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PostPosted: Fri March 5th, 2010, 15:17 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Hi, everybody!
I'm a non-English speaking person (from Ukraine) who happen to love Bob Dylan and particularly his radio show.
Long story short - I've decided to translate and possibly launch a Ukrainian podcast of Mr. Dylan's show - I've already finisher the very first episode, but with the rest I'm having problems. The reason is - there was a transcript of the first episode on dreamtimepodcast.com, so I simply made a translation from already transcribed text. - when it came to the second episode, the transcript was nowhere to find, so I had to made it myself. As you can probably understand, Mr. Dylan speech could be tough to decipher - I'm sure even for native English speakers, sometimes! So, imagine how it is like to do for some Ukrainian guy, who ain't no English major)...
So I'm asking you to take a look at "Mother" episode's transcription and, well, fill in the blanks.
I'm going to post it right here - hope it doesn't interfere with any of this forums regulations. If there will be any helpful reaction, maybe we'll figure some other scheme for dealing with next episodes.
And, by the way, I hope it may be helpful not only for me (or any international fan of Bob Dylan), but for lots of fans as well - after all transcription of favorite show isn't the least useful thing.
So, here we go:...

Episode 2, "Mother."

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. The moon goes behind a cloud. A truck drops off tomorrow’s newspapers.
Ellen Barkin: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Happy Mother’s Day everybody! It’s time for Theme Time Radio Hour. Gonna pay tribute to that baneful burst we’re all spring from – mother dearest. M’s for the many things she gave me. O’s for the other things she gave me. T’s for the things she gave me. H’s for her things which she gave me. E’s for everything she gave me. R’s for the rest of the things she gave me. Let’s talk about mothers. A mother is the only person on earth who can divide her love among ten children, and each child still have all her love. Let’s celebrate mothers on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: This is Julia Lee, one of those singer piano players. Lot of double entendres [...] very popular in Kansas City. Julia Lee and Her Boy Friends playing for the [cuitical] mass. She played with her brother’s George E. Lee’s Orchestra [“Electrical Charged”]. [???] went to California, had some big hits, including this one on the Capitol label —Mama don’t allow no alto playing– trumpet playing–trombone playing–althorn playing. “Mama Don’t Allow,” Julia Lee.

[Julia Lee – “Mama Don’t Allow”]

Bob Dylan: Red Norvo on the xylophone, Benny Carter on alto, Vick Dickinson on trombone – “Mama Don’t Allow,” Julia Lee.

Bob Dylan: Theme Time Radio Hour. Dreams, schemes and themes.

Bob Dylan: Tommy Duncan, alternative medicine. His real name was Thomas Elmer Duncan, born on January 11th, 19and11, in Whitney, Texas full of – full of iodine and iron. He won an audition against 66 other singers to join Bob Wills’ Light Crust Doughtboys – who later became the Texas Playboys. Tommy Duncan left the band in 1948, recorded a number of songs, including "Gambling Polka Dot Blues," “Six, Sober, and Sorry,” and “There’s Not a Cow in Texas” – a lot of fuzzy logic there. But in honor of Mother’s Day here’s the song. “Mommyo Ain’t Around. Daddyo doing his thing up right. Daddyo can’t find his mama.” “Daddy Loves Mammyo,” Tommy Duncan. All hydrogen and sulfate.

[Tommy Duncan – “Daddy Loves Mammyo”]

Bob Dylan: No fatty acid in that. “Daddy Loves Mammyo,” Tommy Duncan – on Theme Time Radio Hour. Themes, dreams, schemes.

Bob Dylan: “Mama Din’t Lie,” Jan Bradley. Story of a girl betrayed by her boyfriend, and her mother’s moaning not to be so fast. “She will tell you about the boys making eyes at her again, thinking she’ll be caught by the wink of an eye.” Oh no. Jan Bradley, “Mama Din’t Lie.”

[Jan Bradley – “Mama Didn’t Lie”]

Bob Dylan: “Mama Didn’t Lie,” Jan Bradley. A many-fabled song by a honey-toned crooner. Produced by Curtis Mayfield.
[Jingle: “I’d like to wish my mommy a happy Mother’s Day.” “And I’d like to wish a wonderful mom the best in ev’ry way.” “And we’d like to say to ev’ry mother, wherever you are today, we’re sincerely wishing you a happy Mother’s Day!”]
Bob Dylan: Buck. Buck Owens. Come out of Sherman, Texas. Made his way to Bakersfield, California. In the 1960’s The Beatles recorded a song (of) Buck’s called “Act Naturally.” In those years Buck had 39 chart hits, 19 of them at number one. Hey, let’s not forget Hee Haw – never missed it. I still remember some of them jokes from Hee Haw: “My mother-in-law’s very neat – puts paper under the cuckoo clock.” Here’s Buck Owens and the Buckaroos, featuring Dandy Don Rich. Here's Buck singing about hymns that warm your heart in the sweet by-and-by, that chapel in the sky. “I’ll Go to Church Again with Mama,” Buck Owens and his Buckaroos on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Buck Owens and the Buckaroos – “I’ll Go to Church Again with Mama”]

Bob Dylan: “I’ll go to church with mama again, in the sweet by-and-by, in that chapel in the sky.” What can you say about Buck Owens and the Buckaroos? A rocket power playing of a band.

Bob Dylan: In the United States there’s about 92.5 million mothers.

Bob Dylan: Randy Newman, an exhilarated performer. “Mama Told Me Not to Come” a big hit for Three Dog Night. Randy is known as the songwriter mainly an eclectic one but, never the less, one. Later he gained some authority as a performer. Eventually, even winning some Academy Awards. Always obstinately self-willed, and refusing to concur conform, or submit to the popular trends. “Mama Told Me Not to Come,” Randy Newman.

[Randy Newman – “Mama Told Me Not to Come”]

Bob Dylan: Long suffering, Randy Newman. “Crazy places, the wildest party, open the window, let him catch his breath, he’s almost choking on the stale perfume, and cigarettes too.” “Mama Told Me Not to Come,” Randy Newman.

Time: 17:26

Bob Dylan: Some songs you don’t have to talk about, they just say it all.

[Bobby Peterson Quintet – “Mama Get the Hammer”]

Bob Dylan: "Mama get the hammer, there's a fly on baby's head." Bobby Peterson, a pianist and vocalist from Chester, Pennsylvania. Recorded for the “V-Tone” label, keenly alive, always brisk.

[Charlie Sheen promo: “This is Charlie Sheen and you’re listening to Theme Time Radio Hour with Bob Dylan.” ]

Bob Dylan: J.B. Lenoir, “Mama Talk to Your Daughter.” He recorded for all the big Chicago labels: “Chess,” “JOB,” “Parrot,” and “Checker.” Known for wearing a zebra skin with tails – a lot of cross-post in there. High-pitched voice like in cyberspace. Played along with SunnyLand Slim, J.T. Brown on the saxophone, and Alfred Wallace on the drums. He also recorded a great song called “Don’t Touch My Head.” Here he is, from the digital city, J.B. Lenoir.

[J.B. Lenoir – “Mama Talk to Your Daughter”]

Bob Dylan: Speaking of mamas: I caught up with Penn Jillette of Penn and Teller the other day, an he told me what it’s like to be a mama’s boy.

[Penn Jillette: There’s two ways that mama’s boys turn out. The one way is kind of the, um, the accepted Namby Pamby way, the wimpy way. But there’s another kind of mama’s boy, who had such complete unconditional love from his mother and father that he had the feeling that he was twelve feel tall and bulletproof – and that’s what my mom, um, did for me.

Penn Jillette: My favourite story about my mom – about unconditional love – is when, um, Penn and Teller opened on off-Broadway. There was the opening, there’s this tradition in theater – that you wait up all night at a party until the New York Times comes out at 3 or 4 a.m., and that... The review was read aloud, and that decided whether your show was successful of not. So we’ve waited up... My mother and father were at the, um, party, and they were sitting with our producer. And they’ve read the review from the New York Times aloud, and it was really unbelievable money review. And, um, the next day, um, I had breakfast with my mom – my day and my mom said, they’ve read that review from the New York Times, “And you producer turned to me and said, “Doesn’t that make you proud?” And it made me so sad and uncomfortable because I don’t need the New York Times to be proud of my son! I was proud of you from the instant you were born!”]

[Earl King – “A Mother's Love”]

Bob Dylan: Earl King. From the Crescent City, New Orleans. His real name was Earl Johnson. “Specialty Records” boss Art Rupe wanted to name him King Earl but the typesetter made a mistake and reversed the name. “A Mother’s Love,” Earl King.

Bob Dylan: “Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean,” Ruth Brown. She’s gonna tell you about the meanest man she’s ever seen. “Can’t be trusted, and she’s so disgusted.” “Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean,” Ruth Brown.

Bob Dylan: They called Atlantic Records the House That Ruth Built, and they weren't talking about Babe Ruth or garbanzo beans. Ruth Brown had more hits on Atlantic Records than anybody else in the beginning, and she was no gang-banger. But even with all those hits, Ruth's star began to fade. She eventually had to take a 9-to-5 job. But in recent years she's been rediscovered, appearing on Broadway in "Black and Blue," where she won a Tony.

[Excerpt from Carl Smith – “Let Old Mother Nature Have Her Way”]

Time: 29:37

Bob Dylan: “Let Mother Nature Have Her Way,” Carl Smith. Carl was married to June Carter before Johnny Cash was, and after he divorced June he married another country singer named Goldie Hill. This is song about doing all the thing that lovers do. “Ain’t no use to stay so far away.” Carl Smith singing a song about Mother Nature, the goddess of the harvest, whose name originally meant “Earth Mother.” She wreaked revenge upon the earth by refusing to provide any crops, so that the entire human race would have perished of cruel, biting hunger if the great god Zeus had not been concerned. I hope your mother's not that vengeful. Here’s Carl Smith, “Let Mother Nature Have Her Way”.

[Carl Smith – “Let Mother Nature Have Her Way”]

[Memphis Slim – “Mother Earth” playing in the background all the way through the next sequence]

Bob Dylan: “Mother Earth,” Memphis Slim. Born in Memphis in 1915, passed away in Paris in 1988. A big ...... in the middle of his hair. He’s a great singer, piano player and songwriter. Featuring Matt Guitar Murphy on guitar. Did the original version of "Every Day I Have the Blues." This is a song about Memphis Slim not carrying about how great you are, what you worth. In the end you got to go back to Mother Earth. Mother Earth is laying for you. Memphis Slim.

[Memphis Slim – “Mother Earth”]

Bob Dylan: “Mother Earth,” Memphis Slim. You can’t hide ... Mother Earth.

Bob Dylan: Now we’re gonna read an e-mail. Today's e-mail comes from John Rudolph of Cranston, Rhode Island. He writes, "Dear Bob: I've got a hammerhead of a mother-in-law, an ugly, evil-lookin' old woman, so pitiful. She's careworn, drawn and pinched — gaunt and lank. I bought her a new chair, but she won't let me plug it in. She belittles me, depreciates me, disparages me. She downgrades me, berates me, censures me and condemns me, libels me and raps me, dismisses me and rejects me. Could you please play a song for her?" Well, thanks for the letter, John. Your wish is our command. Here’s Ernie K-Doe.

[Ernie K. Doe – “Mother-in-Law”]

Bob Dylan: Number one rhythm-and-blues hit from 1961, Ernie K. Doe “Mother-in-Law.” Ernie K. Doe has got a mother-in-law that won’t leave him alone, if she did they’d have a happy home. Satan should be her name – to Ernie K. Doe they’re about the same.

Bob Dylan: Here's a couple of mother-in-law jokes, couple of slow burners: "I just came back from a pleasure trip. Took my mother-in-law to the airport." "What do you do if you miss your mother-in-law? Reload. Try again." Here's one by Little Junior Parker: "Mother-in-Law Blues." I don't know if you need both Little and Junior. His real name was Herman Parker Jr. I guess I'd call myself Little Junior Parker too. He was a singer and a harmonica player. He got started on Sun Records with his group the Blue Flames. He recorded the original version of "Mystery Train." Moved over to Duke Records where the ... was . Don Robey was the head of that label. He claimed to have written “Mother-in-Law Blues.” Never the less, here he is, singing about his mother-in-law. Junior Parker.

[Little Junior Parker – “Mother-in-Law Blues”]

Bob Dylan: “Mother-in-Law Blues,” Little Junior Parker.

Time: 43:22

Bob Dylan: Merle Haggard, “Mama Tried.” First thing Merl remembers is the whistle-blowing like so many of us are. Freight train leaving town. The rebel child from family, meek and mild. All his Sunday Learning, towards the bed he keeps on turning. Spent his entire youth in juvenile detention homes. When Johnny Cash came to San Quentin, he inspired Merle to get serious about music. He was encouraged by Cash, made him realize he needed to turn his life around – no more punk and plaster. In 1972 Governor Ronald Reagan gave him a full pardon, pulling him right out of the bag. “Mama Tried,” Merle Haggard – on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Merle Haggard – “Mama Tried”]

Bob Dylan: “Mama Tried,” Merle Haggard. One of the most influential songwriters since Hank Williams. Had plenty of sharp stuff, – along with Buck Owens – the king of the Bakersfield town, the shakeman.

Bob Dylan: Jimmy McCracklin, “Gonna Tell Your Mother.” Born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1921. His real name is James Walker, a professional boxer in the Midwest. He didn't get anywhere doing that, so he turned to music, playing piano and singing. His band was called Jimmy McCracklin and his Blues Blasters, featuring Lafayette Thomas on the guitar. This is from 1955. A strange weed indeed. Goona talk to you mother, gonna tell her how you’ve been treating me – Don’t do that, she might get mad.” Jimmy McCracklin.

[Jimmy McCracklin – “Gonna Tell Your Mother”]

Bob Dylan: Happy Mother’s Day – from Jimmy McCracklin.

Bob Dylan: Tell me a story, how you adore me, live in the shadows, see through the shadows, live in the shadows again. Tear at the shadows, hate in the shadows, love in you shadowy light. Have You Seen Your Mother Baby, Standing In The Shadow? I Have.

[Rolling Stones – “Have You Seen Your Mother Baby Standing In The Shadows”]

Bob Dylan: The Rolling Stones are gonna open up your eyes, they’re gonna try to freeze you in ice. Give all you sympathy to mine (man?). – That must be the King’s English, – yeah, the Rolling Stones.

Bob Dylan: “Mother” can be the nicest word on the world, and also start a few fights. The “dozens” in the street game, sometimes known as “cracking,” “ranking,” sparking,” or “snapping” – basically, this is trash talk – you insult each other, most often invoking the other person’s mother. You’re judged on the quality of your insults, and also – how well you keep your cool on being insulted. The term “the dozens” is believed to refer to the devaluing on the auctionblock of slaves who were past their prime. These slaves were often sold by the dozens. For an African-American to be sold as part of the dozens was the lowest insult possible.

Bob Dylan: This in Dirty Red talking about kicking “Mother Fuyer.” A tight mother fuyer. An evil mother fuyer. A bad, rotten mother fuyer. Burnt and smoking mother fuyer. He ain’t gonna tell you no lie. He’s gonna tell you about the monkey and the baboon, that will wait ye here with some on fills up his pants with. The other side on Mother’s Day on Theme Time Radio Hour. “Mother Fuyer,” Dirty Red.

[Ditry Red – “Mother Fuyer”]

Bob Dylan: Dirty Red, “Mother Fuyer.” A song recorded of which variations by many people – Memphis Minnie – other version, Kokomo Arnold, Speckled Red. In the same tradition as the dozens here’s LL Cool J. Don't call it a comeback, he been here for years, rocking his peers, putting them in fear, making tears rain down like a monsoon, explosions overpowerin', over the competition LL Cool J is towering. Here’s "Mama Say Knock You Out," so, I’m going to knock you out.

[LL Cool J – “Mama Said Knock You Out”]

Bob Dylan: “Mama Said Knock You Out,” LL Cool J — stands for Ladies Love Cool J.

Bob Dylan: That’s all the time we have this week on Theme Time Radio Hour. We’ll see you again next week, but in the meantime – go call you mothers.

Time: 60:01

[“Top Cat (Underscore”)]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Drink.”


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PostPosted: Fri March 5th, 2010, 15:36 GMT 
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I wanted to note that I've been corresponding with Viktor, and have occasionally provided him with insight on some of the Americanisms (like "geeee-rind") that Mr. D. employed. Unfortunately, I didn't have the time to help him out on "Mother" and suggested he crowd-source it here. Hope someone takes on the challenge.


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PostPosted: Sun March 7th, 2010, 06:10 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 5th, 2009, 13:56 GMT
Posts: 4
viktorhlon wrote:
...that baneful burst we’re all spring from...

...that bountiful breast we all spring from...

Quote:
Lot of double entendres [...] very popular in Kansas City.

...making her very popular in Kansas City.

Quote:
playing for the [cuitical] mass.

...the critical mass.

Quote:
[???] went to California, had some big hits...

Then she cut him loose and went to California...

Quote:
...althorn playing.

...xylophone playing.

Quote:
“Six, Sober, and Sorry,”

"Sick, Sober, and Sorry”

Quote:
a girl betrayed by her boyfriend, and her mother’s moaning not to be so fast. “She will tell you...

...a girl's betrayal by her boyfriend, and her mother’s warning not to be so fast. She'll tell you...

Quote:
A many-fabled song by a honey-toned crooner

A mini-fable sung by a honey-toned crooner.

Quote:
A rocket power playing of a band.

A rocket-powered plane of a band.

Quote:
In the United States there’s about 92.5 million mothers.

...82.5 million...

Quote:
Randy is known as the songwriter mainly an eclectic one but, never the less, one. Later he gained some authority as a performer...

...known as a songwriter mainly, an eclectic one, but never-the-less, one. Later he gained some notoriety...

Quote:
A big ...... in the middle of his hair.

A big tall man with one white streak in the middle of his hair.

Quote:
This is a song about Memphis Slim not carrying about how great you are...

...not caring...

Quote:
You can’t hide ... Mother Earth.

You can’t high-hat Mother Earth.

Quote:
Moved over to Duke Records where the ... was.

...where the smart money was.

Quote:
First thing Merle remembers is the whistle-blowing like so many of us are.

...like so many of us all.

Quote:
All his Sunday Learning, towards the bed he keeps on turning.

...to the bad he keeps on turning.

Quote:
...the king of the Bakersfield town...

...the Bakersfield Sound...

Quote:
He’s gonna tell you about the monkey and the baboon, that will wait ye here with some on fills up his pants with.

...then wait till you hear what someone fills up his pants with.


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PostPosted: Mon March 8th, 2010, 01:32 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Wow! Thank you SO MUCH, moogums!
You can't imagine how grateful I am!

Shall we now go 'Drinking?':)


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PostPosted: Fri March 12th, 2010, 00:08 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Okay, here's "Drinking." There are really tough spots towards the end.
"Baseball" and "Coffee" already transcribed, but I'll post them here later. "Drinking" appears to be the toughest one out of four.



“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s night time in the Big City. A Styrofoam coffee cup rolls across the street. Two sailors get out of a cab.

Ellen Barkin: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host, Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: It’s time for Theme Time Radio Hour. Dreams, schemes and themes. Sit back and enjoy yourself, pour yourself a tall cool, and listen while we discuss the world of liquid libation, booze, sauce, hooch, white lightning, fire water, hard stuff, pick me up, gin and juice, moonshine, canned heat.

Bob Dylan: We’re gonna start (out) with George Zimmerman and the Thrills doing “Ain't Got No Money to Pay for This Drink.” “I need it bad. My wife had a baby, took everything I had.” You know, all this talk is making me thirsty – Excuse me a minute.

[George Zimmerman and the Thrills – “Ain't Got No Money to Pay for This Drink”]

Bob Dylan: Saint George. George Zimmerman and the Thrills, “Ain’t Got No Money to Pay for This Drink.” I once had a friend who’ve said, “Liquor will get you through times with no money better than money will get you through time with no liquor.”

[The Lost Weekend clip?]

Bob Dylan: This song was written by Stick McGhee – the brother of Brownie McGhee. Stick was a guitar player, served in the army during the World War II, around that time he wrote this song about drinking wine. He used the phrase “Spo-Dee-O-Dee “ to replace a word that you hear a lot nowadays but back then you couldn’t use in on a record. I’ll give you a clue – half of the world is “mother.” It was a first big hit for Atlantic Records, everybody in the world covered it, including the Electric Flag, who had a guitarist by the name of Mike Bloomfield. And here they are with their version of "Drinkin' Wine, Spo-Dee-O-Dee" – “Wine, Wine, Wine.”

[The Electric Flag – “Wine, Wine, Wine”]

Bob Dylan: “Liquor and love don’t mix, leave the bottle or me behind. Don’t come home a-drinking with loving on your mind.” Loretta Lynn.

[Loretta Lynn – “Don’t Come Home a-Drinkin’”]

Bob Dylan: Loretta Lynn from Butcher Hollow – a small mining community in Kentucky. Sissy Spacek played her in the movie “Coal Miner's Daughter.” He younger sister is Crystal Gayle. You can catch het on RFD-TV where they show the ol’ Wilburn Brothers’ show that she was on. Loretta Lynn, “Don’t Come Home Drinkin’ with loving on you mind.”
Bob Dylan: Alcohol will kill anything that’s alive and preserve anything that’s dead. This is a song about lil’ boy, who’s singing about his daddy who used to work long hours and late ones. Than one day mama disappeared, so did daddy’s mind. I need a sac o’ candy like daddy needs his wine. Porter Wagoner, “Daddy and the Wine.”

[Porter Wagoner – “Daddy and the Wine”]

Bob Dylan: “Daddy and The Wine.” Porter Wagoner is known for his big bland pompadour and his Nudie suits.

