: “Hey.”
Johnson: “That’s good.”
Olsen: “Hey!”
Johnson: “That’s bad.”
Olsen: “Hey what are you doing?”
Johnson: “What?”
Olsen: “What are you doing?!”
Johnson: “I’m helping her sort a box of strawberries.“]

Bob Dylan: “The Telephone is Ringing,” Pee Wee Crayton on “Vee-Jay Records.” Pee Wee’s from Texas. His real name is Connie Crayton. He moved to Los Angeles where he made most of his records. His biggest hit was called “Blues After Hours.” Other hits he had, included “Texas Hop,” and “Poppa Stoppa,” named after the famous rhythm and blues disc jockey. Though he was influenced by T-Bone Walker, he wasn’t only an imitator; he was an exciting live performer. This is him singing about the telephone too. “Telephone is ringing, and my baby’s on the line. I’m afraid to answer, because I know what’s on her mind.”

[Pee Wee Crayton – “The Telephone is Ringing”]

Bob Dylan: “The Telephone is Ringing,” Pee Wee Crayton. People say, he took all his money, and opened up a miniature golf course in Fresno. Crayton’s Pitching Pot.

[“A step by step we move toward realization of Bell’s early dream, his dream of a day when anyone anywhere can talk clearly and at a moment’s notice with anyone anywhere else.”]

[Please hung up and try your call again. This is a recording.]

[Natacha Snitkine – “Le Jeu Du Téléphone” starts playing in the backdround]

Bob Dylan: Out free minutes are up here, on Theme Time Radio Hour, dreams, schemes, and themes. (But) If you excuse me I'ma go make a few phone calls. See you next week.

[“Top Cat (underscore)”]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. Studio engineer: Tex Carbone. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Water.”

Bob Dylan (on the phone): Ahoy-hoy!


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PostPosted: Thu September 30th, 2010, 22:04 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
"Pitch and putt" not "pitching pot" ))
you know, I'm well aware of incredible amount of typos and other mistakes I'm making, it's only when I'm starting to translate, it all becomes clear. I'm just saying that so you wouldn't think that I'm that clueless... What I am usually absolutely clueless about, is that bed music.


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PostPosted: Sun October 3rd, 2010, 02:16 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Here's we've got two unknown bed songs. First one - before Tommy Johnson's “Cool Drink of Water Blues.” Second one - before Myra Taylor's “Still Blue Water.” I hope somebody knows at least one of them.


23 Water



[Danny Kaye – “Mommy, Give Me a Drink of Water” in the background]

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s night time in the Big City. A night watchman rinses out his thermos. Clouds cover the top of the Abernathy building.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host, Bob Dylan.

[Ramsey Lewis – “Wade in the Water” in the background]

Bob Dylan: In the background, The Ramsey Lewis Trio, performing their hit “Wade in the Water.” (That’s) should be all the clue you need that we’re gonna talk about that thing that covers 75% of the Earth surface. I mean, water. H20, “Crystal Geiser,” “Poland Spring,” and my favorite – tap. Of course, that’s all water under the bridge. 3% of all the water on the planet is fresh water, only 1% of the Earth’s water is available for drinking; the other two percent is currently frozen. But 100% of our music today is going to be about that clear liquid.

[Ramsey Lewis – “Wade in the Water” stops [playing in the background]

[sound of a sea wave]

Bob Dylan: Let’s turn on the faucet, and pour ourselves a glass of cool clear water. Leonard Slye was born in Cincinnati. He came out to California in the spring of 19 and 31. He entered armature singing contest, (and then) got an invitation to join a group called The Rocky Mountaineers. He played guitar, (singing?) yodel with the group, and before long, they wanted an additional singer so they could extend their range. A man who answered the add was Bob Nolan. In 19 and 33, Slye convinced Nolan to start a new group, which eventually became The Sons of The Pioneers. After he got a part in a film, to replace a suspended Gene Autry, (then) Slye eventually became Roy Rogers – a singing cowboy. Le left The Sons of the Pioneers, but they continued to have a lot of hits, thanks to Bob Nolan’s great songwriting. Like this example. [pouring water] Here’s Bob Nolan and The Sons of the Pioneers, singing one of the most mysterious songs ever written. About face the barren waste without the taste of water, cool clear water.

[The Sons of the Pioneers – “Cool Water”]

Bob Dylan: That was Sons of the Pioneers, singing “Cool Water,” here on Theme Time Radio Hour. Thomas Fuller was a British scholar, a preacher, and a doctor. He’s, perhaps, best remembered for what he said in 17 and 32: “We never know the worth of water till the well is dry.” In 19 and 61 William Bell too this words and added melody.

[William Bell – “You Don't Miss Your Water” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: He recorded it for the “Stax” record label. Here’s the great William Bell, “You Don't Miss Your Water.”