Bob Dylan: Alright. This girl has got an interesting story. At 15 she stole her parents car and ran away from home. Spent her 18th birthday in a Kansas City jail. Finally made her way to Boston. Ended up opening a [...] restaurant called the Dixie Kitchen, but always was writing songs. And this one has become king of her signature song, called “I Drink.” This is Mary Gauthier.

[Mary Gauthier – “I Drink”]

Bob Dylan: “Fish swim, birds fly, lovers leave, by and by. Old man sit and think. I Drink.” Mary Gauthier.

Bob Dylan: Charles Aznavour is a French singer and songwriter. Been around since the 30’s – still going strong. This is one of the most devastating drinking songs of all time. Charles Aznavour, “I Drink.”

[Charles Aznavour – “I Drink”]

Bob Dylan: Charles Aznavour. Often described as the Frank Sinatra of France. He’s made more than a 100 records, has appeared in 60 movies, sings in 6 languages – French, English, Italian. He's written over a thousand songs – I only know about half of them.

[sound of pouring drink]

Time: 22:18

Bob Dylan: This is Jimmy Rogers joins the Muddy Waters band. He has recorded some fine ... on his own. Such as this one – about a man who drinks so much, he’s two thousand swallows ahead of Capistrano. Jimmy Rogers, “Sloppy Drunk.”
[Jimmy Rogers – “Sloppy Drunk”]

Bob Dylan: Ran into Jimmy Kimmel at Elmo’s Bar – listen to what he had to say.

[Jimmy Kimmel: Beer is... It’s not just a drink – to me it represents something, reminds me of being in college and high school and discovering getting drink and having a, um, fifteen pack of sh... in the trunk of my friend Tommy’s car and drinking it hot out of the can in a parking lot in Las Vegas somewhere. Something about beer equals good times to me. ]

[beer jingle, ad?]

Bob Dylan: Lonnie the Cat. Ike Turner had a band called Turner's Kings of Rhythm. He had about five or six vocalists that sang with him – some were with saxophone ... the piano player. And some of them just saying – like Lonnie the Cat – “I don’t even know his last name, I don’t know what the folks are thinking, I ain’t drunk, I’m just drinking.” Lonnie the Cat.

[Lonnie the Cat – “I Ain’t Drunk”]

Bob Dylan: Lonnie the Cat. He has read about evils of drinking, so he quit reading.

Bob Dylan: “It Ain’t Far to the Bar,” but it’s such a long way back. Johnny Tyler and his Riders of the Rio Grande. Western swing music: a mixture of country, cowboy, polka, and folk music, blended together with a jazzy swing, little bit of New Orleans jazz and delta blues. He had everything from a pedal steel player to a bunch a saxophones. And Johnny Tyler was one on the best players around – when he wasn’t too busy at a bar. “No use getting rough, I know you’ve said I had enough.” Johnny Tyler, “Ain’t Far to the Bar.”

[Johnny Tyler and his Riders of the Rio Grande – “It Ain't Far to the Bar”]

[James Bond clip]

Time: 32:35

Bob Dylan: Hank Junior. Randall. Rockin’ Randal, Bocephus. The song of the great Hank Willians. When he started out his mom put him on the road, singing nothing about his daddy’s songs. Had a band called The Cheatin' Hearts. Eventually have found his own voice, became one of the great singers in country music on his own. Singing the theme song to Monday night football – “Are you ready for some football?” Had the audacity to fell off the mountain and live to tell about it. “What’s on a bar? What’s on a movies? What’s on a tube? What’s on a woman’s mind? I don’t have a clue. What’s with this cell phone? What the hell is wrong with my car? I think I’m going here – check it out – see what’s on a bar.” Here’s Bocephus.

[Hank Williams, Jr. – “What's on the Bar”]

Bob Dylan: Hank Junior, “What’s on the Bar,” I hope it’s a drink. Because this is Radio Theme Time Hour, and our drinking show.

Bob Dylan: We’ve just got an e-mail from Lenore Pike from Cincinnati. What’s in the world my recipe is for Mint Julep? Alright, Lenore, get ready with your pencil now, here it is: First up you take 4 mint sprigs, 2 1/2 ounces of bourbon — I prefer three — a tablespoon of powdered sugar and a tablespoon of water. You put the mint leaves, powdered sugar and water in a Collins glass. You fill the glass with shaved or crushed ice, and then add bourbon. Top that off with more ice, and I like to garnish mine with a mint sprig. Serve it with a straw. Two or three of those and anything sounds good.
Bob Dylan: Lenore, we’re gonna make you extra happy – here are the Clovers with “One Mint Julep.”

[The Clovers – “One Mint Julep”]

Bob Dylan: One of the great vocal groups on Atlantic Records – The Clovers, “One Mint Julep.”

[an excerpt from The Andrews Sisters – “Rum and Coca Cola”]

Time: 40:32

Bob Dylan: Laverne, Maxine, and Patty – the Andrews Sisters. Their big hit “Rum and Coca Cola.” Everybody things that Maury Amsterdam wrote that song but actually it was written by a man named Rupert Grant, who was a calypso singer known as Lord Invader. He took a plagiarism case to the US court and he won, but everybody still thinks Maury Amsterdam wrote it. The Andrews Sisters, “Run and Coca Cola.”

[The Andrews Sisters – “Rum and Coca Cola”]

Bob Dylan: Let me give you my recipe for Rum and Coca Cola: Take a tall glass, put some ice in it, 2 fingers of Bombay rum, and bottle of Coca Cola - Shake it up well and go drink it in the sunshine!

[cocktail-making sound]

Bob Dylan: John Lee Hooker – doing a song originally done by Amos Milburn – “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer.” He was from Clarksdale , Mississippi, was born in 1917. One of those guys that recorded under a thousand different names, John Booker being one, Johnnie Lee, The Boogie Boy. John Lee – one of those guys that always sounds better without a band – 13 bars here, 11 bars there, 9 there – it doesn't matter to him. Nobody can do more with less than John Lee Hooker. A band's gotta hold on for dear life just to keep up.

[John Lee Hooker – “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer”]

Bob Dylan: “Mister bartender, come here! I want another drink, I want it now! I’m mellow, I’m knocked out.” John Lee Hooker, “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer.”

[Penn Jillette promo: “Hi! This is Penn Jillette of Penn and Teller and you’re listening to Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.”]

Bob Dylan: Charlie Walker was born in Texas. Got his start as the vocalist in The Cowboy Ramblers. He did a whole bunch of Honky Tonk Songs, including: “Close All the Honky Tonks,” “Honky Tonk Season,” and even a cover version of the Rolling Stones’ “Honky Tonk Woman.” After the hits were dyed up he moved to Las Vegas, he stayed there until having a comeback in 1986 with MC Hammer. Ha was a Freemason, and you can tell. Here are some other great Freemasons that come out of the Grand Ol’ Opry: Roy Acuff, Eddie Arnold, Grandpa Jones, Pee-Wee King, Little Jimmy Jenkins, Roy Clark, Charlie Louvin, and Grand Ol’ Opry band member Joel Edwards. They’ve all committed themselves to the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man by becoming Master Masons. Preach on my brothers! “Not long ago you held our baby’s bottle. Now you’re holding a bottle of a different kind.” Charlie Walker, “Who Will Buy The Wine.”

[Charlie Walker – “Who Will Buy The Wine”]

Bob Dylan: Charlie Walker, “Who Will Buy The Wine.” What wine? Cheap wine. There’s a lot of cheap wines: “Night Train,” “Mad Dog 20/20,” “Ripple,” and everybody’s favourite, “What’s the word? – “Thunderbird.” – What’s the price? – Thirty twice. – What’s the reaction? – Satisfaction. – What’s the flavor? – Ask your neighbor.

Bob Dylan: Betty Hall Jones. Who is she? I’ll tell you who she was. She was a piano player and singer. Wrote a lot of her own songs. Out of Topeka, Kansas. She’s got her start playing with Buss Boughton and Hattie Williams and then she moved to California and played with Roy Milton and his Solid Senders. Some words of caution: “If don’t want to recline in that box of pine, stay off of that wine.” Good advice from Betty Hall Jones.

[Betty Hall Jones – “Buddy Stay Off That Wine”]

Bob Dylan: “Buddy Stay Off That Wine.” “I could tell that (bad) boy wasn’t well. Gin and beer — that’s good, you can drink liquor aged in wood, but buddy stay off of that wine.” Betty Hell Jones.

Bob Dylan: We couldn’t do a show about drinking without hearing a story from Liam Clancy.

[Liam Clancy: First ANR man was Teo Macero. Teo Macero said “I’m an ANR man.” I said, “What does it mean?” He said, “Artist and Repertoire, and I have to fine your songs for you.” I said, “How can you fine our songs for us? They’re 200 years old, we learned them from old-timers in Ireland. I learned them from my mother. I learned them from Tommy Makem’s mother.” And he said, “Yeah, I’ve been wondering about that. So what are you going to do?” “Put up the microphones, we’ll sing, that’s our job.” Sat up to microphones, remember my brother Patty, he took a bottle of whiskey out of a brown paperbag, opened in up, told me – Tommy [...] his live, – but the rest of us have few drinks, and we sang. We just started blasting into songs. We turned on an album, we had it done within a few hours and – that’s recording session. Teo Macero walks in, get out of brown paperbag, unleashes the Jamieson and said, “Gentlemen, your ranger has arrived. (laughs)]

Bob Dylan: Clancy Brothers – Thom, Liam, Patty and their buddy Tommy Maken. They were born in ... Tipperary, Ireland. But they not became playing together until they came to United States in 1955 – where they’ve met Tommy Maken. They’ve always wore those Irish wool sweaters that their mother made. They made over 50 records got their big brake on the Ed Sullivan Show. They played for JFK at the White House. “Whiskey, you’re the devil. You’re my dalring. Drunk or sober, you're leading me astray.” The Clancy Brothers, “Whiskey, You’re the Devil.” ... tin whistle playing too.

[Clancy Brothers and Tommy Maken – “Whiskey, You're the Devil”]

Bob Dylan: ... man says we’ve got to go. I’m going next door to Elmo’s lounge, and have myself something cool to drink. Maybe a Screwdriver, White Russian, Gen and Tonic, or Sidecar, maybe all of them together. Maybe it’ll be a Grass Upper, or Whiskey Sour, Black Russian, or pina ... – I just don’t know. ... Tom Collins, Zombie – I’m getting high just thinking about it! See you next week.

Time: 59:15

[“Top Cat (Underscore”)]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Baseball.”


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PostPosted: Wed March 17th, 2010, 16:51 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Come on guys, at least take a listen to Liam Clancy's segment. Pleeease!


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PostPosted: Thu March 18th, 2010, 01:46 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 5th, 2009, 13:56 GMT
Posts: 4
Our first A&R man was Teo Macero. Teo Macero said, “I’m an A&R man.” I said, “What does that mean?” He said, “Artists and Repertoire. And I have to find your songs for you.” I said, “How can you find our songs for us? They’re 200 years old and we learned them from old-timers in Ireland. I learned them from my mother, and learned them from Tommy Makem’s mother.” And he said, “Yeah, I’ve been wondering about that. So what are you going to do?” I said, “Put up the microphones. We’ll sing. It's our job.”

He set up two microphones. I remember my brother Paddy, he took a bottle of whiskey out of a brown paper bag, opened it up... Tommy Makem never took a drink in his life, but the rest of us had a few drinks. And we sang! We just started blasting into songs. We turned out an album. We had it done within a few hours.

And the next recording session, Teo Macero walks in, gets out a brown paper bag - unleashes the Jameson, and said, “Gentlemen, your arranger has arrived."


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PostPosted: Thu March 18th, 2010, 02:25 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
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Location: Ukraine
thank you, moogums! don't know what I would do without you!


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PostPosted: Sat March 27th, 2010, 02:22 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
This it the only segment from episode "Father" I'm having problems with. British accent, you know... hoping for your help again. Thanks!

[Elvis Costello: “My father began as a bebop trumpet player, and he felt like a lot of jazz musicians out there, there’s no money in it. And when I was born he had ... out of town for singing. And he took a job in a more commercial band ... on radio show every week, he used to learn all hit ... of the day, ‘cause that’s the way many songs were heard in England, we didn’t have a hell of a lot of different radio stations in England, so a pot of the pop music that we heard had interpreted by bands that were ... kind of lineup, and yet they were doing hit of the day, and my dad would come home with the stock of ... every week, and he could be doing anything from “Please Please Me” to “See Emily Play” or “Like a Rolling Stone.” 1963 or -4, I think. My dad ... and they did it with a small group; they did it like a seven piece version of the band ... kind of bluebit ...”

[Ross McManus – “Patsy's Girl” starts playing]

Elvis Costello: It was a minor success in England, but it was like to five record in Germany, and he went over there and was on TV, and ‘cause he had his hair brushed forward, I suppose, he was probably in his late 30’s, but they kind of like said that he was like the Beatle granddad, ‘cause he dad ... ]


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PostPosted: Sat April 3rd, 2010, 20:54 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Guys, if you're afraid to participate 'cause of the legal issues, just send me PM. or i'll give you my email.
There's less and less problems with each next show. So now it most definitely wouldn't take a hell of a lot of your time. I'm just asking you for help as Bob Dylan's fan. Help to spread his word overseas!

Currently I finished episode "Summer." There's only 2 spots I'm not sure about..
But that Costello segment - is something I just can't do on my own.
Help!!!


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 04:43 GMT 

Joined: Mon January 5th, 2009, 13:56 GMT
Posts: 4
I don't know about the legality, but I think it's nice to have the transcriptions here. It's given me an excuse to re-listen to the shows, and pick up on some of the subtleties and little bits of info I missed on casual listening. Obviously, you've put a lot time and effort into this, viktorhlon. Here's my stab at Elvis for you:


"My father began as a bebop trumpet player, and he found out like a lot of jazz musicians that, er... there’s no money in it. And, when I was born, he had this other talent for singing, and he took a job in a more commercial dance band on a radio show every week. He used to learn all the hit tunes of the day, 'cause that’s the way many songs were heard in England - we didn’t have a whole lot of different radio stations - so, a lot of the pop music that we heard was interpreted by bands that were a dance band/Glenn Miller kind of lineup, and yet they were doing the hits of the day. And, my dad would come home with a stack of 45's to learn every week, and he could be doing anything from 'Please Please Me' to 'See Emily Play' or 'Like a Rolling Stone'.

"1963 or -4 I think, my dad he wrote a song. And they did it with a small group; they did it with like a seven-piece version of the band... and a kind of bluebeat. They were the early kind of ska, or bluebeat, as they were called then.

"It was a minor success in England, but it was like a top five record in Germany. And he went over there and was on TV and... yeah, ‘cause he had his hair all brushed forward - and I suppose he was probably only in his late 30’s - but they kind of like said that he was like the Beatle grandad, ‘cause he had like this (laughing) brushed-forward hair!"


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 05:08 GMT 
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Joined: Sun July 12th, 2009, 14:49 GMT
Posts: 2548
Location: A Fruit-Shaped Hole In Germany
I'll have a go soon, but I'm not a native speaker either, and so I might not be able to clear all your issues...


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 13:52 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Well, moogums, I'm really glad to know this thing doesn't bother you much, yet may even be helpful)
As I've said, I finished "Summer" episode... and "Flowers" episodes are available on dreamtimepodcast.com.. so for now I'm going to start translating these programs. I think it'll take me a month or so.. but then I'll continue doing transcriptions.
For now, I'll put here transcripts of all these programs, of course I'll be grateful for any of your inputs, Folk & Blues Fan, including yours)

Thanks a lot for Costello!


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:07 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
01x04 Baseball.
...Specifically, I'm wondering, what are those bits after the show? The interview, I'm guessing, is something that American fellows should be pretty familiar with, 'cause whenever it happened, it sounds like a legendary one). Anyway, it would be good to get some info about it.


“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night in the Big City. Somewhere a car alarm goes off. A woman walks barefoot, her high heels in her handbag.

“The Lady in Red”: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Time, once again, for Theme Time Radio Hour. And tonight we're going to head out to the field of dreams, schemes and themes. [...] diamond, to take a look at the national past time – Baseball.

[excerpt from The Skeletons – “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”]

Bob Dylan:
NELLY KELLY LOVED BASEBALL GAMES,
KNEW THE PLAYERS, KNEW ALL THEIR NAMES,
YOU COULD SEE HER THERE EV'RY DAY, SHOUT "HURRAY!" WHEN THEY'D PLAY.
HER BOY FRIEND BY THE NAME OF JOE, SAID, "TO CONEY ISLE DEAR, LET'S GO."
THEN NELLY STARTED TO FRET AND POUT, AND TO HIM I HEARD HER SHOUT:

TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALL GAME, TAKE ME OUT WITH THE CROWD;
BUY ME SOME PEANUTS AND CRACKER JACK,
I DON'T CARE IF I EVER GET BACK,
LET ME ROOT, ROOT, ROOT FOR THE HOME TEAM,
IF THEY DON'T WIN IT'S A SHAME;
FOR IT'S ONE, TWO, THREE STRIKES, YOU'RE OUT AT THE OLD BALL GAME

NELLIE KELLY WAS SURE SOME FAN, SHE WOULD ROOT JUST LIKE A NY MAN,
TOLD THE UMPIRE HE WAS WRONG, ALL ALONG, GOOD AND STRONG.
WHEN THE SCORE WAS JUST TWO TO TWO, NELLY KELLY KNEW WHAT TO DO.
JUST TO CHEER UP THE BOYS SHE KNEW, SHE MADE THE GANG SING THIS SONG. – and I’ve just sing it for you.

[The Skeletons – “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”]

[clip: “Play ball!”]

Bob Dylan: Stepping up to the batter’s box first, we got Miss Mabel Scott. She played for a short while with the Jimmy Lunsford Orchestra, and was a regular at the Club Alabam in Los Angeles. She sang with the group led by Lorenzo Flennoy. In the early 50’s she moved over to King Records. She sang this song about the greatest game on earth. Mabel Scott, “Baseball Boogie.”

[Mabel Scott – “Baseball Boogie”]

Bob Dylan: “If I pitch, can you catch? Will you hold the ball? Will you step to the plate? Will you swing and fall?” “Baseball Boogie” by Mabel Scott on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[clip...?]

Bob Dylan: In the 50’s every red blooded American boy either wanted to play baseball, or be Elvis Presley. Here’s a rockabilly song by Chance Halladay that combines the best of both worlds.

[Chance Halladay – “Home Run”]

Bob Dylan: He’s gonna knock the cover right off the ball. That was Chance Halladay stepping up to the plate, hitting a grand slam, sweeping you off your feet, scoring a home run with you, and with me too. “Home Run,” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: I caught up with Charlie Sheen at the carwash. He’s a big baseball fan, and he’s got a lot of opinions about the game.

[Charlie Sheen: Baseball to me represents life. It’s about heroes and goats. It’s about failure and success. It’s about individual effort, it’s about team effort. Baseball is about the game within a game. It’s really the only major sport that is not governed by time. And the thing that amazes me insane is people that say, “Well, baseball is boring, there’s just two guys playing catch,” they don’t understand the game within the game. They don’t understand how much changes from pitch to pitch. It’s actually fractions of a second that a guy has to make a decision that he’s [...] gonna swing and then either put it somewhere between one of nine guys, or hit it over the fence.”

[clip...?]

[Johnny Darling – “Baseball Baby”]

Bob Dylan: Johnny Darling and fast ... doo-wop, from the King Records label, doing a song about a baseball baby.

Bob Dylan: Next we have a “Baseball Canto” by Lawrence Ferlinghetti – well known poet who lived in San Francisco, he started the City Lights bookstore. His publication of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” in 1956 led to his arrest on obscenity charges. He was a brave man, and a brave poet. “Watching baseball, sitting in the sun, eating popcorn, reading Ezra Pound and wishing that Juan Marichal would hit a hole right through the Anglo-Saxon tradition in the first canto and demolish the barbarian invaders.” Well, why don’t I let Larry say the rest of it. Lawrence Ferlinghetti, “Baseball Canto.”

[Lawrence Ferlinghetti – “Baseball Canto”:
It’s the World Series, and this is a former World Series team. “Baseball Canto.”
Watching baseball, sitting in the sun, eating popcorn,
reading Ezra Pound,
and wishing that Juan Marichal would hit a hole right through the
Anglo-Saxon tradition in the first Canto
and demolish the barbarian invaders.
When the San Francisco Giants take the field
and everybody stands up for the National Anthem,
with some Irish tenor's voice piped over the loudspeakers,
with all the players struck dead in their places
and the white umpires like Irish cops in their black suits and little
black caps pressed over their hearts,
Standing straight and still like at some funeral of a blarney bartender,
and all facing east,
as if expecting some Great White Hope or the Founding Fathers to
appear on the horizon like 1066 or 1776.
But Willie Mays appears instead,
in the bottom of the first,
and a roar goes up as he clouts the first one into the sun and takes
off, like a footrunner from Thebes.
The ball is lost in the sun and maidens wail after him
as he keeps running through the Anglo-Saxon epic.
And Tito Fuentes comes up looking like a bullfighter
in his tight pants and small pointy shoes.
And the right field bleechers go mad with Chicanos and blacks
and Brooklyn beer-drinkers,
"Sweet Tito! Sweet Tito! Sock it to him, sweet Tito!"
And sweet Tito puts his foot in the bucket
and smacks one that don't come back at all,
and flees around the bases
like he's escaping from the United Fruit Company.
As the gringo dollar beats out the pound.
And sweet Tito beats it out like he's beating out usury,
not to mention fascism and anti-semitism.
And Juan Marichal comes up,
and the Chicano bleechers go loco again,
as Juan belts the first ball out of sight,
and rounds first and keeps going
and rounds second and rounds third,
and keeps going and hits paydirt
to the roars of the grungy populace.
As some nut presses the backstage panic button
for the tape-recorded National Anthem again,
to save the situation.

But it don't stop nobody this time,
in their revolution round the loaded white bases,
in this last of the great Anglo-Saxon epics,
in the territorio libre of Baseball.]

Bob Dylan: That was Lawrence Ferlinghetti, on Theme Time Radio Hour, where we’re taliking baseball.

[baseball sound effects on the background]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Cowboy Copas, a honky tonk singer from the late 40’s. He was making a comeback in the early 60’s, when he died in the same aircrash that killed Patsy Cline and Hawkshaw Hawkins. “Three Strikes and You're Out.” Here he’s talking about love being like a game, where if you don’t win you can pout, you can make three strikes and you’re out. Cowby Copas.

[Cowboy Copas – “Three Strikes and You're Out”]

Bob Dylan: That was Cowboy Copas. “You make three strikes and you’re out, if you cheat, umpire calls you out.”

Bob Dylan: If diamonds are a girl’s best friend, why there’s so many girls get mad when you wanna go to the ballpark? You tell me.

Bob Dylan: Sister Wynona Carr was a powerful gospel singer, she also recorded some rhythm-and-blues numbers. Her best known number, however, is a gospel song, and it’s all about the game of baseball.

[Sister Wynona Carr – “The Ball Game”]

Bob Dylan: Sister Wynona Carr, talking about life being a ball game, where everyday life is a ballgame and everybody can play, Jesus is at the home plate and at the first base is Temptation, second base is Sin, third base is Tribulation, and King Solomon is the umpire, Satan’s trying to psyche (strike?) you out and Daniel’s up at bat, Satan pitches a fastball and Job hits a home run, and you’ve got to just swing at the ball, give it your all, Moses is on the sidelines, he’s waiting to be called. Sister Wynona Carr, “The Ball Game.”

Bob Dylan: Alright. Next we have Buddy Johnson with his jump blues song “Did You See Jackie Robinson Hit That Ball.” He’s talking in this song about Satchel Paige and Roy Campanella, Don Newcombe and Larry Doby, too. Singing about yes, boy, yes, Jackie can hit that ball. Did You See Jackie Robinson Hit That Ball? I don’t know, I wasn’t there, but I sure fell like I was.

[Buddy Johnson – “Did You See Jackie Robinson Hit That Ball”]

Bob Dylan: One of the greatest ball players ever, the man who broke the color line in the major leagues, “Did You See Jackie Robinson Hit That Ball?”

Bob Dylan: You know Abbot and Costello said that a lot of baseball players have funny names.

[Costello: All I'm trying to find out is what's the guy's name on first base.
Abbott: No. What is on second base.
Costello: I'm not asking you who's on second.
Abbott: Who's on first.
Costello: I don't know.
Abbott: He's on third...
Costell: Third base, I know that...]

Bob Dylan: Bit they’ve also had funny nicknames. Ted Williams was known as the Splendid Splinter. Babe Ruth – the Sultan of Swat. Ty Cobb was known as the ol’ Georgia Peach. Let’s not forget the Mordecai “Three Fingers” Brown, and the Yankee Clipper - Joltin' Joe DiMaggio. And while we're on subject of Joltin’ Joe, let’s hear a song about him, featuring Les Brown and His Band of Renown, and Joltin’ Joe makes a little guest appearance himself.

[Les Brown and His Orchestra (Les Brown and His Band Of Renown) with Betty Bonney – “Joltin' Joe DiMaggio”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s another song about Joltin’ Joe by Billy Bragg & Wilco from the album “Mermaid Avenue” where they take the unfinished lyrics of Woody Guthrie and add music to them. Woody Guthrie, of course, was the Dean of American folk artists, at the time of his death in 1967, Guthrie left behind some 25 hundred unfinished songs. The lyric about New York streets, film star idols, drinking, loving, dying, and even spaceships, were specifically chosen because they presented completely different aspect to Woody’s public persona. Here’s the song that Woody wrote about Joltin’ Joe, the Yankee Clipper.

[Billy Bragg & Wilco – “Joe DiMaggio's Done It Again”]

Bob Dylan: Billy Bragg and Wilco singing their song about Joe DiMaggio and grandma, who’s listening to the Yankees home by the radio. We’re on the radio too Theme Time Radio, but I guess you’ve already knew that, ‘cause you’re listening.

Bob Dylan: Alright. We heard about Jackie Robinson earlier. This song here is about Don Newcombe. Don Newcomb really throws that ball, he winds up and throws it. He was a 6-foot-4, 225-pound fireball thrower. The only baseball player to have won Rookie of the Year three times in a row.

[Teddy Brannon Orchestra – “Don Newcomb Really Throws That Ball”]

Bob Dylan: That was Teddy Reynolds, “Strike One”, about Don Newcomb. Sonny Rollins used to have the nickname Newk 'cause everyone thought he looked like Don Newcombe. Here's tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins with his song, "Newk's Fadeaway."

[Sonny Rollins – “Newk's Fadeaway.” Time: 38:20, Bob Dylan: Let’s get going.]

Bob Dylan: There’s Sonny Rollins with his big-league sound, covering all the bases, "Newk's Fadeaway."

Bob Dylan: Alright. Cliff and Claude Trenier were twin brothers who sang with a bunch of big bands but branched out into rock and roll. Here they have a special guest with them by the name of Willie Mays, on their song, "Say Hey," from the OKeh record label, The Treniers.

[The Treniers – “Say Hey”]

Time: 42:36

[baseball clip]

Bob Dylan: Let’s check out the e-mail basket, but don't throw us a curve. Today's e-mail is from Jamie Christensen of Las Vegas, Nevada. She writes, "Dear Theme Time, I enjoy listening to the ballgames late at night. My boyfriend says the radio keeps him up. What should I do?" Well, Jamie, you should do what I used to do. When I was supposed to be asleep, I'd take the bedside radio and slip it under my pillow, press your ear close to the pillow, which is what you're supposed to do with pillows, anyway, and listen to the second game of the doubleheader, without bothering anyone else in the house. Millions upon millions used to do the same thing back when radio was king. And I hope you still do that with Theme Time Radio Hour, your private pillow pal. Thanks for your letter. Press your ear up close to the pillow, Jamie.

[Sam Bush – “The Wizard of Oz”]

Bob Dylan: “The Wizard of Oz.” Osborne Earl, that's his name, brought a whole new level to the game. That was Sam Bush. Sam is a great fiddle and mandolin player, a big session man over there in Nashville, and he's a big baseball fan. We're talking about Ozzie. No, not that Ozzie. We're talking about the Wizard of Oz, the MVP, Osborne Earl Smith. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2002. In 2003, he was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame. And this year, he was played on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: Let’s Take the seventh-inning stretch.

[jingle...?]

Bob Dylan: “3rd Base, Dodger Stadium” comes from Ry Cooder album called “Chávez Ravine”, which tells a story of how thousands of poor Mexicans were forced out of, what they called, Poor Man's Shangri-La, to make way for Dodgers Stadium. “I work here, parking cars, under the moon and stars, the same ones that we all knew back in the 1952. Everyone wants to know where a local boy like me is coming from.” “3rd Base, Dodger Stadium.”

[Ry Cooder – “3rd Base, Dodger Stadium”]

Bob Dylan: That was Ry Cooder, and a whole lot of other good folks up on the ... record. “3rd Base, Dodger Stadium.” This song has a little bit of a story, to hear the whole story, listen to the album “Chávez Ravine”.

Bob Dylan: Alright, this is Theme Time Radio Hour, we’re getting ready to head into extra innings. So we’ve got time for one more song. This is a song from the play "Damn Yankees" – I don’t mean the band that Ted Nugent is in with those guys from Styx. “Damn Yankees” is a musical comedy, a modern retelling of the Faust legend set in Washington, DC. It opened on Broadway in 1955, starring Gwen Verdon and Ray Walston. In baseball, like all of life, you’ve gotta have heart, you’ve gotta have hope, mustn’t sit around and mope. Nothin’s half as bad as it may appear, wait till next year and hope when your luck is battin’ zero, get your chin up off the floor. Mister you can be a hero, you can open any door.”

[Damn Yankee/1955 Original Broadway Cast – Heart is from the musical/film "Damn Yankees".]

Bob Dylan: Got to have heart. Got to have a lot of things. Got to have something on the brain. Got to have correct postage. You gotta have a dog you can trust. You got to have a dry hat and your lawyer's phone number. Got to have your girlfriend's credit card. You got to have it all together. You've got to have room to move. You got to have what it takes. You've got to have a hot meal and a warm place to sleep. You got to have heart. From the original soundtrack of “Damn Yankees.”

[sounds of horn]

Bob Dylan: Well, that's it for another show, I'm going to head back to the dugout. See if I can find myself a relief pitcher. See ya again next week on Theme Time Radio Hour, the field of dreams, schemes and themes.

Time: 59:30
[“Top Cat (Underscore”)]
“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Coffee.”

Bob Dylan: This program cannot be rebroadcast without the express permission of Theme Time Radio Hour.

[???: Baseball is known as a relaxing game. But sometimes it can turn your insides out. [...] after the tough one.]

[???: ...you get us just a few basic comments about your feeling on the game.
???: Oh, naturally, I feel bad about losing the ballgame like that, there’s no way you should lose that ballgame, and... That just doesn’t make sense.
???: What’s your opinion of [...] peformance?
???: What’s my opinion of [...] performance? What the f*** you think my opinion is. I think that was (beeps) – put that in, I don’t (beep). Opinion of his performance?! (beep) beat us with three (beep) home runs! What the f*** do you mean, what is my opinion of his performance? How can you ask me question like that? What is my opinion of his performance? (beep) three home runs. (beep). I’m (beeps) I lose the f*** game. And you ask me my opinion of his performanse?! (beep). That’s a tough question to ask me, isn’t it? What is my opinion of his performance?
???: Yes it is. I asked it, and you gave me an answer.
???: Well, I didn’t give you a good answer, because I’m mad...
???: It wasn’t[?] a good question.
???: ...that’s a tough question to ask me right now. What is my opinion of his performance? I mean, you want me to tell you what my opinion of his perfornace is...
???: You just did.
???: ...that’s righ. (beep). Guy hits three home runs against us. S***]

[???: Sing a song ... out of Steve Goodman. Made a name for himself in 1972 what a song “City of New Orleans” became a hit for Arlo Guthrie. Despite he was not New Orleans, but Chicago native Goodman had his heat in his own home town, more specifically Wrigley Field. Steve was a Cubs fan, who three years earlier had suffered when the Cubs blew the [...] to the ’69 Mets. It was also 1969 when the public discovered, Steve had leukemia. Goodman continued to write and perform through the years, and in 1984 it appeared Steve would finally see his Cubs win. He was even invited to sing the national anthem at the Wrigley Field opening game, but Steve Goodman didn’t get to song, or see his beloved Cubs clinch. The Cubs magic number was 3, when Steve died in the Seattle hospital at the age of 36. Few weeks after his death the “City of New Orleans” was a hit again, number one on the country charts for my good friend
Willie Nelsen. But that was not a dying Cub fan’s last request.]

["A Dying Cub Fan's Last Request," performed by Steve Goodman?]


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:14 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
01x05 Coffee




“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. Pizza parlor is locking up. A drunken security guard drops his flashlight.

“The Late in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Welcome to Theme Time Radio Hour - hull of caffeinated dreams, schemes and themes. Pour yourself a hot steaming cup of joe, ‘cause we’re gonna talk about the amber liquid of life. No matter what you call it, it’s a drink made from the shrub of a tree. I’m talking about coffee. The common man’s gold – and like gold, it brings to every person the feeling of luxury and nobility. Thank you, Juan Valdez.

[jingle...?]

Bob Dylan: Here’s the Ink Spots, “Java Jive.” The quivering high tenor of Bill Kenny, who was an influence on all the doo-wop bands [that came] in the 50’s. He sang along with Charlie Fuqua, "Deek" Watson, and bass singer “Hoppy” Jones. Watson eventually left and formed his own group – the Brown Dots. But no music was sweeter than the music they made torether as the Ink Spots.

[The Ink Spots – “Java Jive”]

Bob Dylan: “Shoot me the pot and I'll pour me a shot, slip me a slug from that wonderful mug, and I cut a rug till I’m snug in a jug.” They love coffee, they love tea – the Ink Spots.

Bob Dylan: Charles Maurice de Talleyrand described the perfect cup of coffee: “Black as the devil, hot as hell, pure as an angel, and sweet as love.“ And as good, as the cup of coffee is, it’s even better with a cigarette. As Jerry Irby is gonna tell us.

[Jerry Irby – “One Cup of Coffee and a Cigarette”]

Bob Dylan: That was Jerry Irby, one of them guys who left from hillbilly to rockabilly. “With his eggs over easy and ham, and beacon, too.” “One Cup of Coffee and a Cigatette.” I knew Jerry Irby, he own an Exxon station now in Spring, Texas.

Bob Dylan: [...] practical joker, he once said: “I told my waiter, ‘My coffee tastes like mud,’ He said, ‘It should, it was ground this morning’”

[coffee ad]

Bob Dylan: [...]

[Frank Sinatra – “The Coffee Song” starts playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: After he left Capitol records, Frank started his own label called Reprise, which means “to play again.” His first record was called “Ring-a-Ding-Ding!” and this song came from it.

[Frank Sinatra – “The Coffee Song”]

Bob Dylan: That was ol’ Blue Eyes, talking about [my favorite] brown liquid. This time he’s way down among the Brazilians with coffee grow by the billions. And he dates a girl, and he finds out later, she smells just like a percolator.” Brazil is the world’s largest coffee producer – produces almost a third of the world’s coffee.

[sound effect]

Bob Dylan: A lot of people compared songwriter Chris Difford and Glen Tilbrook to Lennon and McCartney - but they were much younger. Here they are with a stain on a notebook, were the coffee cup was. In bed with a friend, lips full of passion, and plenty of coffee. Squeeze from their album “Sweets from a Stranger.”

[Squeeze – “Black Coffee in Bed”]

Bob Dylan: That was Squeeze on Theme Time Radio Hour, all about today’s subject: coffee.

Bob Dylan: “A cup of coffee – real coffee – home ground, home made, that comes to you dark as a hazel-eye, but changes to a golden bronze as you temper it with cream that never cheated, but was real cream from its birth, thick, tenderly yellow, perfectly sweet, neither lumpy nor frothing on the Java: such a cup of coffee is a match for twenty blue devils
and will exorcise them all.” –Henry Ward Beecher, def poet.

[coffee ad]

Bob Dylan: The late great, Otis Redding. Got his start with Johnny Jenkins and the Pine Toppers. Struck out on his own, and started recording for Stax Records. Wrote a bunch of songs with guitarist Steve Cropper. But he didn’t write this one about cigarettes and coffee.

[Otis Redding – “Cigarettes and Coffee”]

Bob Dylan: “All the good looking girls I’ve met, they just don’t seem to fit in, I would love to have another drink of coffee, and please darling, help me smoke this one more cigarette.” “Cigarettes and Coffee.” That was the late great Otis Redding, who died on December 10th 1967, when his plane crashed into Lake Monona, in Madison, Wisconsin.

[“Coffe and Cigarettes” movie clip:
You've been here awhile, I see.

Iggy Pop: I've been here awhile. Drinking a little coffee.
Tom Waits: Yeah, I see.
Iggy Pop: I ordered you some.
Tom Waits: You ordered for me?
Iggy Pop; I mean, is it cool? Is that cool?
Tom Waits: Yeah, yeah, okay. Coffee, yeah. Good for a coffee.
Iggy Pop: Okay, man. Come on, have some coffee, yeah.]

Time: 23:45

Bob Dylan: Curtis Gordon, born in Moultrie, Georgia, 1928. He just died recently in 2004. He had a sound that was kind of like a mix of honky tonk and western swing but with a freer, looser, more vibrant singing style. “You gotta have in the morning, and then have at night. You gotta have something to quiet them down. Gotta see his neighbor to [...]. Gotta have something to keep them [in live]. Little girl of the street brews the finest pot. I tell you boy, that ain’t all she got. We’ve got a lot in common, ‘cause she smokes the very same brand I do.”

[Curtis Gordon – “Caffeine and Nicotine”]

Bob Dylan: It’s 1954 on the RCA label, Curtis Gordon. He had great players on his records, those boys were designing nuclear weapons.

Bob Dylan: Caffeine can release fatty acids from fatty tissue without using a [...]. Maxwell House is named after the hotel in Nashville, Tennessee, where the original blend was served in [1886].

Bob Dylan: Here’s a song written by Marty Robbins, but song in this case by Lefty Frizzell. Everybody writes about cigarettes and coffee, I guess they go together like ham and eggs, bagels and lox, cheese and crackers, Abbott and Costello, Flatt and Scruggs, Sonny and Cher, shampoo and rinse. Lefty don’t go to bed at all, he just lays there and weeps, smoking cigarettes, and drinking coffee.

[Lefty Frizzell – “Cigarettes and Coffee Blues”]

Bob Dylan: All those cigarettes and coffee didn’t help Lefty Frizzell. He passed away at age 47. Sleep well, Lefty. You’re part of our dreams, themes and schemes.

Bob Dylan: This is Theme Time Radio Hour. Stay awake! We’re talking about coffee: the cure from manic depression and bipolar disorder. Another term for manic depression is the blues. Here’s Sam Lightnin' Hopkins to tell you all about it.

[Sam Lightnin' Hopkins – “Coffee Blues”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Coffee Blues” by Lighnin’ Hopkins. Lighnin’ wanted to be payed in advance before he recorded, and he would only do the song that once. Lighnin’ also recorded with a piano player Wilson “Thunder” Smith under the name “Thunder and Lightnin.”

Bob Dylan: Let me just pour myself a cup of coffee while I’m answering an e-meil.

Time: 33:05

[sound of pouring liquid]

Bob Dulan: Here’s one from Mike Webster from Saratoga, New York. He writes: “Dear Theme Time Radio Hour! I’ve noticed you play a lot of old songs, what so you have against new songs? P.S. I really like the show.” Well, thanks, Mike. I know it seems like we play a lot of old songs, but the truth is, there’s a lot more old songs than there are new songs. We’ve got nothing against new songs, so just keep listening, and thanks for the note.

Bob Dylan: Here’s Scatman Crothers telling you to keep that coffee hot and make a lot.

[Scatman Crothers – “Keep That Coffee Hot”]

Bob Dylan: Terre Haute, Indiana [named him] “Scatman” Crrothers. “Keeping That Coffee Hot.” You might know him better from seeing him on Chico and the Man or in the movie The Shining, but “Scatman” Crothers had a long career before that, he played drums with Slim Gaillard, and recorded bebop, blues, swing, scat and all-style jazz. In 1948 he met Phil Harris and the two of them recorded a song called “Chattanooga Shoeshine Boy.” Hey! We’re gonna play that on our shoe show!

Bob Dylan: Next up, a vocal group from Los Angeles, California, called the Larks, “Coffee, Cigarettes and Tears.” I run into Billy Vera at Starbucks, he knows a whole lot about these guys.

[Billy Vera: Larks go back to the Selah gospel singers, from down in the Carolines and they were singing back in the 30’s. There was a guy named Thurman Ruth, who was the... sort of a manager, leader and member of the group. At one point I’ve found a [master...] at Capitol’s Waltz, and you know who recorded the Larks? Tex Ritter. They’ve already had made records on Decca back in the old day. But Tex heard them [...] when he was traveling the South and he booked some studio time at some barn, or something. And you can hear Tex on the [slee], “Right here we have Tex, um, you know, take one.” And it’s really cool to hear that, to know that Tex Ritter was diggin’ the Larks.]

[The Larks – “Coffee, Cigarettes and Tears”]

Bob Dylan: That was the Larks, their first single on Apollo Records. It’s the song about being a wreck, and telling you who’s all to blame, “Coffee Cigarettes and Tears.”

[“The Wild Bunch” movie clip:
DUTCH: (burning his fingers receiving the cup) Damn! Where in hell did you find him?
PIKE: He run with Thornton and me. Did his share of killing and more. Around Langtry.
DUTCH: Yeah, only now he does his killing with a coffee cup.]

Bob Dylan: Robert Walden Cassotto, he changed his name when he saw a sign outside a Chinese restaurant that said “Mandarin Duck,” first three letters were burned out, so it just said “Darin Duck,” and he said “That seems like a good name. Darin Duck.” Here’s Borry Darin, “Black Coffee.”

[Bobby Darin – “Black Coffee”]

Bob Dylan: That was Bobby Daring, singing about talking to the shadows one till four, drowning his past regrets in coffee and cigarettes. Moonin’ all the mornin’ and mournin’ all night. From his album “This is Darin,” a song written by Sonny Burke and Paul Francis Webster, “Black Coffee.”

Bob Dylan: Next up, we have a song about raindrops in my coffee. By Sexmith and Kerr. The Sexmith is Ron Sexmith, a great singer and songwriter from up in Canada, wrote a beautiful song from a few years back, called “Secret Heart.” On this record he does a series of duets with Don Kerr, who has played drums and cello with his band for years. They’re standing in the rain again with raindrops in their coffee, what’s a boy to do to make the clouds disappear?