[William Bell – “You Don't Miss Your Water”]

Bob Dylan: That was William Bell. He (got his start back) in Rufus Thomas, and in 1957 recorded his first side, as a member of The Del Rios. He was a really good singer, and a great songwriter, he wrote the Albert King classic “Born under a Bad Sign.” Which we’ll probably hear on our “Halloween” show.

[Casablanca (1942) excerpt:
Captain Renault: What in heaven's name brought you to Casablanca?
Rick: My health. I came to Casablanca for the waters.
Captain Renault: The waters? What waters? We're in the desert.
Rick: I was misinformed.
Captain Renault: Huh!]

Bob Dylan: Here’s the fantastic Charlie Patton (testing the waters). This is about the Great Mississippi flood in 19 and 27, “High Water Everywhere, Part 1.” It's called “Part 1,” because back in the days of 78's if you had a song longer than three minutes you had to split it up on side one and side two, because the records only were three minutes long. So you only did a long song when you had something important to say, like this song about the most destructive river flood in United States history. The flood also inspired songs by Bessie Smith, Kansas Joe McCoy, Memphis Minnie, and Randy Newman. We’ll be playing Randy’s song a little bit later, but right now, here’s Charlie Patton, “High Water Everywhere, Part 1.”

[Charlie Patton – “High Water Everywhere, Part 1”]

Bob Dylan: Charlie Patton, “High Water Everywhere, Part 1,” how backwater rose at Sumner, and drove poor Charlie down the line. You hear a lot of scratch and hiss [sound of scratch and hiss] on his records, they were so popular, they were played to death, and the master recordings, were sold for scrap. Some of them even used to line chicken coops, and unfortunately, we (might?) never know what Charlie Patton really sounded like. [sound of scratch and hiss stops]

[sound of a sea wave, seagulls in the background ]

Bob Dylan: This is from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner:
Day after day, day after day,
We stuck, nor breath nor motion;
As idle as a painted ship
Upon a painted ocean.
Water, water, everywhere,
And all the boards did shrink;
Water, water, everywhere,
Nor any drop to drink.
That wouldn’t make Effie Smith happy.

[Effie Smith – “Water, Water” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: She loves water, no jab(?), whiskey or beer, she wants something cool and clear.

[Effie Smith – “Water, Water”]

Bob Dylan: That was Effie Smith and The Squires, with “Water, Water.” Also in The Squires were: Don "Sugarcane" Harris, and Dewey Terry – better known as “Don and Dewey.”

[The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970) excerpt:
In all the long, back-breaking, kidney-shaking, bladder-busting
miles from here to Lizard, there's not one spot of wet relief for man nor beast. No, sir! Climbed up on my hind feet and walked straight to water. W-A-T-L-E.]

[Booker T & The MG's – “You Left the Water Running” playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: Next up on Theme Time Radio Hour on of the great soul singers out of Memphis, James Carr, was the son of a minister and performed with several area gospel groups, including The Harmony Echoes, in 19 and 64 he signed with “Goldwax.” His 19 and 66 debut "You've Got My Mind Messed Up" is considered a classic. James Carr signed with the late Phil Walden to be his manager, but he was unable to deal with the stress of Terry(?). In 19 and 79 he apparently took too many antidepressants and stood motionless on stage in Tokyo. He spent much of the 80’s barely conscious of the world. This is one of his best, “Pouring Water on a Drowning Man.”

[James Carr – “Pouring Water on a Drowning Man”]

Bob Dylan: That was James Carr, being left out in the cold with tears in his eyes, drowning. We heard about cool clear water before. We heard about cool, clear water before, but the water Porter Wagoner sings about is colder and darker. Porter’s first band The Blue Ridge Boys performed on radio station KWPM from a butcher shop, where Porter cut meat. I wonder, whether that’s why he got his name Porter – from porterhouse steak. I guess he could have easily gone higher, and be known as Ground Chuck Wagoner. Who knows? But here he is with his backing band “The Wagonmasters,” with a song that reached number 10 on the country charts in 19 and 66, and can be heard on the album “I'm Day Dreamin' Tonight.”

[Porter Wagoner – “Cold Dark Water” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Porter Wagoner being plunged into the cold dark waters below, hoping somebody’s conscience hurts.

[Porter Wagoner – “Cold Dark Water”]

Bob Dylan: That of course was Porter Wagoner, on this waterlog edition of Theme Time Radio Hour – themes, streams and schemes.

[sea radar sound effect in the background]

Bob Dylan: The deep ocean waters are black as night. Without sunlight the bottom of the sea has no living plants, the only living creatures that can exist are select worms, sea cucumbers, and crustaceans, such as vent crabs, that dwell near hydrothermal openings. On the other hand, A giraffe can go a very long time without water. But he wants to see a menu right away. Isn’t nature amazing?