[Sexmith and Kerr – Raindrops in My Coffee]

Bob Dylan: No use crying in [...], no use crying over spilt milk. No use putting raindrops in your coffee, Sexmith and Kerr. On Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: You know, at one time coffee was believed to be the drink of the devil, when Pop Vincent the Third heard about this, he decided to taste drink before banning it. In Fact, he enjoyed coffee so much, he wound up baptizing it, [Blur – “Coffee and TV” starts to play it the background] stating: “Coffee is so delicious, it would be a pity to let the infidels have exclusive use of it.” I also feel that way about coffee, and about TV, and about Blur.

[Blur – “Coffee and TV”]

Bob Dylan: Damon Albarn and Blur.

Bob Dylan: You know, Voltaire was rumored to have a 50-cup-of-coffee-day habit. Ella Mae Morse, on the other hand, drinks 10 cups less but it’s not doing her any good, she’s pulling out her hair, watching the clock and waiting for your knock, she’s waiting for you to come home.

[Ella Mae Morse – “Forty Cups of Coffee”]

Bob Dylan: Ella Mea Morse at age 17 started singing with Freddie Slack's Orchestra, and her vocal on “Cow Cow Boogie” gave Capitol Records it’s first gold disc. She recorded the original version of the "House of Blue Lights," which the Polling Stones later covered. She died in Bullhead City, Arizona, in 1999. Ella Mae Morse on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: Well, my engineer is giving me the high sign, which means we’re out of time for another week. But before we go, one last song.

[Glen Miller Orchestra – “Let's Have Another Cup of Coffee”]

Bob Dylan: From the musical “Face the Music,” which opened in the 1931-1932 Broadway season. Recorded by Glen Miller and written by Irving Berlin.

Bob Dylan: Right now, I’m gonna head on over to Samson’s diner where trouble’s like a bubble, and the clouds will soon roll away, I’ll have myself another cup of coffee and another piece of pie.

Bob Dylan: I’ll see you all next week on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Time: 61:58
[“Top Cat (Underscore”)]
“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.
“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.
“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Jail.”


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:19 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
01x06 Jail





“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. A truck driver runs a red light. A strange quiet man practices tae chi in a park.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Welcome to Theme Time Radio Hour. Tonight we’re gonna visit the Big House, the brig, the clink, the coop, the gray bar hotel, the hoosegow, the joint , the jug, the pen, the pokie, the slammer, the stir. We’re talking about jail a real hush-hush subject. Were everybody is hurting for someone or something. We’re gonna learn about cons, jailbirds, stoolies, lifers, new fish, and politicians. Prison, a house of many doors.

[jail door closes]

Bob Dylan: Located in Represa, California, Folsom State Prison was one of America’s first maximum security prisons. In 1968 Johnny Cash recorded a live album there. Here’s the original version of “Folsom Prison Blues” from 1956 on “Sun Records.”

[Johnny Cash – “Folsom Prison Blues”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Folsom Prison Blues” by Johnny Cash. Johnny said he wrote a line, “I shot a man in Reno, just to watch him die,” because he was trying to think of the worst reason for killing another person, he added, “It did come to mind quite easily though.”

Bob Dylan: When Johnny Cash first performed at San Quentin, Merle Haggart was in the audience, and by “audience” I mean “jail.” We’ll hear from Merle a little later.

Bob Dylan: Every day in the United States, 200 new jail cells are constructed. I hope we can keep up!

Bob Dylan: Next up on Theme Time Radio Hour we’ve got Magic Sam. “Twenty-one nights of torture, Twenty-one nights of fear, Twenty-one nights in jail, And nobody seems to care.” “21 Days in Jail” features almost rockabilly base part from Willie Dixon. Magic Sam, the Real McCoy, he’s gonna to take you for a ride.

[Magic Sam – 21 Days in Jail]

Bob Dylan: That was Magic Sam talking about three weeks in jail. Sam was born on Valentine’s Day 1937 in the height of the Mississippi Delta. He died a short 32 years later. [...] think about jail, you’re there today, and you’re there tomorrow.

[“The Shawshank Redemption” clip: “And when they put you in that cell, when those bars slam home, that's when you know it's for real. Old life blown away in the blink of an eye. Nothing left but all the time in the world to think about it.”]

Bob Dylan: Bessie Smith never wanted to be in prison either, she caught with a trifling Jane, she warned him before, she cut him with a bolo knife, kicked him in a side, she stood there laughing at him, while he wallowed around and died. She admits it, she is crazy, she is nutsy, she’s unbalanced, unsound, loony, witless and wrong, she has a great disorder of mind that impairs her capacity to function safely and normally in society, she wants the judge to hear her plea, she don’t want any sympathy, she’s pleading lordy judge to send he to the ‘lectric chair. Here’s Bessie Smith and her Blue Boys, “Send Me to the ‘Lectric Chair.”

[Bessie Smith and her Blue Boys – “Send Me to the ‘Lectric Chair”]

Bob Dylan: That was Bessie Smith, she’d rather go to the electric chair. “Old Sparky” was the name of Florida’s electric chair, and “Gruesome Gerdy” was the electric chair of Louisiana. They don’t have electric chairs anymore — they threw them out. And even if they did, I don’t think they’d name ’em.

Bob Dylan: Alright. A little bit of swamp pop from Louisiana, courtesy of Warren Storm. He got his start with his father’s band the Rainbow Ramblers, but eventually starter his own band called the Wee-Wows, and became one of the biggest voices in swamp pop, which fused R&B, Country, Cajun, and Creole, a real Brasshopper mixture. And just like Ringo, he's a singing drummer.

[Warren Storm – “Prisoner's Song”]

Bob Dylan: “If I had winds like an angel, over there prison walls I would fly, I’d fly to the arms of my darling, and there I would stay till I die.” Warren Storm with a hard-boiled hayburner “Prisoner’s Song.”

[chain gang song in the background]

Bob Dylan: A chain gang is a group of prisoners chained together to perform menial tasks, such as chipping stone, often along a highway. Besides being good punishment, it serves as a deterrent, as you can point them out to people and say, “Don’t let this be you!”

[chain gang song in the background continues]

Bob Dylan: Chain gangs are featured in a lot of movies, perhaps most famously, “I’m a Fugitive From a Chain Gang,” but also, “Brother Where Art Thou?,” “Cool-Hand Luke,” and the Preston Sturges classic, “Sullivan’s Travels.”

Bob Dylan: Here’s Chrissie Hynde and the Pretenders singing their song “Back on the Chain Gang.”

[The Pretenders – “Back on the Chain Gang”]

Bob Dylan: “Back on the Chain Gang,” Chrissie Hynde and the Pretenders. Singing about circumstances beyond their control and pigeon’s mail.

Bob Dylan: One guy who knew about pigeon’s mail was Robert Stroud, the Birdman of Alcatraz, who spent his entire time in prison learning about birds: their breeding, and diseases. We sure could use him now with the bird flu.

Bob Dylan: William Shakespeare wrote about jails in his play Julius Caesar. Cassius in the first act says:
Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,
Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
Never lacks power to dismiss itself. –William Shakespeare, def poet.

Bob Dylan: While we’re on the subject of Williams, here’s Andre Williams – a little song about forbidden fruit. Andre Williams was born in Chicago, Illinois, and got his start in Detroit singing with the group called the Don Juans. He sooner revealed himself to be quite a singer and producer, as well as a great songwriter, writing songs like “Bacon Fat,” “the Greasy Chicken,” and this one called “Jail Bait” which talks about a rough temptation, but a common invitation, a good association, but a quick limit(n)ation, that will take you out of circulation; he’s talking about that younger generation. Andre Williams, “Jail Bait.”

[Andre Williams – “Jail Bait”]

Bob Dylan: Boy, I don’t know what those are, trumpets or elephants at the end of that records, but I do know, it was Andre Williams, “Jail Bait.” 15, 16, 17 – that’s jail bait, watch out for that jail bait, fellows.

Bob Dylan: To continue our prison sentence here on Theme Time Radio Hour here’s the song that’s really off-the-wall “Prison Wall Blues,” Cannon’s Jug Stompers. Great thing about jug bands, they’re not just blues bands, they play Blues, Rags, Breakdowns, Bonneville songs, Minstrel music and so much more. Gus Cannon, one of the best-known of all jug band musicians, made himself a special harness, so he could wear his jug around his neck and play banjo at the same time. Gus spent a lot of time in Beal Street in Memphis, playing in places like the Red Light, the Blue Light, the Hole in the Wall and the Monarch, which was also known as the Castle of Missing Men. Some of them missing men probably ended up behind prison walls, we’ve got the perfect song for ‘em. Gus Cannon talking about the while mule that made him act like a pop-eyed clown, and now his head is hanging down. “Prison Wall Blues,” Cannon’s Jug Stompers.

[Cannon's Jug Stompers – “Prison Wall Blues”]

Bob Dylan: “Prison Wall Blues,” Cannon’s Jug Stompers. Gus Cannon lived a full long life, born in 1883, and passed away 96 years later, in 1979.

Bob Dylan: Here’s Kenny Lane and His Bulldogs, they’re from somewhere in Tennessee. One of almost forgotten rockabilly greats, the second ... in nobody, the mist of time as obscure as past; all we know for sure is that he also recorded a version of “Froggie Went a-Courtin'.” Here he’s taking a golden opportunity with an old folk song, giving it a lick and a promise, and going into orbit in a rockabilly way. “Columbus Stockade Blues,” Kenny Lane and His Bulldogs.

[Kenny Lane and His Bulldogs – “Columbus Stockade Blues”]

Time: 31:47

Bob Dylan: That was Kenny Lane and His Bulldogs ringing the gong, with “Comumbus Stockade Blues.”

Bob Dylan: In Columbus, Ohio, there were 5925 violent crimes in 2004, 88 of them – murders. I hope they have a big stockade.

Bob Dylan: We’re about halfway though our sentence here, on Theme Time Radio Hour, and there will be no time off for good behavior.

Bob Dylan: The sooth voice of Joe Simon singing a song by Dan Penn. Joe was able to mix R&B and Country in a uniquely Southern style, and have a number of hits in a process, including this one, the song about stealing. He knows that he done wrong, but his woman’s needs makes him ashamed, he steals for love, now he’s got to say good morning to that ol’ nine pound steel.

[Joe Simon – “Nine Pound Steel”]

Bob Dylan: That was Joe Simon swinging that ol’ nine pound hammer. Joe eventually retired from act and performing, and gave it a brush off, and devoted his live to the church. Amen, Joe.

Bob Dylan: Will Rogers said, “There’s no more independence in politics than there is in jails.” Harry Truman said, “The White House is the finest prison in the world.” Nelson Mandela, “In my country we go to prison first, and then become President.” Jimmy Patton put it in another way, “Okie’s in the Pokie.”

[Jimmy Patton – “Okie's in the Pokie”]

Bob Dylan: A thick slab of rockabilly madness, from Jimmy Patton from Berwin, Oklahoma, soundin' funky drunk and full steam ahead. A man who sounds like he could beat the devil around the stump. Jimmy is an Okie in a Pokie doin’ lots of time, Okie's in the pokie for committin' a crime, Sheriff caught him out with Jezebel, He threw poor Okie in the county jail. Jimmy Patton all banged up and refusin to back down, right here, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: Charles Bukowski once said: “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there.”

Bob Dylan: Prisoners spend a lot of time in the library. I guess, they [...] escape literature.

Bob Dylan: Here’s John Prine with a song from his second album “Sweet Revenge.” John’s talking here about Christmas in prison and the food being real good: turkey and pistols carved out of wood. He wants to play a chess game with someone he admires, he’s thinking about picnic in the rain after a prairie fire. John captures the isolation and loneliness of celebrating the Christmas away from your loved ones. Sometimes it’s not such a bad thing. Here’s John Prine.

[John Prine – “Christmas in Prison”]

Bob Dylan: John Prime, born in Maywood, Illinois. John was discovered by Kris Kristopherson when he was a mailman, right guy at the right time. Probably delivered his mail to him, I don’t know. Kris never answered my letters.

Bob Dylan: Speaking of letters. We recently received an email. Shelly Ferguson from Las Vegas, Nevada. Shelly writes: “My boyfriend and I are having an argument, he says ‘the Sir Douglas Quintet were not from England at all,’ I say he’s crazy. What do you say?” Well, Shelly, I’m sorry, your boyfriend’s right the Sir Douglas Quintet are from San Antonio, Texas, their producer Huey P. Meaux - a real gut-bucket guru of a producer – decided they were from England to cash in on a British invasion, but it was a cockabull story, they weren’t from England at all. Here’s the Sir Douglas Quintet singing “In the Jailouse Now.”

[Sir Douglas Quintet – “In the Jailhouse Now”]

Bob Dylan: That was the Sir Douglas Quintet, the greatest little English group from San Antonio, Texas, led by Doug Sahm, featuring Augie Meyers on the Vox organ. Doug was a child prodigy, he turned down a spot on the Grand Ole Opry in order to finish junior high school. As a youth he performed on stage with Hank Williams. Over the course of his career he combined Country, Blues, R&B, Mexican conjunto, Norteño and Cajun music, along with British invasion in Rock’n’roll, Garage rock, and even a little bit of psychedelic, into music which could only be called Here Doug Sahm. In Doug’s band was Augie Meyers. Augie learned how to play a piano in a crazy way: he was raised by his grandparents, and they didn’t want him to wonder off, so they tied a six-foot rope to him and tied the other end to their family piano; Augie realizing he couldn’t go anywhere hung around a piano and learned how to play it. And we’re glad he did.

[Pete Wolf’s promo: “Yama-gama-gumu-lumu! This is Pete Wolf, and you’re listening to Bob Dylan and Theme Time Radio Hour.”]

Bob Dylan: The Mississippi Sheiks were one of the most popular sting bands of the late 20’s and early 30’s. They had songs which would really put the screws to you. Formed in Jackson, Mississippi by Walter Vinson and fiddler player Lonnie Chatmon, along with Bo Carter and Sam Chatmon. They recorded over 60 songs for the Bluebird label. Including this one, the “Jailbird Love Song,” which will hit you right in the kisser.

[The Mississippi Sheiks – “Jailbird Love Song”]

Bob Dylan: “Jailbird Love Song,” the Mississippi Sheiks right here, they’re talking about being a stanger in town, but soon the police had them surrounded, and the police are making off their own laws. The term “jailbird” comes from Old England when criminals, who used to be placed in cages hanging three feet of the ground, people would call there captured criminals “jailbirds.”

Bob Dylan: There are women jailbirds too, like this one. She was serving time in Tahatchopee, it’s five in the morning and she’s sleeping in her cell, she just heard a whistle blow, and then she heard somebody yell, “There’s a riot goin’ on!” Here’s Wanda Jackson, singing like a Saturday night special.

[Wanda Jackson – “Riot In Cell Block #9”]

Bob Dylan: That was Wanda Jackson, a pride of Maud, Oklahoma. Shaking a leg and taking an R&B song and making it rockabilly. Wanda Jackson, an atomic fireball of a lady, could have a smash hit with just about anything.

Bob Dylan: Well, we couldn’t do a show about jail without talking about Merle Haggart, a man who turned his life around, walked out of the jail cell, went into public acclaim, here’s quotation from chairman Merle.

[Merle Haggart: “Sing Me Back Home” is a popular song, ‘cause there’s a lot of ex-convicts in America, and... former troop of fans that would hear that song and... It’s funny, all ex-convicts have something in common — they’ve got their time in, and the rest of you still got yours to do.”]

[Merle Haggard – “Sing Me Back Home”]

Bob Dylan: That was Merle Haggart singing one of his greatest songs “Sing Me Back Home.” While Merle was in the lock-up he was friends with Caryl Chessman who was put to death on May 2nd, 1960; they dropped the cyanide into the chamber and as the little gas was rising up, the telephone in the execution room ringed, it was the secretary from the Judge’s office calling with the night stay of execution. Unfortunately, she had dial a wrong prison first, when it was too late for Caryl Chessman. “The warden led a prisoner down the hallway to his doom, and I stood up to say good-bye like all the rest.” Perhaps that prisoner was Caryl Chessman.

Bob Dylan: Time is running out. So we might as well ve talking about our last meal. You can order anything you want for our last meal, here some famous ones: Ted Bundy had a stake, medium-rare, hash browns and coffee; Joan of Arc had Holy Communion; and Victor Feuger had a single olive.

Bob Dylan: Hurricane Harry has a list of things he wants when his last meal. Give listen.

[Hurricane Harry – “Last Meal”]

Bob Dylan: Hurricane Harry had a most unusual menu planned for his last meal, but most prisoners have simpler tastes: No.1 choice [slight sound of boiling sunflower oil in the background] is fried chicken and fries, nobody’s worrying about their cholestrol at that point; No. 2 is hamburgers and cheesburgers; No. 3 stake and fries; and coming in at No. 4 pizza and fries. Everybody loves fries.

[White Heat clip: “Made it, Ma! Top of the World!”]

Bob Dylan: Well the time just flown by, which doesn’t do in prison, which means we’ve got to go for another week. Let me just remind you, that some people will rob you with a six-gun, and some with a fountain pen. Nowadays they may use computers. But no matter how they do it, they’re all gonna end up at the same place: behind bars.

[jail door closes]

Bob Dylan: You stay on the straight and narrow and I’ll see you next week. Right here on Theme Time Radio Hour. 10.4.

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.
“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.
“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Father.”


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:23 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
01x07 Father





“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s night time in the Big City. A nightshift nurse smokes the last cigarette in her pack. A married couple has a late night snack.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

[Horace Silver Quintet – “Song for My Father,” excerpt]

Bob Dylan: In the background the Horace Silver Quintet, “Song for My Father.” Piano played Horace Silver wrote that song for his father, and there’s a beautiful picture of him on the cover of the album.

[Horace Silver Quintet – “Song for My Father,” excerpt continues]

Bob Dylan: Steely Dan fans might recognize this as the central riff from their hit song “Ricky Don’t Lose That Number.”

Bob Dylan: But we’re not here to talk about them, we[‘re here to] talk about celebrating fathers, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Jimmy Rodgers – “Daddy at Home” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: We’re gonna start things off with the Singing Brakeman, the Yodeling Cowboy, the Father of Country Music – Jimmy Rodgers, “Daddy at Home.”

[Jimmy Rodgers – “Daddy at Home”]

Bob Dylan: Jimmy Rodgers and he’s dreaming tonight of an old southern town, thinking of the best friend he’ve ever had, who made his boyhood happy, “Daddy at Home.”

[sound of a wheel?]

Bob Dylan: There are approximately 98,000 stay at home Dads, are you one of them?

[Shep and the Limeliters – “Daddy's Home”]

Bob Dylan: Shep and the Limeliters, feauturing James “Shep” Sheppard, “Daddy’s Home.” It was an answer-record to another song “Shep” recorded with his original group the Heartbeats, that song was “A Thousand Miles Away,” and a Free Ride.

Bob Dylan: This is the Everly Brothers doing “That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine.” Written by Gene Autry, who got a gold record for it back in 1932, back when “the golden record” meant something. Here’s the Everly Brothers. “In a vine-covered shack in the mountains, Bravely fighting the battle of Time, If I could recall all the heartaches, Dear Daddy, I've caused you to bear, If God would but grant me the power, Just to turn back the pages of Time...” The Everly Brothers, “That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine.”

[The Everly Brothers – “That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine”]

Bob Dylan: Don and Phil Everly were childhood performers taught by their father, who was a guitarist, his name was Ike, Ike Everly. They did an album called “Songs Our Daddy Taught Us,” and always have had a strong sense of family, even when they were not speaking to each other.

[jingle: “Hey Daddy! Now is good time for fun, ‘cause you’re number one! Hey Daddy! Happy Father’s Day, from Daddy’s baby!”]

Bob Dylan: Bobby Blue Bland, on the “Duke” record label from 1965, “Dust Got into Daddy’s Eyes”

[Bobby Blue Bland – “Dust Got into Daddy's Eyes”]

Bob Dylan: Number 23 on R&B charts, amazing and astonishing, astounding, extravagant and stupendous, monstrous, but believable Those ain’t teardrops; that’s dust that got into Daddy’s eyes. Bobby Blue Bland.

[clear sound of turning pages]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Julie London, you gonna need her inspiration, she’s gonna be a great sensation, amazing revelation with bits of stimulation.

[Julie London – “Daddy” starts playing]

Time: 15:07

Bob Dylan: “Daddy,” Julie London.

[Julie London – “Daddy”]

Bob Dylan: The Smokey and sultry Julie London, “Daddy,” a song written by her second husband, Bobby Troop, who also wrote “Route 66.” This song “Daddy” was also a song by the character Red Hot Riging Hood “A real cream-puff,” in all the Tex Avory cartoons.

[an excerpt from the cartoon]

Bob Dylan: And now John Hiatt doing a song called “Your Dad Did.” This one’s about keeping in hid, like your dad did.

[John Hiatt – “Your Dad Did”]

Bob Dylan: John Hiatt doing a song “Your Dad Did.” He’s playing with Ry Cooter, Nick Lowe and Jimmy Keltner. This record was released in 1987, this album also had the song “Thing Called Love,” which Bonnie Raitt had a big hit with.

Bob Dylan: Run into Charlie Sheen again, he’s a nice fellow. I asked him about his dad Martin Sheen, free radical, atomic molecule of an actor. He loves his father, and he had this to say about him.

[Charlie Sheen: “I think it was when I was in elementary school. I had a real hard time with separation anxiety, my dad for a while would have to stay in a class with me, and I started to see the reaction to him by the staff, by the teachers. I started to get sense that what he did was a lot different than what the other dads were doing.”]

[“Apocalypse Now” excerpt: “Dear son, I’m afraid that both you and your mother were have been worried of not hearing from me during the past weeks, but my situation here has become a difficult one. I have been officially accused of murder by the Army [...] I would trust you to tell your mother what you choose about this letter. As for the charges against me, I am unconcerned. I'm beyond their timid, lying morality. And so I am beyond caring. You have all my faith. Your loving father.”]

[Charlie Sheen: The most important lessons he has taught me: involve the truth and honesty, not just, you know, in my work, but as a person, and a value, an importance of the truth. Because he told me early on that the truth doesn’t change.

Charlie Sheen: Happy Father’s Day! I love you, thanks for being my dad and being one of the best guys of... a son could hope to know.]

[The Sons of the Pioneers – “My Daddy”]

Bob Dylan: The Sons of the Pioneers, one of the foremost instrumental and vocal groups in Western music. They specialized in cowboy songs, becoming the standard for every group that ever came since. Bob Nolan was a mystical songwriter, perhaps the very best. Some of his best known songs included “Tumbling Tumbleweed” and “Cool Water.” His songs are extremely malleable and ductile. There’s no songwriter, living or dead, who wrote and performed like Bob Nolan.

Bob Dylan: Gonna color him father, color him love, on Theme Time Radio Hour, dreams, schemes and themes. This is a big top ten[d?] hit about a father tired and beat, sitting down at the table to eat, never a-frown, always a-smile. “Color Him Father,” the Winstons.

[The Winstons – “Color Him Father”]

Bob Dylan: Welcome back to Theme Time Radio Hour. That was the Winstons and “Color Him Father.” The Winstons were from Washington D.C., led by Richard Spencer. They were signed to Curtis Mayfield “Curtom” label. "Education is the thing, if you want to compete, without it life ain't very sweet." Spencer’s father’s knew all about that. “Education next in importance to freedom and justice.” Preach on, Richard Spencer.

[Public Service Announcement: “Like father, like son…? Think about it.”]

Bob Dylan: Now we’re going to “Papa's on the Housetop,” Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell. Leroy and Scrapper were a piano-guitar duo. Leroy Carr died of cirrhosis of the liver as a result of alcoholism at the age of 30. “Baby's in the cradle, brothers gone to town; Sister's in the parlor trying on a gown; Mama's in the kitchen messin' all around; Papa's on the housetop and won't come down.”

[Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell – “Papa's on the Housetop”]

Bob Dylan: Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell, “Papa's on the Housetop,” who won’t come down – we’ve all had days like that.

Bob Dylan: “Mama loves Papa, Papa Loves the Women,” little bit of Western swing from Jack Rhodes. Jack, also known as the Rabid Vampire, led the Lonestar Buddies, and some of the finest Western swing, like this one about daddy who hits the couch, and sits and dreams, [‘cause] his brain a massive interconnected nerve cells forming the interior part of the central nervous system, while mama’s ironing linen daddy’s dreaming about the women. “Mama loves Papa, Papa Loves the Women,” here’s Jack Rhodes and His Lonestar Buddies

[Jack Rhodes – “Mama loves Papa, Papa Loves the Women”]

Bob Dylan: “Mama loves Papa, Papa Loves the Women.” Jack Rhodes was the stepbrother of famous blind songwriter Leon Payne, who wrote among other things “I Love Her Because,” “They’ll Never Take My Love From Me,” and also wrote the Hank Williams songs “Rolling Stone,” and “Lost Highway.”

[The Temptations – “Papa was a Rolling Stone” starts playing in background]

Bob Dylan: Here’s the Temptations one of the great Motown singing groups, lighter than air, and doing a song by Norman Whitfield and Barron Strong, who had the first hit on Motown with the song called “Money.” “It was the third of December, a day always to be remembered, that’s the day the daddy died; Never heard nothing good about him, wherever he hung his hat was home, all he left me was alone.” “Papa was a Rolling Stone.”

[The Temptations – “Papa was a Rolling Stone”]

Bob Dylan: The Temptations “Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” from 1972, a jumbo-jet of a song, on the album it was 12 minutes long, hit number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and won 3 Grammy Awards in 1973.

[“Pulp Fiction” excerpt: “Three days later, your granddad was dead. But Winocki kept his word. After the war was over, he paid a visit to your grandmother, delivering to your infant father, his Dad's gold watch. This watch. This watch was on your Daddy's wrist when he was shot down over Hanoi. [...] Little man, I give the watch to you.”]

Time: 44:47

Bob Dylan: “Father Time” by Lowell Fulson. Lowell was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where you still can get the best Stake Sandwich in the country. Started playing with Texas Alexander. Moved out to California, was the first person to hire Ray Charles, had a big hit on Chess records with a song “Reconsider Baby.” But here he sings about father time, and spent it all his young life with a woman, beauty like a shadow flies, and our youth before us dies.

[Lowell Fulson – “Father Time”]

Bob Dylan: Can’t mess with Mother Nature or Father Time. Lowell Fulson, “Father Time.”

Bob Dylan: Devine love and compassion is often expressed by relationship of parent and child. The Jewish and Christian scriptures call God our Heavenly Father; in some types of Buddhism, the Buddha is called Father of the World; and similar statements are found in the Vedas and the Confucian classics.

Bob Dylan: Whoever your Father is, here’s the Swan Silvertones to sing about him. A song about the Big Father.

[The Swan Silvertones – “Father Alone”]

Bob Dylan: “Father Alone,” The Swan Silvertones, featuring Rev. Claude Jeter, no relation to Derek, as far as I know.

Bob Dylan: Ran into Elvis Costello over Samson’s Diner. He told me about growing up with the musician in a house.

[Elvis Costello: “My father began as a bebop trumpet player, and he found out like a lot of jazz musicians that, er... there’s no money in it. And, when I was born, he had this other talent for singing, and he took a job in a more commercial dance band on a radio show every week. He used to learn all the hit tunes of the day, 'cause that’s the way many songs were heard in England - we didn’t have a whole lot of different radio stations - so, a lot of the pop music that we heard was interpreted by bands that were a dance band/Glenn Miller kind of lineup, and yet they were doing the hits of the day. And, my dad would come home with a stack of 45's to learn every week, and he could be doing anything from 'Please Please Me' to 'See Emily Play' or 'Like a Rolling Stone'.
1963 or -4 I think, my dad he wrote a song. And they did it with a small group; they did it with like a seven-piece version of the band... and a kind of bluebeat. They were the early kind of ska, or bluebeat, as they were called then.

[Ross McManus – “Patsy's Girl” starts playing]

Elvis Costello: It was a minor success in England, but it was like a top five record in Germany. And he went over there and was on TV and... yeah, ‘cause he had his hair all brushed forward - and I suppose he was probably only in his late 30’s - but they kind of like said that he was like the Beatle grandad, ‘cause he had like this (laughing) brushed-forward hair!"]

[Ross McManus – “Patsy's Girl”]

Bob Dylan: That was Ross McManus, Elvis Costello’s proud papa, with a song called “Patsy’s Girl.”

Bob Dylan: We’ve got and email from Johnny Depp from Paris, France. He wants to know who was the father of modern communism. Well, Johnny, Karl Marx was the father of modern communism. He also fathered seven children, four of whom survived to adulthood. His only son, Frederick Dumus (sp?) was illegitimate. I wonder if he calls his Daddy on Fathers’ Day?

Bob Dylan: And while we’re on this subject, Hank Williams, “My Son Calls Another Man Daddy.” The Battle of the Bulge of all song. Hank Williams, also recorded under the name, Luke the Drifter, and he was also a famous father. But here he is, talking about his son calling another man daddy; in[and?] the right to his love he’s been denied; God only knows how it hurts when something like that happens

[Hank Williams – “My Son Calls Another Man Daddy”]

Bob Dylan: Hank William, “My Son Calls Another Man Daddy.” Hank made his debut at the Grand Ole Opry in June of 1949; made some of the most beautiful songs while living in the world of pain. He was afflicted with spina bifida, by 1953 he was gone. He may have lived a short time, but his song will live forever.

[“Leave it to Beaver” excerpt: “The most interesting character I have ever known is my father, Mr. Ward Cleaver. He does not have an interesting job, he just works hard and takes care of all of us. He never shot things in Africa or not saved anybody that was drowning [...] He may not be interesting to you or someone else, because he's not your father, just mine.”]

Time: 60:02

Bob Dylan: This is your day, Dad! Hope you have a nice Father’s Day. I’m heading over to Samson’s diner to have another cup of coffee. We’ll see you next week on Theme Time Radio Hour.

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.
“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.
“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Wedding.”

Bob Dylan: We all know what Whistler’s mother look like, I want to know what Whistler’s father look like.


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:29 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
01x09 Divorce
There are some clips from movies/TV shows, if you know their titles, that would be great!



“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. A woman watches her neighbor through binoculars. A cat knocks over a lamp.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Welcome to Theme Time Radio Hour! Last week we talked about weddings, and as sure as night follows day, tonight’s show is about divorce. Sometimes a relationship goes down like the Titanic, and divorce is the sacrament of adultery. So join us for the next hour as we listen to things going to pieces, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[sound of gong]

Bob Dylan: We’re gonna start things off with Tammy Wynette. She sung a lot of songs about divorce, "I Don't Wanna Play House," “The Kid Who Didn’t Cover Daddy,” and this one “D.I.V.O.R.C.E.” Anyway you spell it, this song is a rolling buzz, and it spells heartbreak.

[Tammy Wynette – “D.I.V.O.R.C.E”]

Bob Dylan: “Little boy, four years old and quite a little man; we have to spell the words out we don’t want him to understand; like T.O.Y or maybe S.U.R.P.R.I.S.E; but the words we're hiding from him now; tear the heart right out of me.” “D.I.V.O.R.C.E,” Tammy Wynette.

Bob Dylan: It takes two to make a divorce. We need us Tammy’s ex-husband George Jones with a grand weeper, a rip-snorter of a song. A house where a heartbreak lives, but the wife doesn’t.

[George Jones – “The Grand Tour”]

Bob Dylan: “Step right in, take the grand tour; this is a house that was once a “Home Sweet Home;” got nothing to sell ya, just something to tell ya; something that will chill you to the bone.” George Jones, “The Grand Tour.”

[“The Awful Truth” excerpt:
Lucy: Don't you see? There can't be any doubt in marriage. The whole thing's built on faith. lf you've lost that, you've lost everything.
Jerry: Yeah, as I suppose, when that’s gone, the marriage is washed up, isn’t it?
Lucy: Do you mean that?
Jerry: Aha!
Lucy: Alright, then that settles it.
Jerry: I guess it does.
Lucy: l wouldn't go on living with you if you were dipped in platinum! So go on, diverse me! Go on divorce me, it'll be a pleasure!]

Bob Dylan: I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but 44% of all marriages end in divorce. And there are the lucky ones. Tommy Tucker, “Alimony is Killing Me” That song sung by millions by other people, everyone from Elvis Presley to Sammy Davis Jr., the Grateful Dead, and Pharaoh Sanders. But Tommy wrote it and did it first. “Alimony is Killing Me,” here’s Tommy Tucker.

[Tommy Tucker – “Alimony is Killing Me”]

Bob Dylan: A lot of things can kill you. Knives, bullets, ropes, strychnine and iodine, carbon monoxide, a radio in the bathtub, a golf ball bouncing off a tree, bulldozers, a big rock can fall on you, parachute can fail to open, car crashes, boats, bus mishaps; you can drown in a glass of water. But alimony is killing Tommy Tucker.

[???: To be fair, split right, down the middle. The house to Barbara, the mortgage payments to me; the furnishing, color TV and piano to Barbara, the monthly payments to me; the insurance benefits to Barbara, the premiums to me; the uranium and our uranium mine to Barbara, the shaft to me.]

Bob Dylan: “Back in ’63, eatin’ my cookin’ was gettin’ better of me, I asked this little girl I was goin’ with to be my wife; she said she would, so I said ‘I do.’ But I’d said ‘I wouldn’t’ if I’d just knew how sayin’ ‘I do’ was gonna screw up all of my life!” Here’s “The Guitar Man” himself, Jerry Reed, “She Got the Goldmine, I Got the Shaft”

[Jerry Reed – “She Got the Gold Mine, I Got the Shaft”]

Bob Dylan: Jerry Reed, “She Got the Gold Mine, and I Got the Shaft.” He wrote Gene Vincent song “Crazy Legs,” had a number of big hits, including, “Guitar Man” which Elvis Presley covered, “When You’re Hot, You’re Hot,” and a song about Elvis Presley called “Tupelo, Mississippi Flash.”

[page turning]

Bob Dylan: Will Rodgers said: “I guess the only way to stor divorce is to stop marriage.” And Johnny Carson said: “The difference between divorce and legal separation is that under legal separation you have time to hide your money.”

Bob Dylan: “Alimony Blues,” T-Bone Walker. T-Bone was not just the father of the electric blues, he was the composer of “Stormy Monday.” As a youth he was a friend of Blind Lemon Jefferson, and spent time as Lemon’s “lead boy,” guiding him and helping him collect money when Lemon would play. He got his start with Les Hite Orchestra, and Chuck Berry credits him with being one of his biggest influences.

[T-Bone Walker – “Alimony Blues”]

Bob Dylan: “Alimony Blues,” T-Bone Walker. “The cold-blooded world where you pawn your shoes and you’ve been abused; You got the alimony blues and you sure got to pay some dues.”

[Jenny Lewis promo: “Hello! This is Jenny Lewis, and you’re listening to Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.”]

Bob Dylan: Here are the Mattox Brothers and Sister Rose with the song called “Pay Me Alimony.” And Rose knew what she was talking about, she was pregnant as a teenager and had two husbands, she had a complicated life, but it sure sounded like she was having a good time, even when singing on serious subject like Alimony. Here’s the Mattox Brothers and Sister Rose.

[Mattox Bros. and Sister Rose – “Pay Me Alimony”]

Bob Dylan: That was the Mattox Brothers and Sister Rose, “Pay Me Alimony.”

[???: Council, I wonder if we might not get right down to the bottom line. Have you calculated what Mr. Harmon will have left after all the deductions?]

Bob Dylan: Another song about alimony. Here to sing Mr. “Cleanhead” himself, Eddie Vinson, “Alimony Blues.” “Cleanhead” just wasn’t an R&B performer, he was a great altho-saxophone player, who influenced John Coltrane, who actually played in “Cleanhead’s” band. He also wrote two Miles Davis songs “Tune Up” and “Four,” But he was at his best fronting a blues band, as you can hear on this one, “Alimony Blues.”

[Eddie 'Cleanhead' Vinson – “Alimony Blues”]

Bob Dylan: “Alimony Blues.” “She’s suing me for cruelty, ‘cause I hit het once or twice, one night I tried to choke her, she said it wasn’t nice. That was Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson and His Orchestra, on Theme Time Radio Hour, where the word is “Divorce.”

[Doris Duke – “Divorce Decree” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Doris Duke, and her song, all about walking down the court house steps. Holding a paper setting me free, big black words staring at my face, divorce decree.

[Doris Duke – “Divorce Decree”]

Bob Dylan: That was Doris Duke and “Divorce Decree,” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[???: But your Honor, a human being can’t live on $87,30 a week!
Human beings can and do, Mr. Harmon. These proceedings are concluded.]

Bob Dylan: The average marriage lasts 7.2 years. The average age for divorce is 34.6 years for men and 33.2 years for women.

Bob Dylan: “Married by the Bible, Divorced by the Law,” Hank Snow. Hank was the Singing Ranger, he was a star up in Canada in the 40’s, than came down to the United States, and the hits just kept on coming, including seven number ones, all conspicuous and distinct, evident, plain and straightforward. This is one of his best, where he talks about a strange world we’re living in, and he asks the question, is the human race insane? This is Hank Snow at his best, “Married by the Bible, Divorced by the Law,” climb aboard!

[Hank Snow – “Married By the Bible, Divorced By the Law”]

Bob Dylan: Hank Snow, “Married By the Bible, Divorced By the Law.” Hank did alright by himself, he had 85 chart singles, including "I'm Moving On," "The Golden Rocket," "I Don't Hurt Anymore," "Ninety-Nine Miles an Hour Down a One-way Street," "Fool Such as I," and countless others.

[???: Let’s see your lawyer and get this over with.
Did you bring the money? Lawyers are expencive.
Yes, here it is.]

Bob Dylan: The average cost for legal fees in a divorce is thirty thousand dollars, which is why most people say that the only people happy about a divorce are the lawyers. However, the largest divorce settlement ever recorded is 874 million dollars! Shit happens.

Bob Dylan: Huey Smith was a piano player, he was the piano player in New Orleans, he even played piano on some of the Lil’ Richard’s records, so Richard would be free to just sing. His biggest hit was “Rockin’ Pneumonia and Boogie Woogie Flu.” He did other songs like, “Don’t You Just Know It?” “High Blood Pressure,” “Would You Believe It (I Have a Cold),” a song which immobilizes your brain hormones. And this one “Alimony.”

[Huey Smith and the Clowns – “Alimony”]

Bob Dylan: Huey “Piano” Smith and the Clowns, “Alimony.” Only in New Orleans can they make divorce even sound like a party. “The monkey got arrested on the non-support, he sent for his attorney, Mt. Billy Goat; Billy, oh, Billy go wash your face, I want you looking good when you pleading my case; Don’t set no bale get him 30 days in jail, we want him on the alimony.” I think I know that lawyer.

[Merle Travis – “Divorce Me C.O.D” intro]

Time: 36:09

Bob Dylan: Merle Travis, from the great state of Kentucky. Among the songs that he made famous, “16 Tons,” so round, so firm, so fully-packed, and “Smoke, Smoke, Smoke (That Cigarette).” He gave his good friend Tennessee Ernie Ford the song “16 Tons,” and Ernie ended up selling a million copies of it. One of his biggest hits was this one, “Divorce Me C.O.D.”

[Merle Travis – “Divorce Me C.O.D”]

Bob Dylan: “Divorce Me C.O.D.” Merle Travis. One of the greatest guitarists in Country music, a type of guitar picking called “Travis picking,” is named after him. And, Doc Watson named his son Merle in honor of Merle Travis. He was never too old to cut the mustard and cut to the chase. Travis was known a wild man when he drank. He was an amateur taxidermist, he did it for his own pleasure. Is that someone who collects taxes?

[???:
Yes ma’am.
Where’s the best place to get a divorce?
Jerry, for heaven’s sake!
Well, most people go to Rhino, Nevada, but for my money that’s Palm Beach. This time of the year you got the trek, you got the ocean, you got palm trees, [three much you leave from 10 station]]

Bob Dylan: A Mexican divorce was easier quicker and less expensive, than a U.S. divorce. What made it easier was both spouses did not have to be present at the hearing, they could send a lawyer instead. Some celebrities who had quickie Mexican divorces included Johnny Carson, Katharine Hepburn, Richard Burton, and Marilyn Monroe.

Bob Dylan: “Down Juarez, Spanish Mexico is different, cross the Rio Grande; one day married, next day free, broken hear for you and me.” Here’s “Mexican Divorce,” The Drifters.

[The Drifters – “Mexican Divorce”]

Bob Dylan: “Mexican Divorce,” The Drifters. They had a lot of great lead singers: Clyde McFadden, Benny King, Rudy Lewis, Johnny Moore, and Bill Pinkney. The Drifters were one of the few groups that made the transition from Doo-Wop to 60’s Soul and never [...].

Bob Dylan: Here’s Kitty Wells asking the immortal musical question, “Will Your Lawyer Talk to God for You?” Kitty Wells’ first two hits were answer songs “It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels,” followed by “Payin’ for That Backstreet Affair.” Here she is with not one of her answer songs, but with one of her question songs, “Your lawyer called, said he had the papers all prepared; to sign my name is all I had to do, he saw the judge now he’s seeing me; now there’s only one thing left ‘Will Your Lawyer Talk to God for You?’” This is Kitty Wells.

[Kitty Wells – “Will Your Lawyer Talk to God for You?”]

Bob Dylan: Kitty Wells “Will Your Lawyer Talk to God for You?” During the 50’s she racked up a total of 23 top-10 hits. By 1974 she was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame with good reason, she opened the door for a whole slew of female country singers, paving the way for the likes of Patsy Cline, Tammy Wynette and Loretta Lynn; all clouds chasing each other across the face of the moon.

Bob Dylan: Got an email here from Ray Benson, of Denton, Texas. He wants to know, ‘Did Ernest Tubb ever recorded a song with Loretta Lynn?’ Well, yes, Ray, he did, actually he had four hit singles with Loretta in the middle of 60’s. I would’ve thought you’d know that! “Our Hearts are Holding Hands,” “Sweet Thang,” that great song of reflexology “Whose Gonna Take the Garbage Out,” and the one we’re gonna hear tonight on our divorce extravaganza “Mr. and Mrs. Used-To-Be.” Ernest Tubb was known as the Texas troubadour, his voice changed after he had a tonsillectomy in 1939, got a little more hyped up, but I think he sings great. Give a listen.

[Ernest Tubb and Loretta Lynn – “Mr. and Mrs. Used to Be.”]

Bob Dylan: Ernest Tubb and Loretta Lynn talking about going their own separate ways, and it’s not the way they wanted. “Mr. and Mrs. Used to Be,” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

Bob Dylan: Merle Haggart called him the most unique thing that ever happened in Country music; of course I’m referring to William Orville “Lefty” Frizzell, who saying says great songs as “ I Love You 100 Ways,” “If You've Got the Money, I've Got the Time,” “Always Late with Your Kisses,” “Saginaw, Michigan,” and “Long Black Veil.” Here’s Left Frezzell, “You’re Free From My Name, Dear, But You Can’t Divorce My Heart.”

[Lefty Frizzell – “You’re Free From My Name, Dear, But You Can’t Divorce My Heart”]

Bob Dylan: Lefty Frizzell, “You Can’t Divorce My Heart.” Willie Nelson recorded a tribute album to Lefty in 1977 called “To Lefty from Willie.” Lefty was inducted in County Music Hall of Fame in 1982, and has his own star on a Hollywood Walk of Fame. He had a Machiavellian sense of humor: he once allegedly told somebody that when he and his wife broke up, they split a house, he got the outside.