[The Cats and the Fiddle – “I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Alright, we got The Cats and the Fiddle coming up. On the “Bluebird” record label. They were founded by Austin Powell, who played guitar and sung, he’s joined by Jimmy Henderson, who played the tiple, which is a smaller guitar, Chuck Barksdale is on the bass, and Ernie Price plays guitar and tiple. They had the same basic style as the Mills Brothers, but they were a little rougher. Here’s a song they singing about dollar going from hand to hand, and a woman going from man to man, but, The Cats and the Fiddle would rather drink muddy water.

[The Cats and the Fiddle – “I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water”]

Bob Dylan: That was The Cats and the Fiddle, singing, “I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water.” The song was also recorded under the name “Blues Mixture” by Stick McGhee, on the b-side of “Drinkin' Wine, Spo-Dee-O-Dee.” If you got muddy water, here are some of the major processes for purifying it: you can boil it, carbon filter it, distil it, or use reverse osmosis by forcing it through semipermeable membran, which is my favorite method. And remember, muddy waters cannot quench love. Neither can the floods drown it.

Bob Dylan: Let’s return to the Great Mississippi Flood of 19 and 27. The flood that helped Huey Long be elected Louisiana Governor in 1928. This flood also affected Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

[Randy Newman – “Louisiana 1927” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Arkansas (was) the hardest hit, but Louisiana inspired one of the greatest songs written by Randy Newman. From his album “Good Old Boys” in 19 and 74, “Louisiana 19 and 27.”

[Randy Newman – “Louisiana 1927”]

Bob Dylan: That was Randy Newman, singing about President Coolidge coming down in a railroad train, with a little fat man with a note-pad in his hand. Randy won a “Best song” Oscar for his song in “Monster(s) Inc.” Congratulations Randy!

[Chinatown (1974) excerpt:
CROSS: There'll be ten million to build an aqueduct and reservoir. I'm doing it.

GITTES: Gonna be a lot of irate citizens when they find out that they're paying for water they're not gonna get.

CROSS: Oh that's all taken care of. See, Mr. Gittes. Either you bring the water to L.A. -- or you bring L.A. to the water.]

[unknown song starts playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: Along with Son House and Charley Patton, no one was more important to the development of Delta Blues than Tommy Johnson. And long before the stories about Robert Johnson selling his soul at the crossroads, those same stories were told about Tommy Johnson. His live performances where he would play guitar behind his neck, while hollering the blues at full volume, were legendary. Unfortunately, his addiction to alcohol was so pronounced that he was often seen drinking sterno and even shoe polish strained through white bread when whiskey wasn't available. “Cool Drink of Water Blues” by Tommy Jonson.

[Tommy Johnson – “Cool Drink of Water Blues”]

Bob Dylan: That was Tommy Johnson, “Cool Drink of Water Blues.” [Howlin' Wolf – “I Asked For Water (She Gave Me Gasoline)” starts playing in the background] Tommy only recorded until 19 and 30, but he was still performing as late as 19 and 56, when he suffered a fatal heart attack. Seems a shame we never got to hear some of them later performances. “Cool Drink of Water Blues” was (amped?) up in the 50’s, and became one of the great Chicago blues tracks, when it was recorded by one of his biggest admirers, Howlin’ Wolf, under the name “I asked for Water (She Brought Me Gasoline).”

[Howlin' Wolf – “I Asked For Water (She Gave Me Gasoline)”]

Bob Dylan: Holy Molly, that’s good! Howlin’ Wolf, “I asked for Water (She Brought Me Gasoline)”

Bob Dylan: Well, first of all, I wanna thank you for all your emails, it’s good to know, you’re all listening. I received one this week, from Dr. Ronald Sue, from Flint, Michigan. He writes: “Dear, sir, I enjoyed hearing about The Sir Douglas Quintet, and how they were really from Texas, and not England. But it made me think of another question: Were the The Standells, of “Dirty Water” fame, really from Boston?” Well, thanks for your email, Ron, and you really don’t have to be so formal, but as a matter of fact, The Standells weren’t from Boston at all. They were from Los Angeles, California. The drummer and singer Dick Dodd had been a musketeer on television, and organist Larry Tamblyn was the brother of noted film actor Russ Tamblyn, so don’t be deceived along with all their lovers, (foggers) and thieves.

[The Standells – “Dirty Water” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s The Standells, “Dirty Water.”

[The Standells – “Dirty Water”]

Bob Dylan: They’re not from Boston, it’s not their home, it’s not their number one place, The Standells, “Dirty Water.” I love that dirty water! Where can I get some?