Bob Dylan: Run into Jimmy Kimmel at the airport, and he told me something interesting.

[Jimmy Kimmel: “There’s very few things in life worse that walking into that hose with an idea that you’re going to tell that person you’re married to that it’s over. Especially, if they don’t feel the same way necessarily. But there are very few things better than that first step up that door, afterwards. And, the feeling of relief, not just that that moment is over with, but it’s just all those negative things that have been waying you down are suddenly gone.”]

Bob Dylan: “The kitchen sink is piled a pie with dishes, all my dreams are piled a pie with wishes.” “Love Doesn't Live Here Anymore,” June Christy.

[June Christie with Pete Rugolo – “Love Doesn’t Live Here Anymore”]

Bob Dylan: Incandescent, brassy, and sassy, the cool vocal sounds of June Christie. She was born Shirley Luster in Springfield, Illinois. She sung with the Stan Kenton Orchestra, and then went off on her own, she had a song called “Something Cool,” which was her biggest hit. June Christie with Pete Rugolo, “Love Doesn’t Live Here Anymore,” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[“The War of the Roses” excerpt: Some story, huh? What’s the moral other than dog people should marry dog people, and cat people should marry cat people? Could be just this: A civilized divorce is a contradiction in terms.]

Bob Dylan: Weeellll [laughs]* time is running out here again. And all this talk of sadness and broken hearts has made me want to go down to Elmo’s bar and get myself a drink. So, I’m going to make like a divorce, and split. See you next week, on “Theme Time Radio Hour.” Dreams, schemes and themes, on the American scene.

Time: 59:15

[“Top Cat (Underscore”)]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Summer.”


--------
* I wonder, who was there laughing with Bob?:)


Last edited by viktorhlon on Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:53 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:34 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
01x10 Summer
Music in this program is just so good. Probably, my favorite lineup so far.




“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. Angry prostitutes fight over a street corner. A man gets drunk and shaves off his moustache.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

[Billy Stewart – “Summertime” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Welcome to Theme Time Radio Hour. The mercury is rising, the heat flames out from the large nostrils of the sky, and the wind is as warm as a drunkard’s breath. We’re talking about the wet, sticky heat that hangs over you. The unrelenting sunlight beating down on us. We’re talking about the dog days of summer. Time to open up the fire hydrants and have a party in the street, ‘cause it’s summertime.

[Billy Stewart – “Summertime”]

Bob Dylan: There’s a hot one by Billy Stewart, doing his version of the Gershwin Brothers’ classic “Summertime.” “It’s summertime and the living is easy, fish are jumping and a-cotton is high; you spread your little wings, take to the ska-da-da-da-da-sky.” Bo Diddley discovered Billy, he gave him a job as a piano player, but Billy was much too big a talent to stay in the background. He died in a car crash, on June 17th, 1970. He was 32 years old.

Bob Dylan: You wanna spend a lot of time in your cars in the summertime, be careful, you don’t wanna end-up like Billy Stewart, or our next performer, who also passed away in a car crash. One of the rockabilly greats, Eddie Cochran, and the song recorded many times by many people, “Summertime Blues.” But I don’t think any of them did it half as good as the man who wrote it, Eddie Cochran.

[Eddie Cochran – “Summertime Blues”]

Bob Dylan: “Summertime Blues.” That was the man who wrote it. “Raising a holler, he’ve been working all summer, trying to earn a dollar; Not going to work, telling the boss he’s sick, not being able to use the car, ‘cause you didn’t work a lick; sometimes I wonder what I’m gonna do, there ain’t no cure for the summertime blues.” Eddie Cochran, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[summer jingle: “We’re having a heat wave, turn WICE in Southern New England.”]

Bob Dylan: We’re having a heat wave, and a lot of heat like heavy artillery. When the heat is on, heads will roll. “Heat Wave,” Martha and the Vandellas, one of them Holland/Dozier/Holland’s songs from “Motown.” This record was number 1 R&B smash, in 1963, and reached number 4 on the pop-charts.

[Martha & The Vandellas – “(Love Is Like A) Heat Wave”]

Bob Dylan: “When I'm with him, somethin' inside start's to burnin', and I'm filled with desire. Could it be a devil in me, or is this the way love's supposed to be? It's like a heat wave burnin' in my heart. Can't keep from cryin', it's tearin' me apart.”

[“The heat wave continues throughout the city, as record braking temperatures taking six lives yesterday.”]

Bob Dylan: “Heat Wave” by Sol K. Bright and His Hollywaiins. Sol was born in Honolulu, he wrote a song called “Hawaiian Scotsman,” which made a star out of Bill Akamuhou. Sol K. Bright, “Heat Wave,” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Sol K. Bright and His Hollywaiins – “Heat Wave”]

Bob Dylan: “Heat Wave” was written by Irving Berlin. “Gee, her anatomy, makes the mercury, jumped in 93.” If you like to see Sol (is) on film I recommend, “Charlie Chan's Greatest Case,” “Flirtation Walk,” and “South Sea Rose.”

Bob Dylan: “People don’t notice whether it’s winter or summer when they’re happy,” so says Anton Chekhov.

Bob Dylan: Right now, Bobby Hebb. On November 23rd 1963, the day after JFK’s assassination, his brother Harold Hebb was killed in a knife fight. These two events affected Hebb so deeply that he sought comfort in songwriting. First song that came out of it was the optimistic “Sunny.” Hebb said, “All my intentions were just to think of happier times, basically looking for a brighter day.” “Sunny,” Bobby Hebb.

[Bobby Hebb – “Sunny”]

Bob Dylan: “Sunny,” Bobby Hebb, on Theme Time Radio Hour. Bobby performed on the Brand Ole Opry with Roy Akuff, becoming one of the first black musicians to perform on the Opry stage.

[Jingle: “Summertime ... When I tune to my favorite show, the listening is great when I’m grouping with my radio. All systems go, swinging summertime, on my favorite show...”]

Time: 19:24

Bob Dylan: Fatso Bentley singing about the June-teenth Jamboree — the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery. The state of Texas named “June-teenth” an official holiday in nineteen and eighty. It’s the only state to celebrate this event. “The June-teenth Jamboree, where everything is strictly free, At the June-teenth Jamboree, no shirkin’, no one’s workin’; you really want to spree, chicks galore I guarantee, grab your duds and come with me, the June-teenth Jamboree.”

[Fatso Bentley – “June-teenth Jamboree”]

Bob Dylan: Fatso Bentley was no stranger to Aristotle. I saw an interview with him once, where he was talking about Aristotle saying that the basic building block of all argument was the syllogism. Meaning, of-course, reasoning from the general to the specific; a deduction. Thank you Fatso, I always knew that you were knee-deep into something.

[Jungle: “The station for more fun in the sun.”]

Bob Dylan: What would summertime be without a Samba? Here’s Astrud Gilberto, she’s Brazilian, born in Bahia, Brazil in 1940. She married João Gilberto and they moved to the United States. She recorded a very influential album with a Jazz saxophonist Stan Getz. This album included the song "The Girl from Ipanema," which is perhaps the most famous Samba ever recorded. But this one is just as beautiful. Here’s Astrud Gilberto, singing about “Someone to sing to me some little samba song, someone to cling to me, someone to stay with me right or wrong; that would be so nice.”

[Astrud Gilberto and Walter Wanderly – “So Nice”]

Bob Dylan: That was a Summer Samba, right here on Theme Time Radio Hour. I’ve just gotten word that we’ve received an e-mail from a regular listener, Doctor Hossensloss, from Burlington, Vermont. The doctor writes in: “To whom it may concern, I know what songs you like, but what kind of plays do you enjoy?” Well, thank you for the e-mail, doc, and I’m glad you asked that question. One of my favorite playwrights is Tennessee Williams — not to be confused with Tennessee Ernie Ford. Tennessee wrote “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” and perhaps his most famous play, “Sweet Bird of Youth.” The play was about an aging movie star whose kept-young-man is castrated by the father of the girl he deserted. It touched on the themes of lost youth and aging, loneliness, sex, and pretending to be what one is not. It opened on March 10th, 1959, to great success. Among the people who loved this play is Van Morrison, who uses the title as part of the lyrics in our next song: “The Youth of 1000 Summers.”

[Van Morrison – “Youth of 1000 Summers”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Van, from his album “Enlightenment.” “The youth of a thousand summers like a sweet bird of youth; shining like the sun, looking so radiant; makes you go skipping, makes you go dancing, geting you into the rhythm, the rhythm of song.”

Bob Dylan: One of my favorite names in all of music, RCA recording artist Mr. Sad Head, singing the “Hot Weather Blues,” “It ain’t hot weather that makes me stick to you.” With a name like ‘Mr. Sad Had’ what else do you need to know?

[Mr. Sad Head – “Hot Weather Blues”]

Bob Dylan: That was Mr. Sad Head, three points down and two minutes to play. He could have called himself “heavy-hearted head,” “melancholy head,” “mournful head” or “sorry head,” “unhappy head,” “blue head” or “dejected head.” “Down head” or “dispirited head.” But instead, he called himself Mr. Sad Head. It fits better on the label.

[Jingle: “Why is everybody listening to this DJ? Why is everybody mad about his style? For music that's best stay tuned to [Bob Dylan: Theme Time Radio Hour] for a while!”]

Time: 33:57

Bob Dylan: Next up is Lovin’Spoonful. John Sebastian grew up in Greenwich Village, he made a living playing harmonica as a sideman during the Folk music revival, or as Dave Van Ronk used to call it, “The Folk Scare.” When in 1964 he started The Even Dozen Jug Band, and then was briefly in The Mugwumps, for the couple of the Mamas & Papas, and then when he started the Loving Spoonful. Some of you might remember him for singing the theme for the TV series Welcome Back Kotter, starring Gabe Caplan.

[Lovin' Spoonful – “Summer in the City” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Let’s get going.

[Lovin' Spoonful – “Summer in the City”]

Bob Dylan: The Lovin’ Spoonful, telling about hot town, summer in the city; weezing like a bus stop, meet you on the rooftop.

Bob Dylan: If you’re going up to the rooftop, you’ll be spending a time on the Tar Beach. Tar Beach is what New Yorkers call a rooftop when they go up to sunbath.

[“The Seven Year Itch” excerpt:
The Girl: I'm just not made for the heat. This is my first summer in New York and it's practically killing me.]

Bob Dylan: One of the most important figures in Ska and Rocksteady is Prince Buster. He was a boxer when he was young, but gave it up to follow his musical dreams; he had great success and didn't have to take a haymaker to the jaw. This song Too Hot is not referring to the weather but to the state of Kingston in 1967, as rude boy violence raged on and police cowered under the onslaught and the government threatened to bring in the army to restore order. This is Prince Buster, “They calling in for the guns, about to spoil the rudeboy funs, and the rudeboys never give up their guns.” Prince Buster, “Too Hot.”

[Prince Buster – “Too Hot”]

Bob Dylan: Cecil Campbell, who renamed himself Prince Buster with the song about the heat, and rudeboy violence.

Bob Dylan: According to a nineteen and ninety-seven study, in the American Psychological Association’s “Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,” the hotter it gets, the more likely people are to kill eachother. I could have told them that.

Bob Dylan:
To see the summer sky is poetry
Though never in a book it lie
True poems flee
-Emily Dickinson, def poetess.

In winter I get up at night,
And dress by yellow candlelight
In summer quite the other way
I have to go to bed by day
-Robert Louis Stevenson, slightly def poet.

If her Daddy’s rich, take her out for a meal
If her Daddy’s poor, just do what you feel
-Mungo Jerry, def poets.

Bob Dylan: Her name was inspired by a poem Mungo Jerry and Rumpelteazer from T.S. Elliot’s “Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.” Same source for Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical “Cats.” I’d rather listen to Mungo Jerry.

[Mungo Jerry – “In the Summertime”]

Time: 45:26

Bob Dylan: Mungo Jerry was formed by Ray Dorset who was inspired by Skiffle bands and Jug bands. In a matter of fact, the instrumentation on “In the Summertime” was: guitar, upright base, kazoo, jug and washboard. Some people said that song has a dirty mind; other people said, how would they know what’s dirty and what’s not? Mungo Jerry, a very optimistic band.

[“Hi! Astrud Gilberto here to tell you, if you want to tell more fun, keep a dial set to geat sound of this wonderful station, and taka a lively companion wherever you go. Take a portable radio.”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s John Brim. He’s gonna cool you off. He usually comes by at night with a cool creamy confection: got ice-cream sandwiches and dixie cups, popsicles and pushups too; he’s your ice-cream man, stop him when he’s passing by.

[John Brim – “Ice Cream Man”]

Bob Dylan: John Brim has got all flavors in cooling, pine apple too. “Ice Cream Man” featured Little Walter on harmonica.

Bob Dylan: Here’s some other ice cream flavors: mocha swirl, rocky road, vanilla fudge ripple, butter pecan, chocolate chip, mint chocolate chip, French vanilla, pink bubblegum, chocolate marshmallow, and my favorite: Neapolitan. Nothing can cool you off better than little ice cream in the summertime. Special thanks to the International Ice-cream Association for providing this list. So have a scoop with us, here on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[“Big things to do, a places to go, have a picnic, see a show. Drive with care, wherever you go, on the 4th of July. Have more fun on the 4th, listen to Happy Music Holliday Radio”]

Bob Dylan: “Fourth of July” by Dave Alvin. Dave is a songwriter and a performer, from Downey, California. He and his brother Phil formed a band called the Blasters, but like a lot of brothers, had a hard time keeping the band together. Dave performs on his own nowadays, and also performs with the Knitters, along with Exene and John Doe from X.

[Dave Alvin – “Fourth of July”]

Bob Dylan: The fourth of July is America’s birthday. Dave is on the stairs, smoking a cigarette all alone, and the Mexican kids are shooting fireworks below. If you’re wondering what kind of fireworks they’re sooting, it might have been: M-80’s, cherry bombs, bottle rockets, or the ever popular sparkler. If you are shooting off fireworks, be careful. You want to end up with as many fingers as you started with. Happy birthday, America.

[“The Seven Year Itch” excerpt:
The Girl: Let me just go put something on. I'll go into the kitchen and get dressed.
Sherman: The kitchen?
The Girl: Yes, when it's hot like this - you know what I do? I keep my undies in the icebox.]

Bob Dylan: There’s a lot of ways to have fun in the summertime. You can play a softball, you can have a picnic, you can go for a walk on the beach, but my favorite thing is to go fishing. Good fishing is just a matter of timing, you have to get there yesterday.

Bob Dylan: Another way to have hot fun in the summertime, is to listen the Sly and the Family Stone. “Boop-boop-ba-boop-boop" when I want to and "cloud nine" when I want to; county fair in the country sun, hot fun in the summertime; when I have most of my fun staying hi hi hi hi.”

[Sly & the Family Stone – Hot Fun in the Summertime]

Bob Dylan: Sly & the Family Stone. The band really was a family affair, with his brother Fred on guitar, his sister Rosie on piano, and other assorted family members helping out. Sly disappeared for a bunch of years, but he recently showed up on the Grammies. Welcome back Sly.

[“Top Cat (Underscore”) playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: Just because the days are longer in the summer, doesn’t mean that we can stay here longer than an hour. That means we gotta go. So I’m going to go out and sit on a bank by a clear river, throw my draperies off, water my lawn, tack up some mosquito netting, slice myself a watermelon, and just watch the mercury rise. They say the earth’s warming up — be careful of that global warmin’, and wear your sunscreen. I’ll see you all nex week on Theme Time Radio Hour. Put on your shades.

Time: 59:08

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Flowers.”


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PostPosted: Sun April 4th, 2010, 14:41 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Oops, I missed 01x08 Wedding



“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): t's night time in the Big City. A man buys a pack of gum, steals a nail clipper. Two pairs of sneakers are strung over a phone line.

“The Lady in Red” (Ellen Barkin): It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Welcome to Theme Time Radio Hour. It’s the month of June, and that means church bells are ringing all over this great land of ours.

[“Wedding March” excerpt]

[Reggae Wedding March playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: Love is the flower, marriage is the fruit. And so we are gonna celebrate a greatest of institutions, holy matrimony, on Theme Time Radio Hour. So strap yourself in, and get me to the church on time!

Bob Dylan: Fred Rich and His Orchestra, “Wedding Bells Broke Up That Old Gang of Mine.” Fred Rich was a band leader who led the band from the 20’s to the 50’s. Among people who had passed through his band was the Dorsey Brothers, Joe Venutti, Bunny Barrigan and Benny Goodman. All live, wires and loaded, all of boys were singing love songs, Jack and Jim they didn’t seem the same when the wedding bells broke up that old gang of mine. Here’s Fred Rich and His Orchestra. Put the heat on and the needles in.

[Fred Rich and His Orchestra – “Wedding Bells Broke Up That Old Gang of Mine”]

Bob Dylan: Bob Dylan: Fred Rich and His Orchestra. In 1945 Rich suffered a bad fall, and suffered from partial paralysis, but despite this he continued to lead a studio band into the 50’s. He died on September 8, 1956, but long before that – “Wedding Bells Broke Up That Old Gang of Mine.”

Bob Dylan: June in the most popular month to get married. Average number of guests that are invited to a wedding is 178. I don’t think I know 178 people! But if you’re getting married soon, you have to listen to Prince La La, he’s sending out invitations to all his friend and relations.

[Prince La La – “Sending Out Invitations”]

Bob Dylan: Prince La La’s real name was Lawrence Nelson, he died at age 27, it was oficcialy call a fatal grug overdose, but some of his friends didn’t believe it, one of his friends recorded a song “Who shot the La La?”

[“Lil' Abner” excerpt: “And now, Ladies and Gentlemen, a toast to the lovely young bride to be: May the flower of her sweet innocence burst into blossom and bring the joy to this fine young man. I give you that sterling example of red-blooded American man who’s admirate you!”]

Time: 08:31

Bob Dylan: Darlene Love sung at the wedding for her friend Dolores Ferguson, the bridesmaids had a singing group called the Blossoms, they were looking for someone to replace a pregnant member. When they heard Darlene singing at the wedding, they signed her right up. Darlene later had a big hit with a number of Phil Spector recordings. Including “Zippity Doo Da,” “It's Christmas Baby, Please Come Home,” and this one where “today she meets the boy she’s going to marry, he’s all that she wanted all her life and even more, he smiled at her and the music started playing, and here comes the bride, when he walked through the door.” Here’s Darlene Love with Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Darlene Love – “Today I Met the Boy I’m Gonna Marry”]

Bob Dylan: Darlene Love, “Today I Met the Boy I’m Going to Marry.”

Bob Dylan: While we’re on this subject, marriage, here’s what Minnie Perle had to say about it: “Getting Married is a lot like getting into a tub of hot water; after you get in it's not so hot.” Rodney Dangerfield had this to say: ”My wife and I were happy for 20 years, then we met.”

Bob Dylan: Here’s Ry Cooter with “what the Good Book says, chapter 22: Don’t let that woman make the fool out of you, chapter 23: She’ll two-time you like she double-crossed me.” “Married Man’s a Fool,” Ry Cooter.

[Ry Cooter – “Married Man's a Fool”]

Bob Dylan: Ry Cooter doing a Blind Willie McTell song “Married Man’s a Fool.” Willie recorded for a lot of different labels under a lot of different names he was Blind Willie on “Vocalion,” Georgia Bill for “Okeh,” Red Hot Willie Glaze for “Bluebird,” Blind Sammy for “Columbia,” Barrelhouse Sammy for “Atlantic,” and Pig and Whistle Red for “Regal” records. He got that name from a popular barbeque restaurant where he played for tips. I wonder if Ry Cooter ever played for tips.

[“Intolerable Cruelty” excerpt:
Miles: Well, I suppose that congratulations are in order
Doyle: Well, thank you Miles. You know, the urge to wedlock and form a lastin' monogamous bond sanctified by ritual, it's pert-near universal. [...] Even your indigenous Americans-- Uh, I believe it was your Cree-- used to—
Marylin: Howard and I are here because [...] I wish to execute a prenuptial agreement.]

[Laura Lee – “Wedlock is a Padlock”]

Bob Dylan: Laura Lee, “Wedlock in a Padlock.” She got her start singing with the Meditations Singers, going [to] “Chess” Records in 1966 and singing “Uptight Good Man.” Then she left to join “Hot Wax” Records, the company that was owned by Holland/Dozier/Holland, and sung a number of songs including “Woman's Love Rights,” “Rip Off,” and “If You Can Beat Me Rockin‘, You Can Have My Chair.” Laura’s locked up in a world of misery, she’s married to a new good man, wedlock is a padlock like a ball and chain. Laura Lee, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[“Wedding March” in the background]

Time: 20:42

Bob Dylan: All marriages are happy. It’s living together afterwards that’s rough. My friend was happily married for ten years. Too bad he was married for thirty. Married men don’t live longer. It just seems longer.
Bob Dylan: “I Knew the Bride When She Used to Rock n' Roll,” Dave Edmunds, rockpile, from the album “Get It.” A funky, fusty, noisesome, putrid, rank and reeking, reeky sound. Stenchful and stinkin’. Bad and foul. Nauseating and decomposed. Fuggy and rotten. And I mean all that in a nice way. Here he is.

[Dave Edmunds – “I Knew the Bride When She Used to Rock n' Roll”]

Bob Dylan: “I Knew the bride.” The song written by Nick Lowe, who for a while ther was Johnny Cash’s son-in-law. The song is alson an updade of the sond “Never Can Tell” by Chuck Berry. “I Knew the Bride,” “I knew her when she was married herself, when she used to rock’n’roll,” Dave Edmunds.

[???: “Oh God, and a wedding! All her family and her friends, and their families and their friends, and only a handful of mine. All scroungie and bearded, just waiting to get out the food. And the priest asking me, ‘Do you take this woman for your lawful wedded wife?’ and I, trembling what to say, saying ‘I do.’ And then I kiss the bride, and all those crowning men coming up, slapping me on the back saying ‘She’s all yours, boy, every little bit of her, ha ha ha!’”]

[Etta James – “Stop the Wedding”]

Bob Dylan: “Stop the wedding, he’s marrying her out of spite, stop this madness ‘fore it starts, don’t break two hearts.” That was Etta James’ “Stop the Wedding.”

Bob Dylan: Alright. Here’s an answer record, guess what it’s called? That’s right, “Don’t Stop the Wedding,” and it’s performed by Ann Cole. It was on “Roulette” record label, from 1962. “Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t stop the wedding, let us be happy too, you just can’t face the facts, baby, that he’s happy here without you; he made his choice, now beat it.” Ann Cole, “Don’t Stop the Weddind.”

[Ann Cole – “Don’t Stop the Wedding”]

Bob Dylan: That was Ann Cole. In 1956 she recorded a song for the “Baton” record label that Muddy Waters later took and made it to his signature song. She recorded the original version of “Got My Mojo Working.”

Bob Dylan: Here’s Roy Brown, a tornado of a singer, who could rise the great heights, but with a diameter of only a few hundred yards or less. He wrote and recorded the original version of “Good Rockin’ Toninght.” Roy successfully sued “King” Records in 1952 for unpaid royalties. Go get them, Roy!

[Roy Brown – “Fannie Brown Got Married”]

Bob Dylan: “Does anybody here remember Fannie Brown? She married Simple Joe, couldn’t read or write, but he was the richest man in town,” Roy Brown, one of the great Jump blues singers. “Fannie Brown got Married.”

Bob Dylan: You know who else married rich guys? Zsa Zsa Gabor. Zsa Zsa was married 9 times, she’s been married so many times she’s got rice marks on her face. Zsa Zsa have always said that marriage was like a violin – when the music was over, you still had the strings. One of her marriages lasted one day, that one was to Felipe [de] Alba Alba. She was married to Conrad Hilton, the founder of the Hilton hotel chain. Zsa Zsa Gobor, one of the mechanisms of evolution.

Bob Dylan: Time for another e-mail. This one is frommmm [sound of turning the page] George Clooney. George writes, ‘Hey! My auntie used to sing; how ’bout playing a record by her?’ George, I love your aunt! Here’s Rosemary Clooney, she’s getting married in the morning, gonna kick up a rumpus, but don’t lose that compass; Roll up the floor, she’s gonna be dancing; Doolittle drug me or jail me, stamp me and mail me, spruced up and she’s looking in her prime. Rosemary Clooney, “Get Me to the Church on Time.”

[Rosemary Clooney – “Get Me to the Church on Time”]

Bob Dylan: Mae West says that marriage is possible because it combines the maximum of temptation with the maximum of opportunity. She also said that marriage is an institution, but who wants to live in an institution?

Bob Dylan: Mike Birbiglia is a very funny stand-up comic, he talked to me about marriage.

[Mike Birbiglia: I’ve decided in my life I don’t want to get married, until I’m sure that nothing else good can happen in my life, you know. I think of marriage, is kind of like a, um, school. Like when you’re kid, like, all you wanna do is go to school, and then you go to school, and the fist week you just like ‘How much longer do I have to go to school?’ and they’re, like, ‘17 more years.’ And with marriage you’re like ‘How much longer do I have to be married?’ and they’re like, ‘Depends on how much you wanna mess up your kids.’]

[Johnny Tyler and His Riders of the Rio Grande – “I'm a Married Man”]

Bob Dylan: Johnny Tyler and His Riders of the Rio Grande. Johnny’s a married man he’s got kids at home, the wild and reckless women better live him alone, he’s got a shiny car, but no cigar. Johnny Tyler on the chopping block, “I’m a Married Man.”

[“Raising Arizona” excerpt:
Glen: What am I talking about? I'm talking about wife-swapping.
I'm talking about what they call nowadays open marriage. I'm talking about--
HI: Keep your goddamn hands off my wife.]

Bob Dylan: “Leave Married Women Alone,” a poison pen of a song by Jimmy Cavallo. Jimmy was born in Syracuse, New York in 1927, he recorded this song in 1951. Jimmy’s gonna tell you about what happened on Burbon street, next time that chick says ‘Let’s go get something to eat,’ he’ll turn around, man alive, he got staring down the barrel of a .45” Here it is consequential, meaningful, weighty, basic, essential and fundamental. “Leave Married Women Alone,” Jimmy Cavallo.

[Jimmy Cavallo – “Leave Married Women Alone”]

Bob Dylan: Jimmy Cavallo, “Leave Married Women Alone.” If you want to see Jimmy Cavallo, look in the Alan Freed movie “Rock, Rock, Rock,” where he sings the title song and amother song called “The Big Beat.”

Bob Dylan: Stan Laurel married four women, one of them even twice. King Solomon had 700 wifes, 300 concubines, knew each of their names, a real character. How did he have time to remember all them wise things? I can’t even remember where I parked my car!

Bob Dylan: Here’s Big Joe Turner, one of the great blues shouters. Started off in Cansas city, just like Irving Berlin started off on a Bowery. Irving was a singing waiter, Joe was a singing bartender. Big Joe Turner: just to make you laugh, though it’s not funny to me, I’m in love with a married woman and she’s in love with me, that’s trouble. “Married Woman.”

[Big Joe Turner – “Married Woman”]

Bob Dylan: Big Joe Turner, “Married Woman.” He had a huge hit with “Shake Rattle and Roll,” a song of great suggestion, suspicion, taste, touch, trace, trifle, and twine.

[Frank Sinatra – “Love and Marriage” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here’s ol’ Blue Eyes again, Frank Sinatra, “Love and Marriage.”

[Frank Sinatra – “Love and Marriage”]

Bob Dylan: Ol’ Blue Eyes, “Love and Marriage.” “An institute you can’t disparage, this I tell you brother, and they will say it’s all elementary.” From a television production of “Our Town,” written by Sammy Kahn and James Van Heusen. Became a top-5 hit in 1955. A song greatly admired, adored, esteemed, revered, cherished, prized and treasured.

Bob Dylan: Here’s something you may not know: 800,000 Japanese brides spend approximately 60 [b?]million dollars every year. That’s a lot of money!

Bob Dylan: Charlie Poole and his North Carolina Ramblers, “The Man Who Wrote “Home Sweet Home” Never Was a Married Man.” Charlie Poon was born in Randolph County, North Carolina. He earned some of his money working on textile mills; he may have adopted his three-finger banjo playing style because of a baseball accident involving his thumb. This song says it all. The man has got a wife who seems to be despised, and [distains corned], detested and inhated. However, not on our show. “The Man Who Wrote “Home Sweet Home” Never Was A Married Man,” let me tell you a thing or two.

[Charlie Poole – “The Man Who Wrote “Home Sweet Home” Never Was A Married Man”]

Bob Dylan: You never had no loving wife to greet you with a frying pan, you wanna hug her and you want something to eat, she’ll met you at the door when you want to come in, [and] knock you down with a rolling pin, “The Man Who Wrote “Home Sweet Home” Never Was A Married Man,” Charlie Poole with Charlie Parker and Mack Woolbright. That’s not the same Charlie Parker who later known as “Bird,” this is different person entirely. Charlie Poole who supposed to appear in a movie in 1931, unfortunately he went on a bender, he had a heart attack and died, so we never got to see him on a silver screen, but we get to hear him here on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[“Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” excerpt: “I'm here to get me a wife. I don't aim to go back home empty-handed. You’re all pretty and fresh and young. And I'll keep you in mind. But I ain't deciding on nothing until I look ‘em all over.”]

Bob Dylan: Lloyd Price, “Where Were You on Our Wedding Day?” Lloyd’s fors big record from 1952 was “Lawdy Miss Clawdy,” featuring Fats Domino on piano. Lloyd served in a military in Korea, and when ge got out, had a number of other big hits, including “Personality” and this one “Where Were You on Our Wedding Day?” “When I said ‘I Do,’ everybody laughed and my in-laws too.” Lloyd Price making us think about something.

[Llyod Price- “Where Were You (On Our Wedding Day?)”]

Time: 58:18

Bob Dylan: Alright, the big ol’ clock on the Abernathy Building spotting straight up, that means we gotta go. It’s time to say goodbye for another week. But there’s sixteen a sixteen-wheeler has jack-knifed on the Robertson Freeway, so it’s gonna be slowgoing on a way home. In the meantime remember this:
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

Bob Dylan: We’ll see you next week, on Theme Time Radio Hour. Drive safely and good night.

[“Top Cat (Underscore”)]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Divorce.”

Bob Dylan: If there’s anyone here who knows why these two people should not be joined together, speak now or forever hold your peace.


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PostPosted: Fri April 9th, 2010, 20:39 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Hey, come on, are there any real Americans on this forums (except moogums, I suppose)?
Help with that Baseball episode is still required...


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PostPosted: Wed July 14th, 2010, 22:48 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
I need help with very very last sentence, this one: [“...one night off and give it to...Eddie..... Val--Valentin gets in the first thing in the morning”] - I guess I messed up some words here.

I suppose, nobody knows what song sounds behind Dylan's introduction. So I'm not even asking)



12 Cars

The Lady in Red (Ellen Barkin): It’s nigttime in the big city. The wind picks up from over the bay. A delivery boy makes a wrong turn.

The Lady in Red: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

[unknown music playing in the background]

Bob Dylan: It’s time, once again, for Theme Time Radio Hour. And today we’re gonna talk about the endless gray ribbons of asphalt that criss-cross this country. We’re talkin’ about where the rubber meets the road, on steel. We’re gonna climb aboard the four-wheeled horseless carriage, because today’s theme is cars, automobiles, coupes, racecars, the pick-up, the van, jalopies, jeeps, junkers, the station-wagon, the roadster, the hatchback, the convertible, hard-tops, classics, pontiacs, cadillacs, buicks, low-riders, SUVs, and other assorted vehicles. So strap yourself in, put the pedal to the metal and listen.

Bob Dylan: Alright then. First up, "Rocket 88,” Jackie Brenston. A lot of people call this the first rock’n’roll song. Jackie Brenston played saxophone, but he has stepped up to the mike to sing this. “You may have heard of jalopies, You heard the noise they make, Let me introduce you to my Rocket '88. Yes it's great, just won't wait, Everybody likes my Rocket '88. ”

[Jackie Brenston – “Rocket 88”]

Bob Dylan: That was Jackie Brenston, and “Rocket 88.” On the label it says – Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats, but in reality it was Ike Turner and His Kings of Rhythm.

Bob Dylan: We’re talking about cars here on Theme Time Radio Hour. And just in a little bit we’ve got Bruce coming up, one of his rave-ups “Cadillac Ra-a-anch.”

[Ad: “It’s the ultimate in elegance, Cadillac. The ultimate in dependability. You’d never guess how easy it is to own a Cadillac – come in and see.”]

Bob Dylan: Everybody loves a new Cadillac. Next up, we’re gonna visit the Cadillac Ranch. I caught up with artist Hudson Marquez. (...) Hudson put ten Cadillacs in the ground, I don’t know if Bruce ever knew him, but I did. Hudson, what made you (...) to put ten cars in the ground?

[Hurson Marquez: Well, Cadillac Rach is an art piece outside Amarillo, Texas... On route 66, and it’s ten Cadillacs Buried nose-down, fins up. It represents the rise and the fall of tailfin. The Cadillac Ranch came about, because, all my life I was in love with Cadillacs, all my heroes drove Cadillacs. My heroes were Fats Domino, and Ray Charles, and Ernie K. Doe.

Hurson Marquez: I went to a Bruce Springsteen show, here in Los Angeles, and it was packed—i don’t know, 100.000 people—I was sitting right in the front, you know, few, rows from the stage. And when he sung “Cadillac Runch”, I kinda turned around and looked at the audience and they all knew the words. And I’ve got kinda—what should be creepy feeling, but it was kind of like— if i didn’t know Fats Domino drove a Cadillac, he wouldn’t be singing this song.]

[Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band – “Cadillac Ranch” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. I think Bruce is from New Jerse.

[Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band – “Cadillac Ranch”]

Bob Dylan: That was the Boss, talking about the Cadillac Ranch. “Cadillac, cadillac, Long and dark, and shiny and black, Open up your engines and let `em roar, Tearing up the highway like a big old dinosaur.” First time I heard this song I thought it was “Tearing up the highway like Dina Shore!”

[Theme song from NBC's "The Dinah Shore Chevy Show" (1957 - 1962): “See the USA in your Chevrolet
America is asking you to call
So make a date today to see the USA
And see it in your Chevrolet”]

Bob Dylan: From “Vee-Jay” records, Billy “The Kid” Emmerson. He’s just standing there with rubber heels, trying to ease up on a pedal, with the song called “Every Woman I Know.”

[Billy “The Kid” Emmerson – “Every Woman I Know”]

Bob Dylan: That was Billy “The Kid” Emmerson talking about automobiles. They don’t make cars like they used to – a lot of things they don’t even make anymore. And remember, there’s a lot of things tomorrow that they’re not making today, so get used to it.

[page turns]

Bob Dylan: “Me and My Chauffeur Blues,” one of the great blues songs of all time, one of the great car songs of all time, one of the great chauffeur songs of all time, sung by one of the great old ladies of all time. Memphis Minnie knows all about chauffeurs. Her real name was Lizzie Douglas, as you may or may not know. Born in eighteen and ninety-seven in Algiers, Louisiana. Minnie began playing guitar in the late twenties, and in all cases she was more than any man’s equal. She performed with her husband, Kansas Joe McCoy.

Bob Dylan: They say a good husband should be deaf, and a good wife blind. Well, I don’t think either one of them people were either of those. “What I must buy him is a brand new V-8, a brand new V-8 Ford, and he won’t need no passengers — I will be his load.” “Me and My Chauffeur Blues,” by Memphis Minnie, on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Memphis Minnie – “Me and My Chauffer Blues”]

Bob Dylan: Memphis Minnie. She moved to Chicago in the 1930’s. And had a bass and drums – she was before her time, anticipating the sound of the 1950’s Chicago Blues.

[Memphis Minnie – “Me and My Chauffer Blues” (version, excerpt)]

Bob Dylan: Memphis Minnie, you can drive me anywhere.

Bob Dylan: George Clinton wants to tell you about his automobile. He’s with his group Parliament, and he’s gonna take you out to the boonies. George Clinton was born in 1941 same year as I was born. In 1956 he formed a harmony group called the Parliaments. He has lost the rights to name “the Parliaments,” and took the S off it, and called it Parliament. He had a bunch of other bands, including, Funkadelic and the Brides of Funkenstein. Clinton is considered as one of the fathers of funk. Here’s George along with "Fuzzy" Haskins and the rest of Parliament telling the tale of the open road. “My Automobile.” From 19 and 70.

[George Clinton and Parliament – “My Automobile”]

Bob Dylan: “My Automobile” by Parliament. Most American car horns beep in the key of F – for “funk.” Free your mind, and your ass will follow.

[sounf of beep]

Bob Dylan: You know what that sound means. It means it’s an email time again. This one comes from Chuck Lorre of Davenport, Iowa. Chuck wants to know if I like movie “Bonny and Clyde?” Well, yes, as a matter of fact I do. And did you know that Clyde Barrow, whose middle name was Champion, of Bonny and Clyde fame, wrote a letter once to Hendy Ford in 19 and 34, one month before Clyde and the cigar-smoking gun-toting Bonnie were killed in the shootout with the police. Clyde stopped running from the federal authorities long enough to write would, quote: “Dandy car... Ford made... for sustained speed and freedom from trouble the Ford has got every other car skinned, and even if my business hasen’t been strickly legal it don’t hurt anything to tell you what a fine car you got.” Thanks for your letter Chuck! Perhaps he and Bonny wouldn’t have gotten into that much trouble if, instead of a Ford, they had ridden in a ‘Christian Automobile.’

[Dixie Hummingbirds – “Christian's Automobile” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Hare are the Dixie Hummingbirds on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Dixie Hummingbirds – “Christian's Automobile”]

Bob Dylan: That was the Dixie Hummingbirds who got their star in Greenville, South Carolina. The relocated to Philadelphia in 1942 under the direction of Ira Tucker. They were well known for many songs, including, “Trouble in My Way,” “Let’s Go Out to the Programs,” “Christian’s Testimonial,” “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve seen,” and the one we’ve just heard where “Satan is trying to flag ‘em down. Check your tires, you got a rough road ahead; Check your brakes, stop your wicked ways; check on your generator, you’ll need more strength and power; Not worried about no parking place, I just want to see my Savior face to face.” Dixie Hummingbirds, “Christian Automobile,” with a rattle-free airflat construction and a jetfire engine, here on Theme Time Radio Hour, where we’re talking about cars. And a little bit about trucks and buses.

Bob Dylan: Next up the lovely and spectacular Joni Mitchell, from Fort Macleod, Alberta, Canada. She was born in 1943... had polio when she was in the age of nine – that’s a hell of a thing. And she recovered in the children’s hospital where she began her performing career by singing to the other patients there. Later she taught herself to play guitar with the aid of Pete Seeger instruction book. I might’ve seen that saaame book.

Bob Dylan: Here she is, waiting for a car, climbing up the hill, waiting for her sugar to show. Joni Mitchell, “Car on a Hill.”

[Joni Mitchell – “Car on a Hill”]

Bob Dylan: “Car on a Hill” was featured on Joni’s-f-uuum 19 and 74 album called “Court and Spark.” One of my favorite records. Joni and I go back a long ways. Not all the way back, but pretty far. I’ve been in a car with Joni. Joni was driving a Lincoln. Excellent driver — I felt safe.

[some music starts to play and abruptly stops]

Bob Dylan: We’re gonna pause here for a word from our sponsor: Pete Epstein Pontiac.

[Frank Sinatra – commercial jingle for “Peter Epstein’s Pontiac”]

Bob Dylan: Now that’s a good one, hmm.

Bob Dylan: Right now, here’s the great blues harmonica player Sonny Boy Williamson, from Grendora, Mississipi. We’d like to remind you that the one who drives, when he's been drinking, depends on you, to do his thinking. Here’s Sonny Boy Williamson, “Pontiac Blues” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Sonny Boy Williamson II – “Pontiac Blues”]

Bob Dylan: Sonny Boy Williamson Two also known as Alec Miller. He was the more famous of the two Sonny Boys, recorded for “Chess Records,” and he also had a show down in Helena, Arkansas called “King Biscuit Flower Hour,” [which] he probably played songs just like this. “Pontiac Blues,” Sonny Boy Williamson, the man with the full size spare in the trunk.

[sound of car’s horn, possibly beginning of Jimmy Caroll – “Big Green Car”]

Bob Dylan: Here’s a rockabilly song by Jimmy Caroll, all about a Big Green Car, a masterpiece, of engineering and style.

[Jimmy Caroll – “Big Green Car”]

Bob Dylan: That was Jimmy Caroll, talking about his “Big Green Car,” probably chopped and channeled with Baby Moon hubcaps, maybe a 32 Grille Shell, maybe Hi-Boy Roadster with a ragtop, whatever it is, sounds like it ate up the road.

[Keb Mo: Hello, this is Keb Mo, and you’re listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host Bob Dylan.]

Bob Dylan: Coming up next, “Get Out of the Car” by Richard Berry. A hungry young multi-talented man with an envelope pushing career vision from languid doo wop to feral R&B. There's consistent greatness in just about every groove, from Richard's youthful homage to the Fats Domino, right straight through to wild session that brought the world Yama Yama Pretty Mama and that uninhibited rocker Louie Louie. ( http://www.acerecords.co.uk/content.php ... lease=4472) So here it is, “Get Out of the Car” by Richard Berry.

[Richard Berry – Get Out Of The Car]

Bob Dylan: If Richard won't drive you home, I will. I got a car of my own.

Bob Dylan: Tail-lights on the freeway tonight. I don’t know where they been, where they’re going. They’re backed up all the way to the big bridge. Ohhh! If I had wings like a dove, ohhh! would I fly away. [laughs] I’d fly right out above all that traffic out there. All them cars. Look at ‘em all. So far off. So far so good. Over the hills, far away. Farewell!

Bob Dylan: Alright, I want everybody go out and paint their cars with red and white tonight, we want a Pink Car Nation.

[“Even the hot rod addict with his craving for speed is given a chance to release his youthful energies. Hot rod clubs, staged special races... Plenty of speed here.”]

[David Lindley and El Rayo-X – “Mercury Blues” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Here we have David Lindley and El Rayo-Xm, crazy about a Mercury. Dave is a great instrumentalist, known as much for his great guitar playing as he is for his loud polyester shirts and mutton chop sideburns. He loves himself a Mercury. He’ll tell you what he’d do, if he had any money he’d go downtown and buy a Mercury or two. David Lindley on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[David Lindley and El Rayo-X – “Mercury Blues”]

Bob Dylan: David Lindley, often considered a musician’s musician, well known a session player working with Rod Stewart, Linda Rondstadt, Ry Cooder and Warren Zevon. Perhaps best known as working with Jackson Brown. He started his band “El Rayo-X” in 19 and 81 with Bernie Larsen, Jorge Calderón, Ian Wallace, Ras Pierre and Henry Kaiser. They travel around the county in the Mercury.