Bob Dylan: Next up we’re gonna test the waters and travel to Mississippi, and visit with The Five Blind Boys. Archie Brownlee sings lead, along with Joseph Ford, Lawrence Abrams, Lloyd Woodard, and Melvin Henderson. They were students at the Piney Wood School, near Jackson, Mississippi, and began as The Cotton Blossom Singers. They used that name for singing popular songs, and the Jackson Harmoneers for gospel. But whey went and join Don Robey’s “Peackock” label, were of course the smart money was, and they became The Five Blind Boys, and recoded great songs like this, “Jesus Gave Me Water.”

[The Five Blind Boys of Mississippi – “Jesus Gave Me Water”]

Bob Dylan: “Jesus Gave Me Water.” Thank you, Jesus. That was The Five Blind Boys of Mississippi, and for those of you, who wanna hear more of the story, listen to this: John, chapter 4, verses 3 through 15.

[“ Jesus therefore, being wearied from His journey, sat thus by the well. A woman of Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to her: "Whoever drinks of this water will thirst again, but whoever drinks of the water that I shall give him will never thirst. But the water that I shall give him will become in him a fountain of water springing up into everlasting life.”]

[water sound effect]

[Lonnie Johnson and Eddie Lang – “Have to Change Keys” in the backgrpund]

Bob Dylan: Lonnie Johnson is coming up next, he’s gonna tell us all about the “Backwater Blues.” Lonnie’s a real interesting character. He recorded solo blues numbers, he also recorded jazz guitar, as early as 19 and 27, with Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five, and Duke Ellington’s Jungle Band. He had some hit records like "He's a Jelly Roll Baker" and a beautiful ballad “Tomorrow Night.” But time passes on, and even as great a talent as Lonnie Johnson can be forgotten. By the late 50’s he was toiling as a hotel janitor when he was rediscovered and had a major comeback on the folk blues festival trail. Here’s Lonnie Johnson and Bessie Smith – “Backwater Blues.”

[Lonnie Johnson – “Backwater Blues”]

Bob Dylan: That was Lonnie Johnson, and the “Backwater Blues.” In 19 and 69 Lonnie was hit by a car, and died a year later.

[another unknown music playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Myra Taylor with Jimmy Keith's Orchestra. Myra Taylor was one of the last authentic swing singers in the Kansas City tradition. She was the featured vocalist with Clarence Love, Roy Eldridge, Stuff Smith and Harlan Leonard. She worked with Eubie Blake during World War II, and wrote such great songs as “The Spider and The Fly”/”Take It Easy Greasy,” “I'm In My Sins This Morning,” and this one.

[Myra Taylor with Jimmy Keith's Orchestra – “Still Blue Water” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: I wanna grave where no evil can find me, Still Blue Water. Myra Taylor with Jimmy Keith's Orchestra.

[Myra Taylor with Jimmy Keith's Orchestra – “Still Blue Water”]

Bob Dylan: That was Myra Taylor, talking about going down to Davy Jones' Locker, and having a burial at sea.

[“Taps” in the background]

Bob Dylan: She’s in good company, here are some other folks who had burials at sea: Steve McQueen, Ingrid Bergman, Dennis Wilson, Rock Hudson, Vincent Price, Robert Mitchum, John F. Kennedy, and Jerry Garcia.

[splash of water]

Bob Dylan: Well, we got time for about one more glass of water. [pouring water] This one is served iced, by Glenn Barber, from Hollis, Oklahoma. At the age of 6 he got in trouble for touching a neighbors guitar.

[“Spinal Tap” excerpt:
“Don’t touch it! It can’t be played!”]

Bob Dylan: His dad saw how much he loved it and worked day and night so that he could buy him a 3 dollar and 50 cent guitar. Turns out it was a good investment. That guitar became his best friend and he made some rocking music on it. Like this song, “Ice Water.” Glenn Barber.

[Glenn Barber – “Ice Water”]

Bob Dylan: That was Glenn Barber, and “Ice Watwe,” on Theme Time Radio Hour. Have an onion that will make you ice water(?).

[Ramblin' Jack Elliot – “Grand Coulee Dam” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Where does the time go? We got to go again, but we’ll be back next week with more dreams themes and schemes. But in the meantime, remember – sweat, tears or the sea, salt water’s the cure for everything. I'll see you next week, come hell or high water, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[“Top Cat (underscore)”]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. Studio engineer: Tex Carbone. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Time.”

Bob Dylan: Remember, blood is thicker than water, but I wouldn’t wanna drink it.


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PostPosted: Tue October 5th, 2010, 03:54 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 28th, 2008, 19:54 GMT
Posts: 140
Viktor:

The bed music after Randy Newman is Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grapelli's "La Mer" from '49. The bed before Myra Taylor is guitarist Tal Farlow playing "How Deep is the Ocean?"


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