[“Luxury in the Mercury. Quality and beauty too. Then add economy, and there’s your Mercury. Your Mercury waits for you.]

Bob Dylan: Here come Smileyyy. Too many drivers at your wheel, Smiley Lewis. His given name is Overton Lemons – I oughta use that name! Smiley’s from New Orleans, he wrote and recored such songs as “Blue Monday,” the original of "I Hear You Knocking," (its immortal piano solo courtesy of – guess who – Huey Smith), and “One Night.” “Too Many Drivers,” Smiley Lewis, check your oil, baby.

[Smiley Lewis – “Too Many Drivers”]

Bob Dylan: Too many drivers at your wheel, Smiley Lewis. Strangely, Fats Domino fared better with some of Smiley Lewis' tunes, better than Lewis did ant a lot of people thought that they were Fat’s tunes. "Blue Monday" in particularly. Sssimilarly, Elvis Presley cleaned up the naughty "One Night" and hit big with it.

Bob Dylan: Smiley always said a lot of jokes in his act. One of the jokes was, “I know the guy that put a beard on a Ford and call him Lincoln.”

Bob Dylan: Up next, we’ve got Prince. And just like Judy Garland, he’s from Minnesota too.

[“And now the completely new Corvette Stingray, for 1963, the new Corvette Sportcoop(?), the most exciting hardtop model you ever laid eyes on. It’ll be a pacesetter for years to come.”]

Bob Dylan: Alright, “Little Red Corvette” is one of Prince’s most well-known songs. The song was his biggest hit at the time and his first reached top-10 status in the USA.

Bob Dylan: Prince is from the same, sorta, area of the country that I'm from so we have plenty in common. Anyway, here’s “Little Red Corvett.” Prince.

[Prince – “Little Red Corvette”]

Bob Dylan: That was the Purple One, with more than enough gas. [laughs] “Little Red Corvette,” driving way to fast, with a pocket full of Trojan horses, and some of them used. Our Little Red Corvette hot(hard, heart?)lifting car, much too fast, bolero red, with a body that oughta be in jail, on the verge of being obscene, we’re brought down to the ground, way below your expectations and exactly in line with your hoops. First Corvette was made by Chevrolet in year 19 and 53, I bet that was before Prince was even born! That was an instant success. And it cost three Grand – I know, I tried to buy one for no money down.

[Chuck Berry – “No Money Down” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: Go ahead Chuck… Let's get it goin'.

[Chuck Berry – “No Money Down”]

Bob Dylan: That was Chuck Berry, who needs no introduction; “No Money Down,” the song that talks about four carburetors, two straight exhausts; a car that burns aviation fuel no matter what it costs; Chuck wants railroad air horns, a yellow convertible, a four-door de Ville that challenges ‘em all; he wants you to give it to him for nothing, he wants to buy it free, no money down.

Bob Dylan: Interesting to note, Chuck told me his first musical appearances were in his high school of all places, like many of us get started. Chuck’s music always has that hidden thing about it where, y’know the cause is always hidden but the effect is known. “No Money Down.” Chuck Berry. Always one jump ahead.

Bob Dylan: Well, the little needle's pointin' on the E, which means we're out of gas for another week. Remember, the trick is to drive so that your license expires before you do. Buckle up for safety, we’ll see you next week on Theme Time Radio Hour, your home for dreams,
themes and schemes.

[“Top Cat (Underscore)"]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Rich Man, Poor Man.”

[“...one night off and give it to...Eddie..... Val--Valentin gets in the first thing in the morning”]


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PostPosted: Thu July 15th, 2010, 19:59 GMT 
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Quote:
I suppose, nobody knows what song sounds behind Dylan's introduction. So I'm not even asking)


I guess I won't tell you then that it's "Frantic Freeway" by The Spike Jones Orchestra. :lol:

The last sentence is from the Pete Epsteen Pontiac commercial. Frank Sinatra is speaking...

"...Run that off and give it to, uh, Eddie. Be sure that Val Valentin gets that the first thing in the morning."

Val Valentin was an ah "associate" of Sinatra's who was responsible for building the MGM/Verve Studios in New York. He's listed on several Sinatra recordings as the "Director of Engineering."

Pete Epsteen's name was spelled with two "e"s, btw. Those interested in the full story of why ol' Blue Eyes (as well as Dino and Sammy Davis Jr.) were crooning for a Skokie, ILL car dealership can read/hear all about it in the Dreamtime episode, "All Mobbed Up."


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PostPosted: Thu July 15th, 2010, 20:39 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
Posts: 106
Location: Ukraine
Oh great! Thanks so much, Fred! ..and I always enjoy your podcast very much!

I had to guess, it was Sinatra's voice.. But once he said "Eddie" (as if "Eddie G.") I started to think it was just random piece of recording.

Overall, Dylan's style on this particular show is kind of unusual, seems like very relaxed. And you can almost feel "real" Dylan's personality on this one. While my fav episodes so far are, probably, Baseball and Flowers, this one is really stands out.


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PostPosted: Fri July 16th, 2010, 01:08 GMT 

Joined: Fri March 5th, 2010, 14:43 GMT
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Location: Ukraine
Well, only one major question about this episode. After the last song, right in between the sound of yodeling and the excerpt from "My Man Godfrey," Bob Dylan saying [... to get caught.] something I cant quite understand.
Oh, and after the word about “Swedish Model” (after the song “The Welfare Turns its Back on You” by Freddie King) ther's brief excerpt from some movie - a girl saying something loudly - possibly in Swedish. - If anyone knows what that is, please share)


13 Rich Man, Poor Man



The Lady in Red (Ellen Barkin): It's night time in the Big City. A guilty man goes home to his wife. It's time to make the doughnuts.

The Lady in Red: It’s Theme Time Radio Hour with your host Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan: Time for Theme Time Radio Hour. This week we’re gonna take a look at two different kinds of people. Them that’s got, and them that needs. We’re gonna talk about a dichotomy between the rich man and the poor man.

[Sulliavan’s Travels excerpt:
Burrows: If you'll permit me to say so, sir, the subject is not an interesting one. The poor know all about poverty and only the morbid rich would find the topic glamorous. ]

Bod Dylan: Bob Miller wrote a song about both of them. He knew that poor reople have something that no millionaire has: poverty. Here’s the story about the Rich Man and Poor Man. “The Rich Man who steals from the bank that he controls, and the poor man who steals a loaf of bread or a penny's worth of rolls. One goes away a-laughing, the other’s in tears; The rich man gets an apology while the poor man gets ten years.” All kinds of life lessons in this song with no crap-ola.

[Bob Miller – “The Rich Man and the Poor Man”]

Bob Dylan: That was Bob Miller, “The Rich Man and the Poor Man.” I’ve known both and there’s good of each. Bob Miller was born in Memphis, Tennessee, and he moved to New York to become a ranger. He wrote a number of songs himself, including the World War II anthem "There's a Star Spangled Banner Waving Somewhere." This song became so popular that when it hit three million in record and sheet music sails, Bob Milles inserted an ad in “Variety” asking big-name band leaders to, please, not play it. When the song made the Hit Parade he threatened to sue, he said that his reputation was at stake. He felt his music must have the common touch – it is violated unless done by a true son of the soil. Bob Miller, the man you couldn’t jack around, on Theme Time Radio Hour. (http://www.folkarchive.de/bmiller.html)

[My Man Godfrey excerpt:
Godfrey Smith/Parke: (dryly) Mike, I wouldn't worry. Prosperity's just around the corner.
Mike (Pat Flaherty): Yeah. It's been there a long time. I wish I knew which corner.
]

Bob Dylan: A lot of people have gone from rags to riches. Tom Jones, Marla Maples, Helen Keller, Eva Gardner, Andrew Carnegi, Aristotle Onassis, and this man here Tony Bennett. He went from rags to riches by having number one hits. Like this one from 19 and 51, “From Rags to Riches.” A song right on the bleedin' edge.

[Tony Bennett – “Rags to Riches”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Rags to Riches,” Tony Bennett. I hear the story once about Tony. They wanted him to sing the national anthem at 19 and 61 Preakness. He didn’t want to. He said, ‘I don’t know. Bombs burstin’ in air are just not my thing.’ Way to go, Tony. “Rags to Riches” on Theme Time Radio Hour, get rich quick themes, dreams, and schemes.

Bob Dylan: That brings us to out next song. This is Little Ricjard before he became Little Richard – he was still Richard Wayne Penniman, and he sounds like it. Singing here “Gonna get rich quick/ This is my lucky day/ So, stick around baby,/ N' ev'ryhting will be okay.” The song was written by jazz critic Leonard Feather. How come music critics don’t write songs anymore?

[Little Richard (as Richard Wayne Penniman) – “Get Rich Quick”]

Bob Dylan: The Georgia Peach, Little Richard, “Get Rich Quich.” Some of my favorite get-rich-quick schemes include ‘The Pyramid Scheme,’ that’s when you exchange money primarily for enrolling other people into the scheme. The money simply travels up the chain, and only the person who started it wins. I also like ‘Ponzi Scheme,’ those were namen after Charles Ponzi. That’s a a fraudulent investment, much like a Pyramid scheme, often referred to as "Robbing Peter to pay Paul." And if that don’t work, just ask Ron Ron Popeil – the creator of ‘The Pocket Fisherman.’ He also invented the Veg-O-Matic, the Dial-O-Matic, the Inside-The-Shell Egg Scrambler, Hair in a Can, and the Smokeless Ashtray. Thanks, Ron, for making my life a little easier.

[sound of cash register opening]

Bob Dylan: We’ve got an email here from Alan Dershowitz of, um, Harvard Law School in Boston. Describes himself as “a feisty civil libertarian.” (http://www.israelnewsagency.com/israelj ... 30112.html) [inhales] Alright. Hell hath no fury like a lawyer scorned (Thompson. I wanted to dance with joy right there in the courtroom. Hell hath no fury like a lawyer scorned. — Legal Tender by Lisa Scottoline) Let’s take a look at what he wants. He asks “Where Buck Owens got his start?” Well, I’m gonna answer your wuestion Alan, but don’t be surprised if I call you up for some free legal advice. Buck Owens was a session guitar player who played with the Farmer Boys. In the mid-’fifties their producer Ken Nelso heard Buck and decided to sign him up. And their partnership lasted for many, many years. Here’s the Farmer Boys with their story about Charming Betsy, who been comin' round the mountain wearing her best perfume, But his gal who wear no perfume at all, but you can smell her just the same. Here’s “Charming Betsy” by the Farmer Boys.

[The Farmer Boys – “Charming Betsy”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Charming Betsy” by the Farmer Boys. A popular song that was truly part of the folk process. The song dates back all the way to t the minstrel tradition and the Salem witch trials. Back then they didn’t say “Rich girl, poor girl,” the lyrics were about “the black gal and the yellow gal,” but was still the same song, and that’s the hooey.

[[Sulliavan’s Travels excerpt:
Burrows: You see, sir, rich people think of poverty in the negative, as the lack of riches - as disease might be called the lack of health. But it isn't, sir. Poverty is not the lack of anything, but a positive plague, virulent in itself, contagious as cholera, with filth, criminality, vice and despair as only a few of its symptoms.]

Bob Dylan: On October 24th 19 and 29 the stock market fell – Black Friday made many rich men into poor men. Suddenly the wealthy were on street corners selling apples. Whether it was Black Friday or today, there are too many people out there who need to ask, “Brother, can you spare a dime?” Here’s Bing Crosby on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Bing Crosby – “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?”]

Bob Dylan: “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?” Bing Crosby. One of the most influential singers in the20th century. He changed the way we listen to singers. Before him, singer had to belt it out, being able to sing over a large band in a concert hall. The emerging microphone technology allowed Bing to add a level of subtlety, nuance and insinuation. “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?” was written by Jay Gorney and "Yip" Harburg. “Yip” also worked with Harold Arlen on a lot of the songs from The Wizard of Oz.

[Excerpt from “If I only Had a Brain/Heart/Nerve” of The Wizard of Oz:
“I would dance and be merry, life would be a ding-a-derry, / If I only had a brain.”]

Bob Dylan: Reminds me of what Confucius said: “In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of.” Smart guy that Confucius.

Bob Dylan: Here we have Tom Waits, a song about the nickel, which was “Skid Row” in Los Angeles. It’s called the Nickel, ‘cause it’s sited on the Fifth Street in downtown Los Angeles. A lot of Rich people live in Los Angeles; unfortunately, there’s also a lot who are down on their luck. Here’s Tom to sing about them, “On the Nickel,” “So you better bring a bucket,/ There’s a hole in the pail,/ And if you don't get my letter,/ Then you'll know that I'm in jail.” Tom Waits, “On the Nickel.”

[Tom Waits – “On the Nickel”]

Bob Dylan: That was Tom Waits doing his classic song, “On the Nickel.” Tome sued the Frito Lay company because they tried to use an imitator for one of their commercials when he turned them down. This is from the court decision, and I quote: “Waits has a raspy, gravelly singing voice, described by one fan as ‘like how you'd sound if you drank a quart of bourbon, smoked a pack of cigarettes, and swallowed a pack of razorblades, after not sleeping for three days.’” Or as I like to put it – beautiful.

[Billy F. Gibbons: Hey(...), it’s Billy F. Gibbons, and you’re listening right here, right now to Theme Time Radio Hour, with Bob Dylan.]

Bob Dylan: Here’s Fiddlin’ John Carson, and a song which is as relevant today, as it was when it was recorded in the 30’s, “Taxes on the Farmer Feeds Them All” By Fiddlin’ John Carson with his old friend Moonshine Kate. Lookout, here they come.

[Fiddlin’ John Carson with Moonshine Kate – “Taxes on the Farmer Feeds Them All”]

Bob Dylan: That was Fiddlin’ John Carson with Moonshine Kate, “Taxes on the Farmer Feeds Them All.” Keeping the work of Fiddin’ Jogn alive is Willie Nelson with his yearly concert to help the farmers “Farm Aid.” Good job, Willie.

Bob Dylan: Next up, on Theme Time Radio Hour, here’s Louis Armstrong talking about “Pittsburgh, Vicksburg, Harrisburg, all the burgs, all aboard with Satchmo. Goona dodge the yard bulls when you’re riding the blinds. Louis Armstrong, the engineer and the brakeman too.

[Louis Armstrong – “Hobo, You Can't Ride This Train” starts playing]

Bob Dylan: “Hobo, You Can't Ride This Train”

[Louis Armstrong – “Hobo, You Can't Ride This Train” Time: 33:46: Bob Dylan: Sing it Louis.]

Bob Dylan: That was Louis Armstrong, talking about being on the fly, catching the westbound cannonball, and them cattle crates, trying to stay away from the bone polishers and out of the Big House. I don’t think he’s talking about Amtrak. Louis Armstrong, talking about “Hobo, You Can’t Ride This Train.”

Bob Dylan: Some notable hobos have been Boxcar Betty, Jack Dempsey – probably the greatest heavy weight champion boxer of all time. He was a hobo at one point in his life, he used to walk into a saloons looking for fights, saying, ”I can’t sing and I can’t dance, but I can lick any man in the house.” Clark Gable was a hobo, Woody Guthrie was a hobo, and Eugene O'Neill, Harry Partch, Utah Phillips, Jack Kerouac, Jimmie Rodgers, and Jack London was a hobo. If you’d like to learn more about hobos, throw all your money away and catch the first train heading north.

Bob Dylan: Next up, a very sad song. Woody Guthrie and the song called “Do Re Mi” – “ou can’t get by without it, and if you don’t got it, “you better go back to beautiful Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Georgia, Tennessee. California is a garden of Eden, But believe it or not, you won’t find it so hot, If you ain’t got the do re mi.”

[Woody Guthrie – “Do Re Mi”]

Bob Dylan: That was Woody Guthrie, Woodrow Wilson Guthrie, from Okemah, Oklahoma. Born in 19 and 13 (sic!), Woody carried a guitar that said “This machine kills fascists.” I recommend everybody go out and read his book, “Bound for Glory.”

[“Trading Places” excerpt:
Billy Ray Valentine: You know, you can't just go around and shoot people in the kneecaps with a double-barreled shotgun 'cause you pissed at 'em.
Louis Winthorpe III: Listen, do you have any better ideas?
Billy Ray Valentine: Yeah. You know, it occurs to me that the best way you hurt rich people is by turning them into poor people.]

Bob Dylan: As Mae West said, “I’ve been rich and I’ve been poor. Believe me, rich is better.” We’re talking a lot about poor people – let’s go on the other side of the tracks. I like talking about rich men a little better, they’re a little more happy-go-lucky. You know what’s better than a little money? A lot of money! This is Little Millette and His Creoles from “Specialty” record label. This song is written by Dorothy La Bostrie, who claim to have written “Tutti-Frutti” for Little Richard. She has written the whole a lot of other great dongs though, like “I Won’t Cry” by Johnny Adams,“ You Can Have My Husband But Please Don't Mess With My Man,” by Irma Thomas, and this one, “Rich Woman,” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Little Millette and His Creoles – “Rich Woman”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Rich Woman” by Little Millette. The richest woman in America in 2005 was Liliane Bettencourt, the daughter of L'Oréal’s founder; she’s worth–somewhere around–16 billion – that’s “billion” with a “B.” Wow! That’s a lot of mazuma! Another rich woman is Bette Nesmith Graham, she invented liquid paper, and when she passed away, she left her 50 million dollar state to her son, former Monkee, Mike Nesmith. Gives the new meaning to being rich on paper.

Bob Dylan: We’re going back across the tracks with Jonny Rivers. The people on the poor side of town are still looking for love, as Johnny River sings about in this song, “Poor Side of Town.”

[Johnny Rivers – “Poor Side of Town”]

Bob Dylan: Johnny Rivers sung “How can you tell me how much you miss me, When the last time I saw you, you wouldn't even kiss me.” “Poor Side of Town,” Johnny Rivers – the man a lot of people remember for his song “Secret Agent Man,” but I always liked this one – “Poor Side of Town.”

Bob Dylan: In many American cities neighborhoods where poor people live are typically on one side of the city’s railroad tracks, close to factories and sources of pollution. This where you get the phrase “The wrong side of the tracks.”

Bob Dylan: Johnny could have told you just like Thoreau did, that a man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can left alone. On the other hand, Picasso said: “I’d like to live as poor man with lots of money.” As it says in Proverbs, Chapter 19, verse 17, “He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the Lord; and that which he hath given will he pay him again.” Think it over.

Bob Dylan: Here’s Freddie King singing, “Whatcha gonna do when the welfare system turns its back on you?”

[Freddie King – “The Welfare Turns its Back on You”]

Bob Dylan: That was Freddie King, “When Welfare Turns its Back on You.” In Sweden, they have a system of higher taxes, but welfare for everyone. They call it the “Swedish Model.” Well, I could go for a Swedish model right about now.

[unknown movie excerpt]

Bob Dylan: Well, there’s rich man, and there’s poor man, and there’s people who think they should be rich. But if you meet someone like that, Louis Jordan has a question for them. Here’s Louis, to ask the musical question – “If You're So Smart, How Come You Ain't Rich?” on Theme Time Radio Hour.

[Louis Jordan – “If You're So Smart, How Come You Ain't Rich?”]

Bob Dylan: It was Louis Jordan, talking about “If You're So Smart, How Come You Ain't Rich?” Louis was an alto saxophone player and a singer who got his start with Chick Webb – the famous hunchback drummer. Louis became one of the pioneers of rhythm and blues. Chuck Berry said Louis was one of his main influences, and Chuck doesn’t reflect or transmit light falling on anybody.

Bob Dylan: Here’s Emmylou Harris to paraphrase William Blake:
The wild winds weep
And the night is a-cold;
Come hither, Sleep,
And my griefs unfold
Emmylou Harris, “Hobo's Lullaby.”

[Emmylou Harris – “Hobo's Lullaby”]

Bob Dylan: That was “Hobo's Lullaby” – the song written by Goebel Reeves, who grew up middle class, but became a hobo known as “the Texas Drifter.” And sometimes he was known as “the Yodeling Rustler.”

[sound of yodeling]

Bob Dylan:... to get caught.

[My Man Godfrey excerpt:
There are two kinds of people:
Those who fight the idea of being pushed into the river, and the other kind.
One thing I discovered was that the only difference between a derelict and a man is a job.
]

Bob Dylan: That’s about all the time we’ve got for this week. If you’re poor, I hope you’ll get rich. If you’re rich, I hope you’ll get happy. We’ll see you next week on Theme Time Radio Hour, your home for get rich quick themes, dreams and scemes. Goodnight everybody, I’ll leave you with the words of Benjamin Franklin: “He that is of the opinion ‘money will do everything’ may well be suspected of doing everything for money.” Thank you, Ben. Peace out.


[“Top Cat (Underscore)"]

“Pierre Mancini”: You’ve been listening to Theme Time Radio Hour, with your host, Bob Dylan. Produced by Eddie Gorodetsky. Associate producer, Sonny Webster. Continuity by “Eeps” Martin. Edited by Damian Rodriguez. Supervising editor, Rob Macomber. The Theme Time research team: Diane Lapson and Bernie Bernstein, with additional research by Lynne Sheridan, Kimberly Williams, and Robert Bower. Production assistance by Jim McBean. Special thanks to Randy Ezratty, Debbie Sweeney, Coco Shinomiya, and Samson's Diner. For XM Radio, Lee Abrams. Recorded in Studio B, The Abernathy Building. This has been a Grey Water Park Production in Association with Big Red Tree.

“Pierre Mancini”: This is your announcer, Pierre Mancini, speaking.

“Pierre Mancini”: Join us again next week for Theme Time Radio Hour, when the subject is, “Devil.”

Bob Dylan: Here’s a tip on how you can save your money. Use somebody else’s.


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